ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The International Telemetering Conference/USA (ITC/USA) is dedicated to the promotion and stimulation of technical growth in telemetering and its allied arts and sciences. It is the premier annual forum and technical exhibition providing telemetry specific short courses, technical papers from professionals and students, and exhibits of the industry’s leading companies. ITC/USA is sponsored by the International Foundation for Telemetering (IFT), a non-profit corporation dedicated to serving the technical and professional interests of the telemetering community.

This collection contains the proceedings of the twentieth International Telemetering Conference, October 22-25, 1984. The conference, sponsored by the International Foundation for Telemetering, was held at the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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Recent Submissions

  • TRENDS IN GERMAN TELEMETRY SINCE THE 50’s

    Mayer, G.; DFVLR-German Aerospace Research Establishment, Applied Data Systems Div. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    The paper gives a short history of the beginnings in tele-meteorology and missile telemetry in Germany and describes the developments since the 50’s in these fields, and in remote control systems up to the present day.
  • COMMAND, CONTROL AND COMMUNICATIONS (C³) FOR THE DEFENSE METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE PROGRAM

    Williams, Stephen L., Captain; Kinney, Thomas W.; USAF Space Division; Harris Government Information Systems Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    This paper describes the architectural philosophy and the interaction between the DMSP C³ ground system and the strategic and tactical users of DMSP imagery data. Some of the ongoing activities relating to future enhancements and survivability are also explored. At the present time, the ground systems Satellite Operations Center (SOC) has been installed at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, and is supported by the two remote Command Readout Stations (CRS’s) at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, and Loring Air Force Base, Maine. All commanding, planning and telemetry processing is centralized at the SOC. Backup and redundant subsystems and communications services are provided for reliable operation plus there is an internet with the Air Force Satellite Control Facility (AFSCF) for early orbit and anomaly support.
  • SINGLE EVENT UPSETS IN SPACECRAFT DIGITAL SYSTEMS

    Lewkowicz, Paul E.; Richter, Linda Jean; Hughes Aircraft Company (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    This paper describes the physical environment that can result in random bit changes in space-borne memory systems. The impact of bit flips in digital telemetry systems is emphasized, with special attention paid to software requirements for protection from single event upset (SEU) effects. Some observations on incidence rates are presented along with an outline of hardware and software methods that can be taken to prevent future SEU problems. Several conclusions are drawn about strategies for preventing data corruption on the next generation of satellites in the presence of SEU-inducing particles.
  • NEW ANTENNA FEED REVITALIZES SPACE SHUTTLE TRACKER AT NASA EDWARDS

    Wrin, John W.; Sullivan, Arthur; NASA-Ames Research Center; Electro-Magnetic Processes, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    A twelve foot diameter Single-Channel Monopulse Tracking System, relegated to slaved backup status at NASA Edwards, was rejuvenated to support research flights for Ames Dryden Research Center and for tracking orbital passes of the Space Shuttle and Shuttle landings both at Edwards and at White Sands. Status has been upgraded to that of Stand- Alone Telemetry Tracking System. A significant factor in this upgrading was the replacing of the Single-Channel Monopulse feed with a RADSCAN feed developed by EMP. Previously the system would not autotrack at elevation angles below five (5) degrees. Since modification the system automatically acquires the Space Shuttle when it appears on the horizon and autotracks from approximately two (2) degrees in elevation to touchdown. This, virtually unattended. This paper describes the RADSCAN and Single Channel Monopulse concepts individually and then makes a detailed comparison between the two.
  • A TELEMETRY SYSTEM FOR MEASURING STRESS IN A HIP JOINT PROSTHESIS

    Postal, R. B.; Boreham, J. F.; California Institute of Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    It has been clinically observed that a significant fraction of hip joint implants fail due to mechanical loosening, particularly in younger, more active patients. Design enhancements are hampered by the lack of in vivo data of the actual forces produced on the prosthesis by various recipient activities. This paper describes a telemetry system small enough to fit in the spherical ball joint of a hip joint prosthesis. The system is capable of transmitting sufficient in vivo data to allow reconstruction of major forces through the prosthesis. The design allows for total hermetic enclosure of the electronic parts within the prosthesis which is implanted within the human body. Figure 1 shows 2 engineering model prosthesis assemblies. Input power coupling is provided through a cuff temporarily placed over the area of the device. Telemetry readout from the transmitter antenna, also totally enclosed, allows periodic out-patient checkup and monitoring. In this manner, since no batteries are used, in vivo monitoring of load forces on the prosthesis can be accomplished periodically over a several year period without surgical revision. The data obtained will be used to design stronger implants which will have very low failure rates even when subjected to activities of younger recipients.
  • COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF THE OXFORD CONTINUOUS BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORING: DATA PROCESSING SYSTEM

