• Chemical Control of the Sweetpotato Whitefly in Cotton

      Watson, T. F.; Telles, A.; Peña, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Various registered and experimental insecticides were evaluated for sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius) control in several field experiments at Yuma, Arizona in 1993. Best controls were obtained with insecticide mixtures, particularly a pyrethroid and an organophosphate, rather than with individual materials. Results of these experiments indicate that severe population densities can be controlled using insecticide combinations, even though sustained use of these insecticides would probably lead quickly to the development of resistance.
    • Action Thresholds for Whiteflies in Arizona

      Ellsworth, Peter C.; Meade, Donna L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Three field tests were set -up for evaluation of action threshold levels for sweetpotato whitefly control with two different chemical combinations. The thresholds used to initiate treatments were ca. 1, 10, and 25 adult whiteflies per leaf designated as "early ", "moderate ", or "late ". Immatures were present during these treatment initiation points at the rate of ca. 5 nymphs and ca. 10 eggs per sq.in. in the 'early' plots, 15.3 nymphs and 39.1 eggs per sq.in. in the 'moderate' plots, and 52.1 nymphs and 299.3 eggs per sq.in. in the 'late' plots. The insecticides used included a pyrethroid combination [Danitol® (.1 lb a.i/A) + Orthene® (.5)] and a non-pyrethroid combination [endosulfan(.75) + Ovasyn® (.25)1 Applications were by ground, broadcast, over-the-top, at 20 GPA. Populations were monitored as whitefly adults (leaf turns & net sweeps) and nymphs and eggs (leaf counts). Once applications were triggered, they continued ca. weekly. The early threshold required seven applications, starting 10 July, and produced yields (4038.8 lbs seed cotton/A) which were 2 or 3 times larger than the untreated check (1589.3 lbs seed cotton/A). Lint or leaf stickiness was not apparent; however, 2 or 3 sprays were required before any significant differences in whitefly populations could be found. Whitefly numbers were lowered significantly in both insecticide regimens, with somewhat lower numbers present in the pyrethroid treated plots. The late threshold was sprayed only twice, starting 12 August, and yielded no more cotton (1719.2 lbs seed cotton/A) than the untreated check (1395.0 lbs seed cotton/A). Lint and leaf surfaces were covered in stickiness and sooty mold. Whitefly populations were excessive and led to premature cut -out and poor fruit retention. The moderate threshold (10 adults per leaf) received five applications, starting 22 July, and produced high yielding and high quality cotton (3462.2 lbs seed cotton/A). Some stickiness and sooty mold growth was observable only on the lowest leaves. This was a result of limited honeydew production prior to the threshold and well before any boll opening. Lygus populations were extremely high and caused large differences in yields which favored the pyrethroid combination slightly and the earliest threshold significantly. Given commercial farm control realities (e.g., delays in sampling or application, differences in coverage or application, variable efficacy), the ideal threshold for initiation of treatments is likely between 1 and 10 adults per leaf.
    • Short Staple Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1993

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Fifty three short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. HS SAL 10, a long season variety, was the highest yielding variety in the trial with a lint yield of 1772 pounds per acre. Average yields in this trial were lower than in 1992, even though there were more heat units during the growing season. HVI data for the varieties in the trial are included in this report.
    • Defoliation of Pima and Upland Cotton at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1993

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Odom, P. N.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Experiments were effected on both Pima and upland cotton to compare the defoliation effects of Ginstar, Starfire and sodium chlorate with an untreated check Weather conditions after treatment applications were recorded and observations taken after one week and two weeks. Grab samples were taken from the picker to determine percent trash and to run HVI analyses.
    • 1993 Weather Conditions

