ABOUT THE COLLECTION


The University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) - a unit within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences - promotes understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research, community outreach and public education.

The WRRC produces research reports, outreach materials and regular publications, including the quarterly Arizona Water Resource (AWR) newsletter. The AWR and the Arroyo, an annual publication focusing on a single water topic of timely concern in Arizona, are distributed via an email subscription list and posted on the WRRC website.

Selected current and past WRRC Issue Papers and other publications are available through the University of Arizona Campus Repository. To find these publications, use the Advanced Search tool at arizona.openrepository.com. In addition to the publications available on this website, all current and archived WRRC publications are available at wrrc.arizona.edu/publications.

QUESTIONS?

For more information, visit the WRRC website (wrrc.arizona.edu) or contact us at (520) 621-9591.

Recent Submissions

  • Boundary Flow in Laboratory Permeameters Used To Stimulate Recharge by Cyclic Water Spreading

    Worcester, B. K.; McIntosh, T. H.; Wilson, L. G.; Water Resources Research Center (American Geophysical Union, 1968-06)
  • Sediment Removal from Flood Water by Grass Filtration

    Wilson, L. G.; Water Resources Research Center (American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 1967)
  • A Case Study of Dry Well Recharge

    Wilson, L. Graham; Water Resources Research Center (Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1983-09)
  • Arizona's Changing Rivers: How People Have Affected the Rivers

    Tellman, Barbara; Yarde, Richard; Wallace, Mary G.; Water Resources Research Center; Water Resources Research Center; Water Resources Research Center (Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-03)
  • Sistemas Economicos de Captacion de Agua Para Aumentar su Abastecimiento en Tierras Aridas

    Cluff, C. B.; Dutt, G. R.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Soils, Water & Engineering, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1973-06)
    Las investigaciones sobre sistemas de captación de aguas pluviales conducidas en la Universidad de Arizona durante los últimos diez años han indicado la utilidad económica de cuatro tipos básicos de colectores y tres métodos de almacenamiento.
  • Comments on Report of Tucson Community Goals Conference

    Kassander, A. Richard, Jr.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (2014-03-22)
  • Runoff Farming for Increased Jojoba Yields

    Cluff, C. Brent; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1972-06)
  • Proposed Municipal Effluent-Irrigation Water Exchange System, Tucson-Avra-Marana Region, Arizona

    Water Resources Research Center. University of Arizona.; Agricultural Experiment Station. University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1971)
  • The Effect of an Intensive Summer Thunderstorm on a Semiarid Urbanized Watershed

    Boyer, D. G.; DeCook, K. J.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (2014-03-21)
    The University of Arizona Atterbury Experimental Watershed, located southeast of Tucson, Arizona has been instrumented for precipitation and runoff measurements since 1956. Early on the afternoon of July 16, 1975 an intense convective thunderstorm produced more than three inches of rainfall in less than 50 minutes as recorded in several rain gages located in the middle of one 8.1 square-mile desert subwatershed. Storm runoff from this rural subwatershed and an adjacent recently urbanized subwatershed filled the newly finished Lakeside Reservoir and topped the concrete flood spillway with a peak of greater than 3000 cfs, the greatest flow since monitoring began. An analysis of storm characteristics, along with previously available data from local urbanized watersheds, allows speculation on the effect of such an intensive storm in a highly urbanized.area.
  • Sources and Potential Uses of Salvageable Waters in Arizona Urban Regions

    DeCook, K. J.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1976-06)
  • Pollution Potential of a Sanitary Landfill near Tucson

    Wilson, L. G.; Small, Gary G.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1973-08)
  • Development of a Mathematical Model of Infiltration Which Includes the Effects of Raindrop Impact (Project Completion Report)

