ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

Conference proceedings from conferences, symposia, and events held at or sponsored by The University of Arizona are available in this collection. This collection also contains conference proceedings from organizations affiliated with The University of Arizona who have partnered with the University Libraries to make the proceedings openly available online.

The repository hosts proceedings from the Critical Librarianship and Pedagogy Symposium, a historical archive to the present from the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the International Telemetering Conference, among others.


QUESTIONS?

Are you affiliated with the University of Arizona and interested in making the conference proceedings from your organization freely available online to reach a wide audience of researchers around the world? Please contact the Office of Digital Innovation & Stewardship at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your request. We look forward to working with you.

Sub-communities within this community

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest, Volume 43 (2014)

    Unknown author (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
  • EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON LAND USE AND LAND COVER ON THE SAN PEDRO RIVER, ARIZONA

    Klotz, Jason; Tecle, Aregai; Northern Arizona University (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
  • RESTORATION BENEFITS TO NATURAL SPRINGS IN THE LAKE MARY WATERSHED

    Nash, Clairisse; Tecle, Aregai; Craig, Ashley; Sanchez-Meador, Andrew; Yocom, Larissa; Northern Arizona University (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
  • WATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF FOREST FIRES

    Tecle, Aregai; Neary, Daniel; Northern Arizona University; Rocky Mountain Research Station (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    This paper is concerned with the effects of forest fires on water quality, especially surface water quantity. The topic is important since surface water constitutes the main source of water for most domestic, industrial and commercial uses in the United States. The bulk of the surface water is the product of runoff from precipitation that falls as snow or rain on our forested and rangeland watersheds. In many areas such as the arid and semi-arid Southwest, the vegetation in these watersheds is dry and susceptible to wildfires. Oftentimes, fire in the form of prescribed burning is used to protect these areas from wildfire. However, such fire suppressions have resulted in overcrowded and dense vegetation and the production of abundant fuels in watersheds. Such a situation and the frequently recurring drought and extensive insect infestation have most forest systems susceptible to catastrophic fires that scorched many of the Nation's forests, rangelands, parks and other large-scale real estate properties (Neary et al. 2008, Lutz et al. 2009, Stein et al. 2013). In 2013, there were a total of 9,230 lightening started fires in the United States burning 3,057,566 acres. In the same year, there were 38,349 humancaused fires that burned 1,261,980 acres. This made the total acreage burned by the two types of fires in 2013 to be 4,319,546 acres (National Interagency Fire Center 2014). Such fires accounted for $13.7 billion in total economic losses and $7.9 billion in insured losses from 2000 through 2011 in the United States (Haldane 2013, International Association of Wildland Fire 2013). These burns also have tremendous effects on the characteristics of water-producing watersheds and the quality of the water coming out of them. This paper discusses the effects of wildland fires on water quality and suggests ways of managing fire-prone forested water source areas to prevent their degradation from wildland fires. The paper uses information from recently occurred catastrophic fires in Arizona to demonstrate the effects of wildland fires on water quality.
  • TRACE METAL AND PHOSPHATE PARTITIONING BETWEEN STORMWATER RUNOFF, GROUNDWATER AND SEDIMENTS ADJACENT TO LAKE HAVASU, ARIZONA

