ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

These collections contain master's reports and master's theses from the Architecture program, dating back to 1977. Most of these reports and theses were digitized from paper copies held previously in the Fine Arts Library, while reports and theses after 2005 were submitted electronically to be archived and made available online.


QUESTIONS?

Contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with questions about items in these collections.

Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • Rethinking Strip Malls

    Blanco Canton, Esther; Matter, Fred; Boghosian, Harry; Roddy, Mark (The University of Arizona., 1998)
  • The Design Theory - A Systematic Approach

    Ramasamy, Vivekanandan; Matter, Fred S.; Clarke, Kenneth (The University of Arizona., 2016-03-22)
  • The Project for "Cultural Exchange Center" in Beijing, P.R. China

    Zhou, Xiaowei (The University of Arizona., 1989)
  • Scheduling System for Use in Construction Practice

    Liu, Max Kuanhsiung; Matter, Fred S.; Green, Ellery C.; Huie, Douglas (The University of Arizona., 1987)
  • Near West Side Center: Adaptive Reuse of an Abandoned Factory in Chicago

    Montgomery, Kevin; Cheng, Renee; Matter, Fred; Nevins, Robert (The University of Arizona., 1998)
  • Improving Daylight Illumination and Energy Efficiency Using an Atrium in a Mixed-Use Building

    Godhamgaonkar, Anjali; Chalfoun, Nader; Hammann, Ralph; Medlin, Larry (The University of Arizona., 2005)
    Commercial /mixed use buildings in which electric lighting consumes more than 40% of all electric energy demands are discovering a changing need for daylight under the impacts of energy costs. Using atrium in a design can provide adequate light levels into the core spaces. This research attempts to bring the interior daylighting illumination levels within a mixed used commercial -residential building in a desired range of comfortable intensity by using atrium in combination with other daylighting strategies. This research aims to achieve adequate daylight, along all the levels in the atrium and also achieve comfortable intensities in the surrounding spaces. A mixed use atrium building on a site in Tucson, Arizona, was designed and investigated for daylight which involved physical model (experimental) study and computer simulation using software Superlite. Problem areas in daylight performance of the design with respect to the desired daylight factors were identified and analyzed to optimize the daylight illuminance to a adequate level. The results reveal that for optimization, the changes in atrium roof geometry works best in combination with other daylight strategies such as window area, window sill height, light shelf, surface reflectance etc. Atrium in combination with other strategies is found to make significant contribution in daylighting the deeper spaces thereby reducing the use of artificial lighting energy.
  • Development of "Energy Efficient Housing Design"

    Xu, Xin (Cindy); Matter, Fred; Medlin, Larry; Frederickson, Mark (The University of Arizona., 2000)
  • Critical Regionalism

    Roybal, Lori (The University of Arizona., 1998)
  • Criticism Towards Chinese Contemporary Architecture

    Ma, Tianyi; Green, Ellery; Green, Ellery; Matter, Fred; Ott, Randall (The University of Arizona., 1996)
  • An Arts & Crafts Experiment in Sustainable Architecture: Exploring Parallels for Inspiration and Experimentation

    Kauffman, Tim (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    Assuming that there are parallels between Arts and Crafts architecture and sustainable architecture, these parallels should inspire experimentation when creating regional forms of sustainable architecture. An analysis of these parallels presents the design approaches of each type of architecture in the first two sections of this study. Arts and Crafts architecture is taken as the point of origin, and a discussion of sustainable architecture follows. The study includes a summary of the historical context which helped form both sets of ideals in architecture, as well as the important characters who practiced & shaped these ideals. Within the major categories of design approaches presented as parallels, architectural examples and historical background information highlight how these design approaches are embodied within the buildings and designs from each period.The third section studies these parallels in a regional context -the Southwestern U.S., and, in particular, Tucson, Arizona. It describes the context and a brief history of the region and the city itself. Its goal is to present a clearer understanding of the physical, cultural, and architectural forces that should shape any regional approach to sustainable arts and crafts architecture in Tucson.The final section presents the design of a residential house in Tucson as a series of 2- demensional, 8x11 illustrated pages. The process as represented herein can be thought of as the embodied energy of a search for information and inspiration. Ideally, this process of inquiry, design and construction will help to solve some of the environmental problems which face the residents of Tucson, the Southwestern U.S., the country and even the world today and into the future.It is hoped that the establishment of these parallels will highlight an historical precedent for the development of regional, sustainable, and beautiful, small scale residential architecture in the future. It is hoped that the final outcome of this research will contribute to improving the well -being of its occupants and of its site. Ideally, the design process, as documented, will also reflect the artistic ideals and beauty which both the Arts and Crafts movement and the belief in sustainable devlopment share and search for with respect to architecture.
  • Adaptive Reuse: A Proper Way for Chinese Architectural Preservation