    Cluff, C. B.; Evans, D. D.; Morse, J. G. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1973)
    The purpose of this investigation was to use an existing mathematical model of infiltration to assist in determining which factors, including raindrop impaction, were responsible for infiltration characteristics of a bare semiarid watershed. The infiltration model developed by Roger Smith was selected as best suited for this investigation. Several laboratory and field rainfall simulator runs were modeled. Good correlation was found between the modeled and experimental results for both the infiltration data and the saturation profiles, for both bare and grass covered plots. For the lab and field experiments a realistic rotating disk rainfall simulator was used. In the field tests bare and grass covered plots were tested. In the lab specially constructed soil boxes were used that permitted measurement of infiltration and saturation profiles with time. Gross changes in saturated hydraulic conductivities due to crusting effects were also measured. Gamma ray attenuation techniques were used to obtain density and soil moisture profiles for the laboratory experiments. It was found that the Smith model can be used to simulate infiltration from different surface conditions as long as there is some method to calibrate the model. Carefully obtained saturated and unsaturated hydraulic properties for the soil types present in the watershed are needed in addition to infiltration data from a realistic rainfall simulator or through hydrograph analysis from unit subwatersheds.
  • Development of Asphalt Cushioned Plastic and Plastic Reinforced Asphalt Membranes for Seepage Control (Project Completion Report)

    Cluff, C. B.; Jimenez, R. A.; Frobel, R. K.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Civil Engineering, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1975-07)
    This project was concerned with laboratory equipment development, laboratory testing, construction equipment development and field investigation of the APAC (Asphalt-Plastic-Asphalt-Chip-Coated) water seepage barrier. The laboratory equipment that was designed and fabricated for the project included hydrostatic testing vessels, slope stability apparatus, and tensile testing grips. Three testing methods were utilized and evaluated in the APAC investigation. The first test method evaluated the hydrostatic puncture resistance of the asphalt-polyethylene combination. This test confirmed the hypothesis that the asphalt effectively increases the puncture resistance of the APAC membrane over that of plain polyethylene. The second test investigated the slope stability of a protective APAC chip seal. It was found that a typical 3/8 in. (9.5 mm) cover aggregate remained stable on constructed slopes of 3:1 and 4:1 and that the 2:1 slope remained stable up to a surface temperature of 1220F (500C). The third test method evaluated adhesive materials and indicated that Presstite mastic was the best suited adhesive for sealing polyethylene overlaps. Subsequent field investigations resulted in equipment development that increased construction efficiency in the installation of the APAC membrane. Actual completed field installations were evaluated and further recommendations are included.
  • Water Resources Research Center, The University of Arizona, Artificial Recharge Projects

    Unknown author (Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-03-21)
  • Modelling Artificial Recharge in the Tucson Basin

    Wilson, L. G.; Rasmussen, W. O.; Lomen, D. O.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Watershed Management, University of Arizona; Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona (1975-01-24)
  • How To Get People To Use Models

    Resnick, Sol; University of Arizona (1975-07-17)
  • Management of Urban Runoff for Conjunctive Recreational Use and Floodflow Reduction, Tucson Region

    DeCook, K. J.; Resnick, S. D.; Cluff, C. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1975-02)
  • A Study of the Water Quality Implications of Interfacing the Central Arizona Project with the Municipal Wastewater - Irrigation Water Exchange Concept, Pima County, Arizona

    Cluff, C. B.; Day, A. D.; DeCook, K. J.; Phillips, R. A.; Simpson, E. S.; Tucker, T. C.; Wilson, L. G.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Civil Engineering, University of Arizona; Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona; Department of Soils, Water & Engineering, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1975-02-07)
  • An Outline for a Proposal for a Study of Retired Farmland Management in Urbanizing Semiarid Environments

    Cluff, C. B.; DeCook, K. J.; Jordan, G. L.; Dutt, G. R.; Day, A. D.; Mielke, E. A.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Department of Range Management, University of Arizona; Department of Soil, Water & Engineering, University of Arizona; Department of Agronomy, University of Arizona; Department of Horticulture, University of Arizona (2014-03-21)
  • Conflicts in Water Transfer from Irrigation to Municipal Use in Semiarid Environments

    Cluff, C. B.; DeCook, K. J.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (1974-11)
    Groundwater is the principal supply for irrigation and for rapidly increasing municipal water requirements in Arizona. As a result of this increasing demand water tables are declining at an ever increasing rate. Even with importation of water through the Central Arizona Project, transfer of water from agricultural to urban use is inevitable as the State continues to grow. In the Phoenix area this transfer is occurring progressively without undue conflict. As the City expands, adjacent farmland is developed and water formerly applied to crops is used for domestic purposes. In the Tucson area, which at present is entirely dependent on groundwater, outlying irrigated lands have been purchased and retired by the City and nearby mines to secure water rights. This forced retirement of farmland does present several conflicts which are discussed in this paper.

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