      Brown, P.; Russell, B.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Abnormally high January and February rainfall will certainly be the most remember meteorological feature of 1993. This rainfall led to extensive flooding along the Gila River and its tributaries, and delayed field preparation in many areas. However, once the winter rains ended, weather conditions proved very favorable for cotton production. Warm, dry spring weather helped get the cotton crop off to a good start. Moderate summer temperatures and a late monsoon provided excellent weather conditions for setting fruit. The relatively short monsoon period was followed by an extended period of mild, dry weather which provided excellent conditions for finishing the crop. The only blemish on the fall weather pattern was a period of heavy rainfall in mid - November which delayed field operations in much of central Arizona.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstrations, Graham County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Two on farm, replicated short staple variety demonstrations were established in 1993. Twelve varieties were evaluated in one location and fifteen varieties were evaluated at the other. Delta Pine 90 was the highest yielding variety at one location with a yield of 1387 pounds of lint per acre and Stoneville LA 887 was the highest yielding variety at the other location with a yield of 1134 pounds of lint per acre.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Ten short staple cotton varieties including four New Mexico acalas, one New Mexico experimental acala, three California acalas, one hybrid acala and a rust resistant variety from Mexico were tested in the 1993 variety study. The highest yielding variety was Maxxa with a lint yield of 832 pounds per acre. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, boll weights, plant heights and plant populations are shown. Average boll weights are compared between this location and three other elevations varying from 1400 feet to 4100 feet above sea level.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One trial, north of Kansas Settlement, tested nine acalas and one rust resistant variety from Mexico. The other trial, south of Kansas Settlement and east of Pearce, tested three acalas and nine upland varieties. Top yielding varieties were Maxxa, in the acala trial and DPL 2056 in the upland trial. Yields were lower than expected due to adverse weather conditions, including hail.
    • The 1994 Arizona Cotton Advisory Program

      Brown, P.; Russell, B.; Silvertooth, J.; Ellsworth, P.; Stedman, S.; Thacker, G.; Hood, L.; Husman, S.; Cluff, R.; Howell, D.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Arizona Cooperative Extension generates and distributes weather -based Planting Date and Cotton Development Advisories for 11 cotton production areas (Marana, Laveen, Paloma, Litchfield Pk., Pinal Co., Parker, Mohave Valley, Queen Creek, Safford, Yuma Valley, and Aguila). Planting Date Advisories are distributed from mid -February through the end of April and stress 1) planting cotton varieties according to heat unit accumulations rather than calendar date and 2) the importance of soil temperature to good germination. Cotton Development Advisories are distributed from early May through mid -September and provide updates on crop development, insects, weather and agronomy. The Cotton Advisory Program will continue in 1994 and growers may obtain the advisories by mail (fax only in Yuma County only) from the local county extension office or by computer from the AZMET computer bulletin board.
    • Cultural and Management Practices for Pima Cotton Production

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The good use of cultural or agronomic practices is fundamental to the production of high yields and quality of American Pima cotton. In order for Pima farmers to maintain viable production operations, a continual review and improvement upon the existing set of cultural practices are in order. Basic aspects of crop production such as planting date management, soil fertility and plant nutrition, plant growth regulator use, crop termination, and defoliation are reviewed in this paper in relation to American Pima cotton production. Specific attention is also given to potassium (K) fertility management and Alternaria leaf spot regarding new aspects of potential management needs.
    • Boll Sampling to Predict Lint Yield in Upland and Pima Cotton

      Unrah, Bryan L.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Giving a cotton (Gossypium spp.) producer a method to predict lint yield, would be a useful management tool. The objective of this study was to determine if relatively simple measurements could be made near cut -out which could be used to adequately estimate lint yield for Upland (G. hirsutum L.) and Pima (G. barbadense L.) cotton. Data and samples were collected from the nitrogen (N) management study at Maricopa Ag. Center from two N treatments which were imposed on both Upland (var. DPL 5415) and Pima (var. S-7) cotton. The treatments were no added N and N added on an as- needed basis. Twenty hard -green bolls from the first or second fruiting positions were collected from each plot on 19 August 1993. The number of bolls expected to reach maturity prior to crop termination were then determined from five randomly selected plants in each plot. Measurements on each boll collected included fresh weight, diameter, number of locks, number of seeds, and dry seed cotton weight. Plant population was determined from early season stand counts. Seed cotton per boll was most highly correlated to boll weight for DPL 5415 and for Pima S-7 it was most highly correlated with boll diameter. These respective parameters were then used in linear regression to predict seed cotton /boll. Lint yield calculated from the regression models (using boll weight or diameter) and yield calculated from means of the data collected agreed quit well. Predicted yields from regression analysis overestimated the actual Upland yield by about 730 lb lint /acre and under estimated Pima yields to within about 150 lb lint /acre. It appears that this procedure has the potential to estimate lint yields to within about 150 lb lint /acre. However the sampling scheme will he refined especially in regard to estimation of plants /acre and bolls /plant which should improve yield estimate accuracy.
    • Evaluation of Date of Planting on the Yield of Several Upland Varieties at Marana, 1993