    Lin, Xiaojun; Green, Ellery; Green, Ellery; Matter, Fred S.; Yoklic, Martin (The University of Arizona., 1995)
    For many developing countries, a major problem is the challenge of preserving cultural integrity in the face of modernization. On the one hand, these countries have a common goal to develop their national economy and improve standards of living for their people. On the other hand, they need to protect the integrity of the indigenous culture during the process of development which itself often brings in external influences and new lifestyles. Modernization and development require technologies, resources and materials which come from trade and an open economical policy strongly influenced by western culture. Modern western civilization strongly influences the societies, economics and social relations in many developing countries, and can cause major changes in the way of life. As a developing country, China is facing that great challenge today: Is it possible to pursue modernization and at the same time maintain the integrity of culture? This challenge confronts not only scholars and policy makers, but developers, architects and the residents of the communities themselves.
  • Urban Bridge - Ally of the City

    Dobler, David D. (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    THE DYNAMIC, EXPRESSIVE SPIRIT OF BRIDGE DESIGN IN AMERICA IS VANISHING. IN THE ARCHITECTURAL FORM OF THE BRIDGE, THE COMPLEX RELATIONSHIP OF INTEGRATED DESIGN IS DISSOLVING IN THE FACE OF THE SURFACE APPLICATION OF AESTHETIC ELEMENTS. THE PREDOMINANT BRIDGE TYPE TODAY, THE ROADWAY BRIDGE, IS BEING DESIGNED PRIMARILY IN THE CONTEXT OF TRAFFIC ENGINEERING AND UTILITARIAN FUNCTION. ONE MUST QUESTION WHERE THE DYNAMIC BEAUTY, THE EXPRESSIVENESS OF SPAN, THE DREAM FUNCTION OF THE BRIDGE HAS GONE. ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF PURPOSE BY THE BRIDGE DESIGNER BEYOND PURELY UTILITARIAN FUNCTION TO ADDRESS THE BRIDGE'S MANY PURPOSES AND ROLES IS NEEDED. PERHAPS SOME IMPORTANT QUESTIONS NEED TO BE CONSIDERED: WHERE ARE THE INDIVIDUALS, WHAT WERE THE DECISIONS, WHAT WAS THE ENVIRONMENT THAT ONCE ENCOURAGED THE INTEGRATION OF UTILITARIAN FUNCTION AND THE GRACE OF AESTHETIC DESIGN IN BRIDGES? ARE THE CURRENT ALTERNATIVES TO THIS TYPOLOGY OF BRIDGE DESIGN SUFFICIENT, AS THE SYMBOLIC, THE MEANINGFUL, THE AESTHETIC IS DISAPPEARING IN OUR BRIDGES? HENRY PETROSKI IN ENGINEERS OFDREAMSSAID, "WHETHER DESIGNED BY ENGINEER OR ARCHITECT, ARTIST OR BOY SCOUT, EVERY BRIDGE IS A LEGACY TO ITS ENVIRONS AND ITS USERS." THIS THESIS SEEKS TO INVESTIGATE THE ROLE OF THE BRIDGE AS AN URBAN ELEMENT OF GREAT IMPORTANCE; TO INVESTIGATE FACTORS AT PLAY THAT WILL PROMOTE OR PREVENT A RENEWED COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF URBAN BRIDGES AND THE INFRASTRUCTURE THEY REPRESENT. A BRIDGE DESIGN PROJECT AND SUPPORTING INVESTIGATIVE STUDY OF THE HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE OF THE DESIGN OF INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS TODAY WERE THE PRINCIPAL VEHICLES OF THIS STUDY. THE BRIDGE OCCUPIES A CRITICAL ROLE IN OUR INFRASTRUCTURE. MILLIONS OF DOLLARS ARE SPENT ON THESE PROJECTS. WHERE IS THE INFLUENCE OF THE URBAN DESIGN PROFESSIONAL FELT IN THE PROCESS THAT LEADS TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THESE MASSIVE CONTEXTUAL INTERVENTIONS? AS OUR LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE AGES AND TRANSPORTATION REQUIREMENTS MULTIPLY EXPONENTIALLY, WITH THE AUTOMOBILE MAKING AN EVER GREATER IMPACT IN TUCSON, WHO WILL ADVOCATE FOR THE POTENTIAL OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE? WHAT IS THE POTENTIAL OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE? THIS STUDY SEEKS TO PURSUE THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION; WHAT FORCES MUST COME INTO PLAY TO MAKE THE URBAN BRIDGE AN ALLY OF OUR CITY ONCE AGAIN, AND HOW MIGHT A MANIFESTATION OF THIS BRIDGE APPEAR.
  • Virtual Reality as the Ultimate Representation (and Beyond)

