ABOUT THE COLLECTION

This collection contains master's theses from the Landscape Architecture program, dating back to 1979. Most of these reports and theses were digitized from paper copies held previously in the Fine Arts Library, while reports and theses after 2005 were submitted electronically to be archived and made available online.


QUESTIONS?

Contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with questions about items in these collections.

Recent Submissions

  • SUB-CULTURAL PREFERENCE FOR SUSTAINABLE URBAN FORESTS IN AGUA PRIETA, SONORA, MEXICO

    Pena-Mayoral, Luis Gerardo (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • Theory and Design Considerations of a Saline Ecological Landscape: A constructive method to reduce brine waste volume

    Bresdin, Cylphine; Glenn, Ed; Scott, Beth; Blazquez, Oscar (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    Pertinent abiotic and biotic factors and their interdependencies necessary to comprehend the ecology of saline systems are investigated and evaluated. A designed saline ecosystem is proposed as a constructive method to reduce waste volume. Landscape pattern is investigated as the vehicle for an evapotranspiration induced directional saline gradient. A demonstration site is used to explore conceptual design application of the idea of ecosystem pattern consisting of a linear sequence of ecotopes, each displaying its own ecological community in relation to salinity range and site context. Biota is relinquished to self-organization. Potential for research use of the ecosystem is illustrated.
  • From Classic to Gothic: The interplay between the universals and the particulars in the European architectural history

    Nakhai, Farzad, 1947- (The University of Arizona., 1991)
    This thesis deals with the development of and the interaction between the ideals of classical universalism and the ideas of Gothic particularism. Part One traces the birth and the development of classical universalism; Part Two, medieval particularism. Part Three deals with the renaissance of the classical formulas, the adversary position the Renaissance held against medievalism and its consequences for the succeeding centuries. Part Four deals with the ideas of particularism making a come-back, leading to the formation of the Gothic Revival Movement. The Gothic Revival Movement and its adversary position against classical universalism is treated in Part Five. Part Six looks at the ninteenth century Revivalism and the birth of the new industrial era.
  • IMPROVING TOURISM AND RECREATION: POTENTIAL FOR ECONOMIC AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN CIUDAD ACUNA, COAHUILA (MEXICO - USA BORDER CITY)

    Abelar, Raul Refugio, 1953- (The University of Arizona., 1987)
    This thesis advocates development of a program to rehabilitate Braulio Fernandez Park and the commercial sector of Hidalgo Street in the border city of Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila, Mexico. Guidelines for the treatment and development of both new and existing elements within the study area were generated based upon the following: an analysis of the economic and physical needs of the community, and examination of the natural and urban environment, a study of existing landscape architectural amenities in various border cities, and research documenting attitudes and perceptions of the people within the study area as they relate to the issues presented herein. Revitalization through the administration of this program would increase tourism, promote recreation and would enable Braulio Fernandez Park and commercial street Hidalgo to serve as a more impressive and prosperous gateway to Ciudad Acuna and to Mexico.
  • Subsurface irrigation of turf: An examination of current methods

    Schmoll, Timothy Jon, 1942- (The University of Arizona., 1991)
    This study examines literature on subsurface irrigation of turf using published and unpublished sources to determine its relevance for the designer of irrigation systems. It looks at two installed sites to determine current industry practices and then develops a model to assist the designer of these systems. Finally areas in need of further research and technical development are suggested. Literature is not readily available to the designer and it is sometimes contradictory. Case studies show that subsurface irrigation is an effective method of irrigating turf, especially in arid parts of the world. A model to select tubing and emitter spacing is developed by summarizing existing literature and case studies. Virtually all areas of design, installation and management need further research. Two primary areas that need further investigation are specific design issues and benefits to the end user such as cost, water savings and maintenance procedures.
  • The therapeutic values of gardens and landscapes