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Brown, P. W.; Norton, E. R.; Unrah, B. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A single field experiment was conducted in 1993 at Marana, Arizona (2,000 ft. elevation) to evaluate the response of three Upland cotton varieties to three dates of planting. Planting dates ranged from as early as 6 April to 11 May. Planting date was a significant effect for all varieties and revealed a substantial drop in yield with delays past 20 April in 1993, which corresponded to 568 heat units (HU, 86/55 °F thresholds) accumulated since 1 January.
    • Upland Cotton Variety Resposne to Row Spacing

      Husman, S. H.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Jech, L. E.; Wegener, R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      An Upland cotton row spacing study evaluation 30 in. vs. 38 in. rows was conducted in the Gila Valley of western Maricopa County in 1993. In addition, six Upland varieties were also evaluated on both the 30 and 38 in. row configurations. There were no row spacing differences in yield among five of the six varieties. Sure Grow 1001 had significantly lower lint yields when produced on 30 In. rows. DPL 5415 had significantly higher lint yields that the other five tested varieties on 38 in. rows. There were no variety differences in the 30 in. rows.
    • 1993 Cotton Seed Treatment Evaluations

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Cottonseed was treated with several fungicide treatments in an effort to protect the seed and seedling from disease. Seed germination and vigor was evaluated in three Arizona locations; Maricopa, Marana, and Safford. Stand counts were taken on two separate dates after emergence and percent emergence was calculated. Among the three locations only one, Marana, showed significant differences among treatments. The highest percent emergence being seeds treated with Nu-Flow ND at a rate of 7.5 fl oz/cwt. The untreated control placed last in the ranking at this location.
    • Validity of the Pinhead Square Treatment Program for Pink Bollworm Suppression and Impact of Several Insecticides on Arthropod Fauna in Cotton

      Ellsworth, Peter C.; Meade, Donna L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A limited chemical control tactic known as pinhead square treatment has gained recent Favor as a component of pink bollworm population management. The strategy has economic and ecologic goals of using reduced insecticides early in the season (to include lower rates, half the acreage, and less potent chemistry) in order to reduce later season risk of pink bollworm infestations. This strategy also depends in part on the cultural tactic which results in "suicidal emergence" of overwintering pink bollworms through optimal planting date management. The combination of these tactics has been used in the past to overcome boll weevil populations area-wide. This study is focused on the evaluation of this system as a basis for pink bollworm suppression. Though only preliminary is presented here, it is clear that there are numerous insects impacted by this practice which interact in complex ways to influence pest populations of all kinds. Furthermore, the fate of such a practice in any production system is also influenced by the specific chemical agent used. This experiment details the use of four different classes of insecticide chemistry as well as one bioinsecticide. The experiment has been duplicated in 1993; however, only 1992 data are shown here.
    • Control of Sweepotato (Silverleaf) Whitefly, Bemisia Tabaci, on Cotton in Paloma, Arizona