    Wilson, Doyle C.; Lake Havasu City Operations Department (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    A baseline study was established to characterize heavy metal, arsenic, selenium, and nutrient levels in stormwater runoff from Lake Havasu City, Arizona. It also lead to investigating the fate of those constituents in lake water, shallow groundwater and surficial sediments at the mouths of five washes draining from the city into Lake Havasu. Composite core and pit sediment samples collected at wash mouths before and during historic low lake water levels, reveal a fairly consistent metal and total phosphate presence at most wash sites. Two sites have generally higher concentrations where clay is a more significant component in the sediment. Regression correlations support that nickel has a strong association with chromium and cobalt in all sample types as well as with barium in runoff and groundwater. Copper and cobalt also show strong affinities with several other transition metals in groundwater and sediments. Reducing conditions prevail within 1-2 inches of the sediment surface at all locations, yet metal concentrations within 1.5 feet of the surface display a spatial change from increasing with depth at northern wash sites to a more variable pattern at southern sites. Phosphate concentration with depth is more variable and may contradict the local metal trends. Metal ion and complex adsorption to mineral and organic surfaces is expected though total organic carbon levels, reflected by the presence of freshly buried vegetation, are highly variable. Black color of sediment cores converts to yellow-brown overnight indicating chemical changes and the subordinate effect of organic matter in the sediment. Wash mouth sediments appear to be a repository for most metals and for total phosphate, though more work is needed to determine the mechanisms involved associating stormwater runoff with chemical and sediment deposition.
  • WATER HARVESTING IN ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    Ffolliott, Peter F.; Brooks, Kenneth N.; Neary, Daniel G.; Univ Arizona; Univ Minnesota; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    Water harvesting, also called rainwater harvesting, is a technique of developing surface water resources to augment the quantity and quality of water available to the people in arid and semi-arid regions where other water sources are not readily available or too costly to develop and use. A waterharvesting system consists of facilities for collecting and storing rainfall and the resulting surface runoff until the water is used for livestock, small-scale agricultural production, or domestic uses. A distribution facility can also be required unless the collected water is immediately concentrated in the soil profile to grow plants. For example, a distribution facility is needed when the stored water is used to irrigate an agricultural crop or provide water to households.Water harvesting is potentially applicable in almost any area receiving at least 100 millimeters (mm) of annual rainfall (National Academy of Science 1974). Larger volumes of water can be stored on sites where the annual rainfall is 250 mm or more and an adequate storage facility is available.
  • EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRE AND A WILDFIRE ON OAK SAVANNAS IN THE PELONCILLO MOUNTAINS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN BORDERLANDS REGION

    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Neary, Daniel G.; Decker, Donald D.; U.S. Forest Service; Univ Arizona; USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    The Southwestern Borderlands Region of Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico are known for its biological diversity and beauty. The area is characterized by its mountains surrounded by deserts and grasslands. The region contains representative animals and plants from the Rocky Mountains in the north to the Sierra Madre Mountains to the south. Madrean oak woodlands and savannas are common within the area covering millions of acres. Periodic fires caused by lightning or Native American people maintained the grasslands and reduced the encroachment of woody vegetation and the accumulations of woody fuels. However, the role of fire declined after the transcontinental railroad was completed and large herds of cattle were introduced into the area. Fires are still ignited but do not spread throughout the landscape largely because overgrazing caused a decline in herbaceous vegetation which carried fires. Aggressive fire suppression by land managers also contributed to the reduced influence of fire. Public and private land managers are concerned that the lack of fires in the Borderlands Region is to blame for the increase in woody species and the decline in biological diversity and productivity of the grasslands and savannas. The Peloncillo Programmatic Fire Plan was developed by the Coronado National Forest to re-introduce landscape level prescribed and managed fires into Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands within the Peloncillo Mountains (Gottfried et al. 2009). One of the issues was whether it was best to burn in the cool-season (November-April) or the warm-season (May-October) because of concerns about potential harm to the threatened New Mexican ridge-nosed rattlesnake (Crotalus willardi obscurus) and the endangered Palmer agave (Agave palmeri). The agave is important because it provides food for the endangered lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonyceris curasoae). The area usually burns during the warm period prior to the monsoon season.
  • CONTRIBUTIONS OF SILVICULTURE TO WATERSHED EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA'S PONDEROSA PINE FORESTS: A HISTORICAL REVIEW