    Batelli, Penny Lynn, 1963- (The University of Arizona., 1998)
    Research has shown that plants, gardens, and nature can promote and enhance human health and well-being. A review of the relevant literature examined human-environment relationships and the possible therapeutic benefits derived from these relationships. In addition to the research literature, therapeutic gardens designed by landscape architects were examined. A comparative analysis between various theories within the research literature, and between the research literature and executed designs was performed. This analysis resulted in design suggestions and guidelines from the point of view of fostering human health and well-being.
  • REST-STOPS ON SAUDI ARABIAN HIGHWAYS (SERVICE AREAS)

    Alawayed, Abdulaziz Mohammed, 1957- (The University of Arizona., 1986)
  • Categories of elderly experience in the landscape

    Doxtater, Rebecca Jo, 1944- (The University of Arizona., 1992)
    Aspects of landscape experience by the elderly are explored. An understanding of this user group is sought through investigation of stereotypes, personality traits, psyco-social, and physical aspects of aging. A construct of use categories provides a system for understanding the environment in terms of what it is perceived to provide its users. Use categories include wayfinding, human territoriality, cultural expression, visual and non-visual aesthetics, and task performance. Drawing from literature and research in many areas, each of these categories is first defined in general terms. Each is then surveyed relative to its more specific application to the elderly which is followed by an examination of each category as it relates to the elderly and landscape. Application of categories to site analysis, programming, design, post-occupancy evaluations, and research is proposed. Some landscape design implications for the elderly are noted along with areas for further research.
  • Lessons learned from 13 street tree programs that work

    Ratliff, Judith Diana, 1950- (The University of Arizona., 1991)
    As public and private groups around the country--spurred on by the deforestation of our cities--gear up for a major tree planting effort between now and the turn of the century, many planners are seeking examples of successful planting programs to give them ideas about how best to proceed. An extensive survey of 13 acknowledged successful street tree planting programs was undertaken to illuminate a shared framework for fruitful action, including organizational structure and funding strategies. Street tree programs were targeted because these trees planted in the public right-of-way are truly community trees. Both governmental and privately run programs were part of the survey. A major finding is that many cities are moving toward a partnership between private organizations and city forestry programs to fund the planting and maintenance of trees. While the surveyed programs have proved fairly adept at matching trees with existing planting sites, there is almost a complete lack of master planning of the vegetative resource and no thought given to altering prevailing modes of urban development to make more room for trees.
  • Design-Build: A Cornerstone in the Education of Landscape Architecture

    Scott, Beth; Stoltz, Ron; Livingston, Margaret; Ware, Charlie (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    It is common for the education of architecture and landscape architecture to separate the technical (build) from the design (studio). Another line of thought is that in a well-rounded education in architecture and landscape architecture, couples design with the act of construction. This allows for a healthy balance from conceptualization to construction, which in turn, may foster stronger, integrated design skills. Familiarization with the construction process from materials and construction methods to budgeting and project management offers increased experience and understanding and can foster confidence and assurance crucial to decision making throughout academic and professional careers. This process can also lead to innovation and expansion of theory in the field due to the physical implementation and testing of ideas and concepts. As a growing number of architectural graduates are beginning their career and thriving in the design-build sector, this model of education is to evolve as a cornerstone in the curriculum of an architecture or landscape architecture program. This thesis explores the history, theory, and implementation of design-build education in the field of architecture and landscape architecture. Furthermore, an analysis is to be conducted on present day curriculum standards and previously conducted student and post-graduate surveys, as well as student and professional interviews. Based on research and reflections, a curriculum for a design-build studio within a school of landscape architecture is developed.
  • Defining success in schoolyard design in Tucson, Arizona: Evaluating schoolyards utilizing assessment, staff perceptions, and achievement test scores

    Schaefer, Renee (The University of Arizona., 2003)
    Determining the criteria and then evaluating schoolyard environments is a challenge due to the myriad aspects of what may constitute successful design of schoolyards. The intention of this study was to identify the design elements, qualities, or processes of elementary schoolyards that determine the success of these environments. Descriptive and comparative data analyses were conducted following the distribution of questionnaires and the application of criteria checklists to a sample of public elementary schools in Tucson, Arizona. The discovered patterns contributed information as to how well these schoolyards are providing a successful outdoor experience for staff and children, as well as what factors determine that positive outcome. The findings are useful for the design of future school outdoor environments and the redesign of existing schoolyards in Tucson and the Southwest, and may be applicable in other regions.
  • Relationship between remnant size and plant species richness in the Tucson urban matrix