    Di Marco, A.; Cordone, L.; Palatini, P.; Mormino, P.; Pessina, A.C.; Sperti, G.; Dal Palú, C.; University of Padova (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    Blood pressure signals recorded continuously in ambulatory patients using the Oxford system were analyzed by an IBM 370 computer in order to obtain beat by beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure along 24 hour blood pressure recordings. The method of digitizing the signal and the analysis of the sphygmogram are presented and discussed. Synthesis of the several thousands data obtained in 24 hour recordings and plotting of the data for clinical purposes and pharmacological studies are also reported.
  • COMPANDER CIRCUITS IMPROVE TRANSDUCER DATA QUALITY

    Rieger, James L.; Naval Weapons Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    AC-coupled transducers such as crystal accelerometers and microphones can produce a large dynamic range of signals, but the expected level from such devices in an actual test situation may be difficult to predict. Use of compander circuits intended for telephone and “hi-fi” systems can increase dynamic range and accuracy of the signals from such devices and reduce noise at low levels and clipping at the top of the range. Companders (COMPressor plus expANDER) can be used in single- or double-ended modes depending on the data requirements. They do introduce predictable artifacts of their own, but many of these can be removed.
  • TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND REIMBURSABLE USE

    Scott, James N.; Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    The first satellite (TDRS-1) of the three-satellite TDRSS was launched by NASA in April 1983. A booster failure resulted in a delay in achieving the final synchronous orbiting position (until the following October) and has caused a delay in the launching of the second and third satellites. Nevertheless, NASA has obtained considerable operational experience with TDRS-1 and is generally pleased with the performance to date. This paper will provide an overview of how the TDRSS operates and its status, and will provide information about the policy, costs, and procedures regarding use of the system by non- NASA organizations.
  • A LEAK GUARD SYSTEM FOR FLEXIBLE SUBMARINE OIL PIPELINES

    Möller, Erhard; Bernstein, Lutz; Labor für Nachrichtentechnik (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    Using the actual Off-Shore-Technique large oil tankers do not call at ports but charge and discharge their oil at terminals anchored as far as 30 km off the shore. Figure 1 shows such a terminal as a floating buoy anchored to the seabed with a mooring tanker. Tanker and buoy are connected by flexible floating hoses, buoy and seabed terminal by flexible submarine hoses and seabed terminal with the shore station by steel pipelines. A control system had to be developed that would give an early warning before leakage. No details were given by the manufacturer or the users of the pipelines. Therefore a solution of the telemetring problems had to be derived from an analysis of the growing leak and the Off- Shore-System.
  • INFRARED LIGHT AND BIOMEDICAL TELEMETERING IN EUROPE

    Bornhausen, M.; Matthes, R.; Kimmich, H. P.; Univ. of Nijmegen; Bundesgesundheitsamt (BGA); Umweltforschung (GSF) (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    The applicability of telemetering devices in patient care and biomedical research is extended by the introduction of infrared (IR) light communication techniques. Research in this field demonstrated a particularly interesting potential for a multichannel/multipatient monitoring system comprising stimulation, remote control of physiological functions or drug delivery, and patient location. Compared to radiofrequency links IR-telemetry features distinct advantages, i.e. a wide transmission bandwidth which is not restricted by any government regulations, no interference with identical systems in adjacent rooms, no connector or antenna problems, and a cost-saving simple generation and detection of IRcarriers. Examples of recent laboratory and industrial developments are described.
  • ASSESSMENT OF METROLOGICAL PARAMETERS BY MEANS OF FIBER-OPTIC SENSORS

    Kist, Rainer; Fraunhofer-Institut für Physikalische Messtechnik (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    Fiber-optic sensors will get their share of the sensor market only if they can be made available at low prices or if they can solve metrological problems that have no suitable solutions within conventional sensor techniques. Since fiber-optic components are in general still high cost items, fiber-optic sensors are not likely to become competitive in this respect within the near future. These sensors do provide, however, important specific advantages such as isolation against high voltage, immunity against electromagnetic fields as well as explosive and/or corrosive environments, possibility of miniaturized and compact packaging of the sensing element, and application within a broad temperature range. Multimode fiber-optic sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, level , and refractive index are on the market already or very close to being commercialized. Monomode fiber-optic sensors are not yet on the market due to their more demanding technology and the corresponding higher cost level . They are expected, however to provide at acceptable costs in a forseeable future high precision solutions for metrological tasks under specific conditions (e.g. Sagnac gyroscopes, hydrophones, temperature measurement in a microwave field).
  • Telemetering Standards Coordination Committee

    McAnally, Claude W. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
  • SPACE LASER COMMUNICATIONS COMPETITION FOR MICROWAVES

    Svorec, Raymond W.; Gerardi, Francis R.; The Aerospace Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
  • INTRODUCTION OF S-BAND TELEMETRY TRACKING SYSTEMS AT THE CHURCHILL RESEARCH RANGE (CRR) DURING 1983/84

    Dawson, Brian F.; Canada Centre for Space Science; Operations Section (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    S-Band Auto-track systems were introduced at CRR in January 1983 and each consists of a 3.0 metre reflector, pedestal, servo drive, antenna controller with dual RF channels, double ended feed, low noise amplifier and downconverters to P-Band frequencies. The S-Band requirements and restrictions at CRR will be discussed, and the factors restricting launch acquisition explained. Angle data (AZ/EL) is transferred in real-time to an HP 9845 processor for quick-look and later trajectory analysis purposes plus comparison with Interferometer/Tone Ranging and Command Systems (TRACS) data. This presentation is intended to provide a basic familiarity with S-Band facilities and capabilities now available to Range Users at CRR.
  • S-BAND CIRCULARLY POLARIZED MICROSTRIP PHASED ARRAY

