ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The Forage and Grain Report is one of several commodity-based agricultural research reports published by the University of Arizona.

This report, along with the Cotton Report, was established by Hank Brubaker, Extension Agronomist, after seeing a similar report published by Texas A&M University in the mid-1970’s.

The purpose of the report is to provide an annual research update to farmers, researchers, and those in the agricultural industry. The research is conducted by University of Arizona and USDA-ARS scientists.

Both historical and current Forage and Grain Reports have been made available in the UA Campus Repository as part of a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the University Libraries.

Other commodity-based agricultural research reports available in the UA Campus Repository include:
Cotton Reports | Citrus Reports | Sugarbeet Reports | Turfgrass Reports | Vegetable Reports


QUESTIONS?

Mike Ottman is the current editor of the Forage and Grain Reports. Contact CALS Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu, or visit the CALS Publications website.


Contents for Forage & Grain Report 2013

Recent Submissions

  • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Arizona City, Maricopa and Yuma, 2013

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1265.pdf.
  • Effect of Planting Date on Wheat Yield in Yuma, 2013

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Planting dates are known to affect wheat yields. Previous research has shown that the optimum planting date in Yuma is December 15 to January 15. Wheat is sometimes sown later than this in the Yuma area, and earlier planting dates have not been tested. To test a wide range of planting dates, six varieties(Duraking, Havasu, Joaquin, Kronos, WB-Mead, and Yecora Rojo) were planted at two seeding rates (160 and 240 lbs/A) and six planting dates at the beginning of each month from November through April at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center. Grain yield averaged 6517 (Nov 4), 6339 (Dec 6), 6096(Jan 4), 5712 (Feb 1), 4962(Mar 1), and 3590(Apr 5). The late-flowering varieties performed relatively better at the earlier planting dates. Seeding rates of 160 and 240 lbs/A had no measureable effect on yield overall.
  • 2012 Sorghum Silage Variety Trial at Maricopa

    Loper, Shawna; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Nine varieties of silage sorghum and one pearl millet variety were tested at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in Maricopa, AZ. Information on silage sorghum yield and quality can be of use to the dairy industry and help growers choose the best varieties based on their needs. We found no significant differences among the varieties for ash, ADF, and NDF. We did find significant differences in yield with Silo 700 BMR having the highest yield with 31.62 tons/acre and GS125 having the lowest with 20.53 tons/acre. We also saw significant differences in crude protein with ExpGD having the highest (3.47%) and Silo 700 BMR (1.93%) being the lowest.
  • Cultivar and Nitrogen Effects on Yield and Grain Protein in Irrigated Durum Wheat, 2012

    Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Brunson, Kevin; Thorp, Kelly; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona; Arid-Land Ag Research Center, USDA-ARS, Maricopa, AZ (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    The grain yield and nitrogen use efficiency of durum wheat vary in response to genotypic and nitrogen fertilization were studied in field during two growth seasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects the N fertilizer rate on grain yield and quality under irrigated desert conditions in relation to N utilization. Six durum wheat cultivars (Duraking, Havasu, Kronos, Ocotillo, Orita, Topper) were grown in field trails under irrigated regimes at five N levels (0, 65, 110, 160, 240 lbs/acre) in 2010-2011 and six N levels (0, 65, 110, 160, 240, 360 kg ha-1) in 2011-2012 at Maricopa Ag Center. The results showed the varieties and N levels both significantly affected grain yield, grain protein concentration, and nitrogen use efficiency. A simple and rapid method to measure crop N status using SPAD meters was also developed. The results showed that using the differences in SPAD readings between the first and second fully expanded leaves is a useful way to improve effectiveness of SPAD meters in durum wheat N management.