    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Neary, Daniel G.; U.S. Forest Service; Univ Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    Silvicultural studies on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, the oldest experimental forest in the United States, have been the basis for planning and implementing watershed management experiments in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. The primary purpose of these experiments had been to evaluate the potentials for increasing streamflow volumes while maintaining or improving other ecosystem-based, multiple-resource values. Knowledge gained from these experiments has provided today's managers with a better appreciation of the past management of Arizona's ponderosa pine forests. The effects of applying silvicultural treatments formulated largely from studies on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest and effects of these treatments on forest structures are reviewed in a historical context in this paper.
  • CONTRIBUTIONS BY THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN RESEARCH STATION TO THE FOUR FOREST RESTORATION INITIATIVE: SILVICULTURE, WILDLIFE AND WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Neary, Daniel G.; Rocky Mountain Research Station, U.S. Forest Service; Univ Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    The 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests and the many resources that they provide are the basis for the wide range of interests and concerns relative to their stewardship by management agencies, special interest groups, and the general public. As might be expected, therefore, there are conflicts of interest among stakeholders. These conflicts often concern the impacts of tree cutting activities on non-market benefits such as wildlife habitats, streamflow regimes, and scenic beauty. A recent issue of conflict has been the application of prescribed or managed fires to reduce the large accumulations of flammable fuels that can cause damaging wildfires when ignited - especially ignitions in the wildland-urban-interface. However, silvicultural practices such as the application of prescribed fire or mechanical forest stand treatments that can reduce the accumulations of fuels are opposed by some members of society. Collaboration among the supportive but sometimes conflicting interests of the involved parties is necessary to resolve any difficult conflicts and thus provide more unified management of ponderosa pine forests.
  • BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR PROTECTING WATER QUALITY IN BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK PRODUCTION

    Neary, Daniel G.; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    In the quest to develop renewable energy sources, woody and agricultural crops are being viewed as an important source of low environmental impact feedstocks for electrical generation and biofuels production (Somerville et al. 2010, Berndes and Smith 2013). In countries like the USA, the bioenergy feedstock potential is dominated by agriculture (73%) (Perlack et al. 2005). In others like Finland the largest potential comes from forest resources. Forest bioenergy operational activities encompass activities of a continuing and cyclical nature such as stand establishment, mid-rotation silviculture, harvesting, product transportation, wood storage, energy production, ash recycling, and then back to stand establishment (Neary 2013). All of these have the potential to produce varying levels of disturbance that might affect site quality and water resources but the frequency for any given site is low (Berndes 2002, Shepard 2006, Neary and Koestner 2012). Agricultural production of feedstocks involves annual activities that have a much higher potential to affect soils and water resources. The way forward relative to assessing the soil and water impacts of bioenergy systems and the sustainability of biomass production rests with three approaches that could be used individually but are more likely to be employed in some combination (Neary and Langeveld 2013). These approaches are: (1) utilizing characteristics that can be quantified in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies by software, remote sensing, or other accounting methods (e.g.,greenhouse gas balances, energy balance, etc.; Cherubini and Strømman 2011); (2) measuring and monitoring ecosystem characteristics that can be evaluated in a more or less qualitative way (e.g., maintaining soil organic carbon) that might provide insights on potential productivity and sustainability, and (3) employing other proactive management characteristics such as Best Management Practices that are aimed at preventing environmental degradation.
  • USE OF CUMULATIVE EFFECTS ASSESSMENTS IN DETERMING THE IMPACTS OF HERBICIDE APPLICATION PROGRAMS ON WATER QUALITY

    Neary, Daniel G.; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
  • ARIZONA WATERSHED SYMPOSIA: A FORUM FOR REPORTING EARLY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