      El-Lissy, O.; Antilla, L.; Staten, R. T.; Leggett, J. E.; Walters, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Arizona Cotton Research and Protection Council, Phoenix, AZ; USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Phoenix, AZ; USDA-ARS-Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A large scale for the control of sweetpotato (silverleaf) whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, (SPW) was carried out in Paloma and Painted Rock near Gila Bend, Arizona, on approximately 6,156 ha of cotton during the 1993 season. Within the program area 40 fields were randomly selected for comparison with 15 fields in each of 2 locations outside the program. They were identified as check east (approximately 11 k northeast of the program) and check west (approximately 3 k west of the program). Whitefly populations in both check areas were controlled according to individual grower protocol. On a weekly basis, adult counts were taken from all 4 edges and the centers of each field using the oil pan technique. Insecticides were applied aerially in the program area on the full field or edges based on population density recorded from pan samples. Insecticide combinations were rotated weekly in an attempt to reduce the potential for the development of pesticide resistance. During the 16 -week evaluation period SPW adults were significantly higher in check east and check west than the program area by 2- and 6-fold respectively; eggs were higher by 3- and 39 fold, respectively; and nymphs were also significantly higher in check east and check west by 3- and 60-fold respectively. Ginning records for 1993 indicate approximately a 20% increase in yield in the program area a 5% increase in check east and a 40% decrease in check west as compared to 1992. These results demonstrate that an area -wide approach, utilizing edge treatment where possible, based on extensive field sampling regimens represent an important integrated strategy in a successful whitefly control program.
    • Evaluation of Trap Crops as a Component of a Community-Wide Pink Bollworm Control Program

      Thacker, Gary W.; Moore, Leon; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Combs, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Trap crops were evaluated as a part of a community -wide pink bollworm (PBW) control program. We measured extraordinarily high numbers of PBW larvae in the trap crops in 1992, which indicated that the trap crops were attracting PBW moths from wide areas. However, we have no direct way of measuring any effect this would have on the main crop. Overall PBW populations were very low in 1993. While PBW numbers drastically declined in the community, this study offers no conclusive evidence as to whether trap crops are an effective component of a community-wide IPM program.
    • Sweetpotato Whitefly (Bemisia Tabaci Gennadius) Population Relationships to Cotton Yield and Quality

      Chu, C. C.; Henneberry, T. J.; Akey, D. H.; Prabhaker, N.; Perkins, H. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Sweetpotato whitefly (SPWF) Bemisia tabaci Gennadius strain B has been a devastating pest of cotton in Arizona and California in recent years. Management systems involving cultural procedures, SPWF population monitoring crop sanitation, crop sequencing chemical control and other technology are developing slowly. SPWF population information in relation to cotton yield and quality losses are urgently needed Preliminary studies with cotton insecticide treatments initiated each week from shortly after cotton seedling emergence to late in the cotton season were conducted at the Irrigated Desert Research Station, Brawley, CA in 1993. The results suggest significant correlations for numbers of SPWF per leaf disc from cotton leaves vs. cotton yield and lint stickiness. Cotton lint yield was negatively correlated to all stages of SPWF populations (-0.783 or higher). Lint stickiness was high positively correlated to SPWF populations (0.707 or higher) and cotton defoliation was positively correlated to SPWF populations (0.876 or higher).
    • A Community-wide Approach to Whitefly Management

      Diehl, J. W.; Ellsworth, P. C.; Husman, S. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      An extension supported, grower controlled, community pest management group was initiated in the Laveen and Tolleson communities of Arizona with the management of sweetpotato whitefly (SPWF) as its initial focus. The three functions of this group were awareness, communication, and cooperation. Increased awareness and communication of pest management problems and solutions were achieved through regular meetings and newsletters. Community cooperation took the form of a community-based overwintering survey and a sticky trap network. These two cooperative activities served both an educational and a research function. From the overwintering survey and the sticky trap network, growers learned about the overwintering habits and movement dynamics of whiteflies in their area, the limits of sticky traps for SPWF detection, the need for the reduction of SPWF populations before they move onto cotton. and the need for careful infield sampling of SPWF populations.
    • Numerical and Binomial Sequential Sampling Plans for Adult Bemisia Tabaci in Cotton

      Naranjo, S. E.; Flint, H. M.; Henneberry, T. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Fixed-precision numerical and binomial sequential sampling plans are reported for adults of Bemisia tabaci (Strain B) on cotton. Both plans are based on whole leaf sample units from the fifth mainstem node (counted from the terminal). Numerical sampling plans allow for the efficient estimation of adult population density. Numerical sampling stop lines are presented relating the cumulative number of adults counted to the number of leaves examined for two levels of statistical precision. Binomial plans were developed to allow classification of adult population density for pest management decision -making application. These plans were devised for three action threshold levels; 5, 10 or 15 adults per leaf Binomial sampling stop lines are presented relating the cumulative number of infested leaves to the number of leaves examined as an aid for determining the need for population suppression.