ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics is a publication of the Linguistics Circle, the Graduate Student Organization of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Arizona.

Volume 9: Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics from A-Z. (1995). Edited by Colleen M. Fitzgerald and Andrea Heiberg.


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Contact Coyote Papers at coyotepapers@gmail.com.

Recent Submissions

  • Evidence from Modern Greek for Refinement of the OCP

    Meador, Diane; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • "PRO Analysis" for Subject-Oriented Secondary Predicates

    Ikawa, Hisako; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • Deriving Ternarity

    Hammond, Michael; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
    Introduction: Ternary stress patterns have posed a problem for a parametric metrical theory for some time. In this paper, it is argued that ternary systems can be derived in an explanatory fashion from binary systems. The basic idea is that ternary stress systems can be analyzed as binary stress systems if the theory of extrametricality is enriched. Two specific proposals regarding extrametricality are made. First, extrametricality must be tolerated not just at the edge of morphological and syntactic constituents, but also at the edge of phonological constituents. Second, extrametricality can be lost if adjacent feet are subminimal. The organization of this paper is as follows. First, the foot typology is briefly reviewed. Then the theory of extrametricality is presented. It is argued that regardless of the analysis of ternary systems, the theory of extrametricality must be enriched as outlined above. Four metrical systems are then considered: Cayuvava, Chugach, Winnebago, and Estonian. Each of these systems provides arguments for deriving ternarity as proposed here.
  • Arapaho Accent

    Fountain, Amy; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
    Introduction: Arapaho is an Algonquian language spoken by a population of about 3500 in Wyoming and Oklahoma (Salzmann 1983). The accent system of Arapaho is quite complex and presents a challenge to any theory of stress/accent which attempts to account for these phenomena in a derivational manner (Salzmann 1965, Tsay 1989). In this essay it is argued that Arapaho accent involves both lexical and derivational aspects. In section 2, the phonetic characteristics of Arapaho accent are outlined. Section 3 briefly overviews Idsardi's (1992) theory of the computation of stress. In section 4, the Arapaho data are presented and the crucial generalizations are stated. Section 5 contains an analysis of these facts, utilizing Idcardi's theory. An alternative analysis is offered in section 6, and finally in section 7 the theoretical implications of the Arapaho facts are discussed.
  • The Meter of Tohono O'odham Songs

    Fitzgerald, Colleen M.; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • Coyote Papers: Volume 9 (1995)

    Unknown author (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)