    Ffolliott, Peter P.; Univ Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    The role of the Arizona Water Resources Committee and the goal of the Arizona Watershed Program in the early watershed management activities of the state are presented in the introduction of this paper to place its contents in perspective. The Arizona Watershed Resources Committee was a “citizen's advisory committee” that was formed in 1956 to assist in implementing the recommendations made in historic Barr Report to increase water yields and enhance the other natural resources found on the watersheds in the Salt and Verde River Basins of north-central Arizona (Fox et al. 2000). The Barr Report had been released to the public in the form of a short summary publication (Part I) and a more detailed and comprehensive document (Part II), both with the intriguing title of “Recovering Rainfall - More Water for Irrigation,” in the fall of 1956 (Barr 1956a, 1956b, respectively). Contents of the report supported the belief of members of the Arizona Water Resources Committee and many other people that the state's watersheds were in “bad shape” while providing what was called a “scientific basis” for improving these conditions by more intensive watershed management to primarily increase streamflow volumes. The Arizona Watershed Program was a collaborative initiative of the Arizona Water Resources Committee, the Watershed Management Division of the Arizona State Land Department, and the U.S. Forest Service and their cooperators to investigate the effects of vegetative management practices on the hydrologic processes affecting water yields and incorporate the findings obtained into watershed management practices (Fox et al. 2000). It was planned that this general goal would be met by three “highly integrated” programs – a research program, an action program, and a public relations program. Findings of the research and action programs have been reported by Ffolliott and Thorud (1974, 1975), Hibbert (1979), Baker and Ffolliott (1998), Baker (1999), Neary et al. (2002, 2008), DeBano et al. (2004), Solomon and Schmidt (1981), and others. A main component of the public relations program – the Arizona Watershed Symposia – is the focus of this paper.
  • IMPACTS OF URBAN DEVELOPMENTS ON HYDROLOGIC PROCESSES

    Ffolliott, Peter P.; Brooks, Kenneth N.; Univ Arizona; Univ Minnesota (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 2014-04-12)
    Urbanization has been a significant cause for the fragmentation of wildland watersheds since the early 1950s. Furthermore, it is anticipated that urban developments will account for additional losses of natural landscapes into the 21st century. The National Resource Inventory of the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicated that millions of acres of forests, woodlands, agricultural croplands, and other open spaces were converted to urban and other developed areas in the 5 years beginning in 1992 as the rate of urbanization increased when compared to the earlier 10-year period (Alig et al. 2004). Aligned with a projected increase of more than 120 million people in the United States by 2050, urban developments will grow substantially into the future with the fastest rate in the western and southern regions. How urbanization impacts on hydrologic processes and how these impacts might be mitigated when necessary is the focus of this paper.
  • International Telemetering Conference Proceedings, Volume 53 (2017)

    Unknown author (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
  • SPECTRUM RELOCATION FUND TRANSITION AGILITY CHALLENGE

    von Niederhausern, Josef; Wade, Terry; Hagg, Michael; Morgan, Matthew; Uhland, Greg; Berard, Alfredo; Klein, Lorin; Eglin AFB, 96th Test Wing (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    Due to Auction 97 frequency sell off and anticipated higher usage of C-Band, space time code (STC) and low-density parity-check (LDPC) code were evaluated for latency, characterization, and performance during flight. The benefit of an STC path can be observed by measuring the channel power of a dual antenna and comparing it to the contributions from each antenna independently. The STC provides a benefit only when both antennas are visible to a receiver and when the combined result of a dual antenna system would destructively add. The Eglin Spectrum Reallocation Fund (SRF) Project transitions the United States Air Force (USAF) aeronautical mobile telemetry (AMT) from operations in frequencies auctioned by the Department of Commerce (DOC) as part of Auction 97. This paper describes the AMT test methods used and upgrades accomplished by the 96th Test Wing in order to meet requirements of Auction 97.
  • Telemetry Range Support Aircraft (TRSA) Program Providing the Navy with Next Generation TM and Range Support

    Roudebush, J. Kyle; Hernandez, Jose; Kujiraoka, Scott; Sanchez, Kenneth; NAVAIR (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    The aircraft currently being used to support the Navy’s mission of Telemetry Reception, Range Safety as well as Range Surveillance/Clearance are reaching the end of their useful life. As a result, there are ongoing efforts to procure a new aircraft and integrate these mission systems in order to continue the support of critical Naval Test Range operations. This paper will detail the current efforts being undertaken to upgrade a Gulfstream 550 to perform Range Support missions for the Multi-service Government Test Ranges.
  • ENERGY EFFICIENT CELLULAR NETWORK USING ADAPTIVE USER CLUSTERING ALGORITHM FOR SPARSELY POPULATED AREA