    Coombs, Dennis L.; Ball Aerospace Systems Division (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    A highly efficient circulary polarized S-band microstrip planar phased array is described. The array is: • Electronically steerable in elevation and azimuth • Highly efficient at the subarray level (greater than 60 percent) • Well matched for active impedance with a near cos a scan performance • Designed for optimum G/T performance • Designed to have a thin profile but be extremely strong The microstrip elements, phase shifters and combiner network are described in detail and their operation is explained.
  • AN ELECTRICALLY-SMALL MONOPOLE PHASED ARRAY ANTENNA FOR WIDE BAND APPLICATIONS

    Sheng Y. Peng; Pfaff, Gerald A.; Teledyne Micronetics (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    An electrically-small, lightweight, and low RCS (radar cross-section) Monopole Array Antenna has been developed for wide band application. The monopoles were printed on a low dielectric constant (εr = 2.3) substrate and fed by a modified meanderline microstrip feed structure, with quarter-wavelength stubs to improve feed efficiency. The operational frequency is from 0.65 to 2.0 GHz. The physical size of the monopole array measures only 0.125 wavelength in height. The weight is about 0.3 pounds. A four-element subarray was built and tested. Its overall physical size is 2.5 inches in height by 10 inches in length by 24.4 inches in width. The measured gain and pattern data are presented, as well as the low RCS property and many applications of the monopole array.
  • HIGH DENSITY DIGITAL RADAR RECORDING SYSTEM

    LEUNG, VICTOR; DATATAPE INCORPORATED (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    EGLIN AFB, Armament Division, had initiated an ongoing update efforts to replace the obsolete video recorders and associated digitizing capability used to record radar signature data. The prime objective of this program was realized and has demostrated the feasibility of HIGH DENSITY DIGITAL RECORDING, as a means of radar video recording and has developed the interface design criteria for all radar sites at EGLIN AFB. The HIGH DENSITY DIGITAL RECORDER/REPRODUCER system had been adapted for radar use with a micro-processor driven radar interface unit that includes the following: A/D and D/A Converters, Input and Output formatter, Memories, Filtering Networks and Error Detection and Correction (EDAC), Auxiliary data mux and demux. The System has four modes of operation with a digitizing rate of 30 Mega-samples and a selectable 6, 7 or 8 bit resolution. The four modes are: Single radar channel, Dual radar channel, PRI sequence and Snapshot memory.
  • RECORDING PSK ON A ROTARY HEAD RECORDER

    Morgan, David P.; Datatape Incorporated, a Kodak Company (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    The paper presents a technical overview of recording predetection data such as PSK, QPSK and QPRS on a DATATAPE developed 8MHZ wideband instrumentation rotary head recording system. Included is a technical description and signal characteristic of the recorder as well as a summary of the test results of the predetection and post detection data.
  • A COMPUTERIZED CHECK-OUT SYSTEM FOR TRANSDUCERS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Brandt, Axel; SCS Technische Automation und Systeme GmbH (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    A computerized check-out system for recording and analysis of test data of transducers in nuclear power plants is described. The system is composed of two subsystems, the STATIONARY and the MOBILE SYSTEM. The STATIONARY SYSTEM fulfills all necessary administrative functions, allows data analysis, reporting, and longterm storage of test data. The MOBILE SYSTEM is the test device. It is set up by three components - controller unit, interface, and microcomputer - the whole being assembled on a moveable wagon which makes on site testing of the transducers possible. The number of MOBILE SYSTEMS is selectable according to user needs and environmental condititions. Data transport between the systems is accomplished via magnetic tape cartridges or online by a standardized communication line.
  • A METHOD FOR OBTAINING REAL TIME RECOVERY VEHICLE DATA

    Diebel, Dean L.; Recovery Systems Instrumentation Branch (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1984-10)
    In the development and design of parachutes, select data parameters are required for evaluation. These parameters give the designer dynamic information in actual environments providing stress, load, and glide ratio information. At present this information (altitude, rate of descent, total velocity, acceleration, dynamic pressure and attitude), is obtained by the use of space positioning methods. Meterological data, used to calculate some of these parameters, are obtained from rawinsonde balloons which are launched one half to two hours before and after the drop test. Typical combined data accuracies are on the order of plus or minus f ive percent with most of these errors being ascribed to the fact that the weather data is not taken at the time of the test and atmospheric conditions change rather quickly during the morning hours when the tests are typically done. A method has been developed which will measure meterological data real time. Direct measurements are taken via transducers ie. pressure, acceleration, attitude, temperature and humidity. These transducers are combined in the microprocessor circuitry to obtain final data prior to solid state recording or transmission. This paper will describe the methods and justifications for pursuing a different type of data gathering system.

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