    Dakshinamoorthy, Kartik; Matter, Fred; Matter, Fred; Rald, Carl; Blazquez, Oscar (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    Architecture, whether physical or virtual, is the expression of society as a meaningful space. Physical and virtual architecture have their own constraints and context, yet both use architectural organization as a way to order forms and spaces in the environment. Both strive to create meaningful place by defining space [1]. Virtual architecture embodies and expresses values of society in electronic form, with polygons, vectors, and texture maps. This virtual realm enables the designer to deny the physics of time, space, light, and materials and is accessible via computer and human -interface technology anywhere [2]. Virtual Reality, as the ultimate dynamic generation of spatial representations, can be purposefully integrated in the metamorphosis of permanent solid architecture into dynamic representations. The research proposes to achieve an understanding of Virtual Reality and its possible implications on architecture [3]. The role Virtual Reality will play in society in general, and architecture in particular, in the more distant future and Will architects influence the development of Virtual Reality, and if so, how?GOALS Define Virtual Reality Show where VR is heading through an understanding of its gradual evolution. Discuss the technical issues involved in the development of VR technologies. Recent applications of VR technology in architecture. Explore potential future applications of VR technology in architecture. VR technology can be used as a medium for interactive, adaptive and team design in architecture in the future. Architecture could potentially be drastically reshaped by Virtual Reality, and this in turn could reshape VR technology. This will require people who understand the psychological effects of (computer) spaces on people inside them - architects are equipped with such an understanding. Architects as designers of Virtual Worlds /Environments will be required to make these environments rich, interesting and engaging places.
  • Transitions in Architecture

    Ohnrich, Peter; Matter, Fred S.; Matter, Fred S.; Medlin, R. Larry; Schjetnan, Mario; Blazquez, Oscar (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    A city is a structure of single elements that has grown in time and is characterized by political, economical, aesthetic and topographical influences. Looked at it historically, a city is a logical structure, whereas all the single elements add up to a big structure and for each individual city typical overall character. Except for some special and important buildings (mostly churches) the individual buildings interacted with the general city structure and often even with each other. It is my contention that contemporary urban design should work toward the reconstruction of sympathetic interrelationships in urban spaces and buildings. Transitions should be used for interaction to make the pieces work together as a whole. This we experience mainly spatially. But transitions can be achieved in many different layers (social, spatial, thermal...). My research shall help to find out about these different layers individually and how they work together, to define them and finally apply them to a design. The site I chose for the design is the new civic plaza in Tucson, Arizona. The plaza, as part of the Rio Nuevo project, is planned to be the new main plaza for the city with its 800.000 people (year 2000). The site is an empty lot right now; all buildings are roughly laid out in size and function, but not defined in detail. This allows starting the design with the plaza and letting the buildings react to it. Mainly public buildings are supposed to border the plaza. A hotel is located to the east, a parking structure with retail on the north and different museum buildings to the west and south. My goal for the plaza is to create several activity zones of different sizes (spaces for large (outdoor concerts) and small gatherings (private spots within the public space) and different activities (walking, sitting, resting and watching). Different things may happen simultaneously, but also change during a day's or even a year's period of time. Big events like open -air concerts should be possible as well as small events of interaction between few people at the same spot during different times. All these different elements should tie together spatially supported by transitions of material, thermal comfort, light and social aspects and form a big stage of events in a continuous scene. Transitions of different kinds could achieve a change of space without losing the connection to the greater scale. As a person for example is walking from the plaza into a building (museum), he might experience transitions thermally (sun - shade - cooled air and shade - enclosed air - conditioned space) as well as spatially (same floor material inside and outside) or socially as space becomes more and more private (plaza - café area in front of museum - museum lobby - exhibition). As the change of space happens in little steps and each step connects to the previous, a change of space can be achieved without losing the overall gesture. As the plaza is located in the desert, it is important to research the climate as well to be able to establish a good comfort level at specific spaces for people to rest outside within the plaza throughout the year and at different times of day.
  • Critical Analysis of Tradition and Identity in Indian Architecture