    Duncan, Allison B. (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    The Sonoran Desert surrounding Tucson, Arizona is the dominant matrix in a region undergoing a transition from desert matrix to urban matrix with little emphasis placed on preserving this native ecosystem intact. Instead, patches of desert, remnants, are cut off the desert matrix and surrounded by a variety of land uses including residential, transit, and commercial. 31 sites within the City of Tucson were surveyed and the site's plant species richness, woody cover, herbaceous cover, and disturbance percentage measured. The plants found on-site were classified into native or exotic, annual or perennial, and woody or herbaceous, and further broken down into growth form. Results indicated a significant correlation between a site's area and its percent disturbance, as well as correlations between its native vegetation and area.
  • Changes in riparian vegetation following release of reclaimed effluent water into the Santa Cruz River: As a corollary, the effects of channelization on vegetation in the Santa Cruz River

    Gormally, Joshua (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    Recharge has been conducted very efficiently for twenty-five years near Roger and Ina roads along the Santa Cruz River using reclaimed water. This project seeks to determine the composition of river vegetation due to the release of the reclaimed water, and as a corollary, to examine the effects of channelization on the vegetation of the Santa Cruz River. Using belt and line transects the vegetation along the Santa Cruz River was surveyed. Treatment with effluent was found to increase plant density, diversity, richness, cover, and incidence of exotic plants. Channelization was found to increase only plant richness and incidence of exotic plants. Furthermore, effluent encouraged the growth of tree plant types while channelization discouraged such growth. Recommendations were made regarding future release of effluent into the Santa Cruz River and future attempts to restore the once prolific, willow-cottonwood forests and mesquite forests.
  • Visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing: An evaluation of six exhibits in the western United States

    Ridgway, Stephanie Clark (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    The design of zoo and aquarium exhibits has a strong influence on visitor behavior in exhibit enclosures. Furthermore, zoo exhibits with underwater viewing draw large crowds. The intent of this study was to formulate significant design criteria, through post-occupancy evaluation, to be used for the design of successful underwater exhibits in zoos. This study was conducted to reveal factors significantly influencing viewing time and visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing. At four zoo facilities, 331 visitor groups were observed and asked to participate in a short survey at six zoo exhibits. Chi-square analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate observation and survey results. The size of the underwater viewing window, animal size, animal aquatic activity, presence of infant animals, visitor group type and crowding levels had a significant impact on visitor behavior. Recommendations for the future design of underwater zoo exhibits are discussed.
  • Site planning in Guadalajara architecture education: An exploratory study

    Vergara, Santiago (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    In recent years, the use of site planning in architecture has significantly increased. However, a large number of architecture schools in Mexico have not included this subject in their educational profile. This may strongly impact regions where there is an absence of city planning-related disciplines to cover this demand. This study explores how professionals, professors and students of architecture schools in Guadalajara, Mexico, perceive the importance of site planning in their profession and examines the potential of expanding these concepts in their curricula. This study found that site planning concepts and applications are considered essential knowledge for Guadalajara architects' education. Aso, a high potential for expanding site development issues, the use of systematic approaches, and the incorporation of tools was found.
  • Techniques for improving established golf courses: Restoration, renovation, and redesign. An improvement plan for the Meadow Club (Fairfax, California)

    Thawley, Mark Todd (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    This study clearly defines and identifies the difference between the terms, restoration, renovation and redesign. In order to understand characteristics found on golf courses built in different eras, the history of golf course architecture has also been summarized. Research was gathered from eight courses that have recently completed some type of improvement project or that are currently undergoing improvements. The results show that the process of improving golf courses built before World War II differs considerably from improving those built after the War. Through neglect the former have lost many unique design characteristics and are therefore worthy of restoration. Based on the results of this study, key factors for successful restoration have been identified and applied to the Meadow Club, a course that is currently planning improvements. Built in 1927 the Meadow Club was originally designed by legendary golf architect, Alister Mackenzie.

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