    Moazzami, Farzad; Astatke, Yacob; Kassa, Hailu B.; Morgan State University, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    In this paper, an algorithm for distance aware energy efficient Base Stations (BSs) is proposed, which exploits the knowledge of the distance between the Mobile User (MUs) and the BS. The proposed algorithm changes the cell radius depending on user distribution in the cell. In this case adaptive (dynamically changing) concentric circles are virtually drawn so that the UEs in the same concentric circle can get constant power from the BS. It means that the mobile users(MUs) are clustered based on the distance from the BS. The energy consumption has been evaluated without sacrificing significant offered Quality of Service (QoS) on the cellular networks. The proposed scheme aids to achieve energy saving as a result of reduced transmit power based on reducing the radius of the concentric. As the radius reduces the transmit power is also reduced logarithmically. The system uses Omni directional antenna which covers all 360 degree of the cell at once. The simulation result shows that as the distance from the BS decreases, the transmission power decreases and the energy also decreases. The distance or the radius variation dynamically is based on the number of users in that track comparing to the minimum required number of threshold users. The result shows that an average of 0.1762 dB or 1.04 Watt which is 9.45% of the maximum transmit power can be saved by dynamically varying the base station the radius at the area of low traffic load for a single scan.
  • PERFORMANCE OF THE EXTENDED TIME DIVERSITY TECHNIQUE IN REAL FLIGHT TEST CONDITIONS

    Blanc, Grégory; Skrzypczak, Alexandre; Pierozak, Jean-Guy; ZODIAC AEROSPACE - ZODIAC DATA SYSTEMS (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    The emission of the telemetry signal is required over minimum two different antennas to keep the telemetry link available during a maneuver of a flying object. If nothing is made at the transmitter side, the telemetry link can be fully lost as both signals may have an opposite phase. This is the well-known “2-antennas problem”, also known as the “porcupine effect”. In 2016, Zodiac Data Systems (ZDS) presented a pragmatic and cost effective concept named eXtended Time Diversity (XTD) which is dedicated to combat the porcupine effect. The efficiency of this concept was demonstrated through lab tests, as well as its robustness in presence of multipath. The goal of this paper is to present the performance of the Extended Time Diversity in real conditions, after a series of flight tests.
  • SEAMLESS HANDOVER AT HIGH SPEEDS FOR CELLULAR RANGE TELEMETRY

    Hedge, Vinayak; Nokia Networks (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    Cellular based Range Telemetry provides a lot of benefits over legacy Aeronautical Mobile Telemetry, such as: • Higher capacity, allowing multiple test articles (i.e. telemetry radio links) which have active telemetry data measurements exchanged in near real time. • Bi-directional radio links, that can allow new signaling with the avionics equipment on the test articles. • Higher performance provided by spectrally efficient OFDMA waveform used in LTE and the dynamic link adaptation that is built into the LTE waveform. With the CRTM cellular approach, the overall range coverage area is broken into multiple coverage areas, each served by a single cell. To maintain seamless service throughout the test flight, CRTM must support seamless mobility as the aircraft moves between the coverage areas of these cells. This is achieved using the connected mode handover procedures supported by LTE technology. Traditional LTE networks rely on signal strength measurements made by the User Equipment (UE) to make handover decisions. The measurement system and handover procedures have been designed to support mobility at speeds under 500 km/hr. To support mobility at higher speeds, the following need to be taken into account: - LTE User Equipment (UE) RF Signal Measurements: Accuracy of measurements depends on UE’s capability to measure the signal strength of a neighbor cell while synchronized to its serving cell. The higher Doppler shifts expected in an AMT environment due to the higher test article speeds and the higher frequency of operation along with the difference in Doppler shifts between the serving cell and neighbor cells complicates cell measurements. - Handover Processing Time: The serving eNodeB needs to process the measurements from the UE and initiate handover in a timely manner. Delays in handover processing can result in radio link failures. The higher speeds of test articles in the AMT environment reduces the time available to the eNodeB for handover processing. This paper explains the handover procedure in 4G LTE, with the focus on: Measurement reports that support handover decisions Decisions impacting data service delays during handover impacts to the handover processing when the UE (i.e. test article in CRTM) is moving at very high speed.

View more