    Narayan, Usha; Van Slyck, Abigail; Van Slyck, Abigail; Green, Ellery; Matter, Fred (The University of Arizona., 1993)
  • Passive Solar Possibilities in India

    Chitale, Kapil S.; Matter, Fred S.; Matter, Fred S.; Clark, Kenneth (The University of Arizona., 1986)
    The main purpose or this report is to introduce to those concerned with energy conservation and the building industry the possibility of improving the energy balance between the building envelope and the climate. Passive solar means have been used in improving this balance without relying an any kind of mechanical equipment. The research was carried out in three stages: 1) climate, 2) comfort and 3) design. The first stage was the evaluation of climatic conditions in India, specifically for the two very diverse locations chosen. This evaluation was done with the use of maps, charts, tables, etc., of climatic data to be used. The second stage was comfort. This stage involved the specific needs and lifestyle of the local inhabitant. Envelope design assumptions were made at this stage. The third stage was that of the design process itself. This stage was the result of the combination of the previous two stages, as well as some guidelines of design requirements for India. To be able to demonstrate the effectiveness of passive measures in the performance of the building envelope, case study was done. This study also reflects the reduction in energy consumption to achieve a degree of thermal comfort. There are various architectural concepts in enhancing the performance of a building envelope. Due to this, no definite recommendations have been made. The recommendations could be used as guidelines in achieving a certain degree of improvement. However, with adequate attention paid to detail, a comfortable condition could be achieved.
  • Sustainable Housing: A study of eastern and western approach to sustainability

    Huang, Lei (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    This thesis report is about a comparison between a western approach to sustainable housing and an eastern approach to it. Obviously not only California has an energy crisis. Every corner of the world is talking about sustainability, but people practise it in different ways. In the western world, people tend to be precise; they try to figure out how each strategy contributes to the whole energy conservation, they use computers to calculate the percentage of savings. At the same time the eastern world is using luo pan (an antique tool to indicate time or space) and intuition to achieve life energy, which is called Qi in China. Eastern theory is quite systematic and different from the western one. It believes everything is interrelated. It is set up through thousands of years of practice, it is kind of an experience -based system, so it doesn't sound as logical and explainable as the western method. But it worked and it is working. The purpose of this thesis is to make a comparison between the two, to see how each method works in the same design, which is in the same site located in Tucson.I divided this thesis into two parts; the first part is the eastern approach to sustainable housing. I explained this approach by doing a Fengshui design at a site in Tucson. To help the readers better understand the design, I put in some Fengshui background knowledge and some real Fengshui cases along with their explanations. There are more methods in Fengshui practice; the Fengshui background knowledge covers only the methods I used in this design. Further practice knowledge or experience is available from Fengshui masters. The second part is the western approach to sustainable housing. It is achieved by using six individual strategies. I used the Calpas 3.0 computer program to calculate how each strategy contributes to the energy conservation, and the total amount of combined savings is provided. In the conclusion, I discuss the comparison of the results that come out from the different methods. In such a way, the reader of this thesis report will have a clear idea how the eastern and western cultures differ and where they are similar with each other.
  • Prototype School Classroom for NTSD Elementary #13

    Carver, Thomas F. (The University of Arizona., 1995)
  • Modern Trends in Resort Architecture

    Nicolosi, Danielle (The University of Arizona., 1999)

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