ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The Cotton Report is one of several commodity-based agricultural research reports published by the University of Arizona.

This report, along with the Forage and Grain Report, was established by Hank Brubaker, Extension Agronomist, after seeing a similar report published by Texas A&M University in the mid-1970’s.

The purpose of the report is to provide an annual research update to farmers, researchers, and those in the agricultural industry. The research is conducted by University of Arizona and USDA-ARS scientists.

Both historical and current Cotton Reports have been made available in the UA Campus Repository as part of a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the University Libraries.

Other commodity-based agricultural research reports available in the UA Campus Repository include:
Citrus Reports | Forage & Grain Reports | Sugarbeet Reports | Turfgrass Reports | Vegetable Reports


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Contents for Cotton Report 1986

Recent Submissions

  • Publications

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
  • Harvesting Progress in 1985

    Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
  • Heat Units and Stages of Plant Development

    Fisher, W. D.; Pegelow, E. J.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
  • Soil Amendment Demonstration on Cotton, Greenlee County

    Tyler, Ray; DeRosa, Edith; Clark, Lee J.; Doerge, Tom; Stroehlein, Jack; Hansson, Bengt; Department of Soils; University of Agriculture in Sweden; Boliden Corp. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Boligrow (an aluminum sulfate material from Sweden), gypsum and soil sulfur were evaluated as amendments on soil where differential water uptake had historically been a problem. A crop of cotton was grown and the yield of cotton was taken to determine if an economical change was effected by the amendments. Statistically there was no difference between treatments. A soil analysis indicated that sodium was not a problem in this soil, so texture was probably more related to the differential water uptake problem than was the chemical makeup of the soil.
  • Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer Application on Cotton Yields, Safford Agricultural Center

    Clark, Lee J.; Gardner, Bryant R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    A soil depleted of nitrogen by cropping with Sudan grass and removing all the residues was planted to Upland (DP 90) and Pima (S-6) cotton. Nitrogen was added in the form of urea at three different stages of plant growth, applying a total of 0, 50 or 100 pounds of nitrogen. The yield of lint from DP 90 was increased where nitrogen was added; however, there were no differences in yield with the timing nor total amount of nitrogen added. In the case of S-6, fertilizer nitrogen did not increase yield.
  • Early Insect Control in Cotton, Greenlee County

    Tyler, Ray; DeRosa, Edith; Clark, Lee J.; Moore, Leon (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Cotton was treated at the pinhead square stage with Orthene to prevent boll shed caused by thrips and Lygus. Yield results showed no statistically significant differences, even though yield trends indicated a decrease in the treated plots compared to the check. Severe pressure from Heliothus later in the season and the yield trends would indicate that the insecticide treatment effect on the beneficial insects was more important than its effect on thrips and Lygus.
  • Time for Development of Eretmocerus mundus, a Parasite of the Sweet Potato Whitefly from Jordan

    Butler, G. D. Jr.; Western Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Development of this sweet potato whitefly parasite from egg to adult varied from 47.5 days at 17.5 °C to 14.0 days at 30.0 °C. Development of the parasite was faster than that of its whitefly host.
  • Spring Build-Up of Whiteflies in Central Arizona

    Butler, G. D. Jr.; Western Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    The sweet potato whitefly and banded winged whitefly overwinter and build up in the spring on globe mallow, cheeseweed, and alfalfa in the Tempe, Arizona area. During 1984, the banded winged whitefly was observed to be more abundant on these weeds than the sweet potato whitefly.
  • Whitefly Adults in Okra-Leaf and Normal-Leaf Cottons

    Butler, G. D. Jr.; Wilson, F. D.; Western Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    The sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) continues to be a serious pest of cotton and an important vector of several virus diseases of fall vegetables. In our search for germplasm resistant to the whitefly, we observed that okra-leaf selections of ST-8701N and ST-8737N had fewer adult whiteflies. La Okra 5-5 had fewer whiteflies than the normal-leaf Stoneville 213. Thus, okra-leaf selections appear to offer some resistance to the whitefly.
  • Comparative Trap Catches in Four Boll Weevil Trap Types

    Meng, T. Jr.; Bariola, L. A.; Henneberry, T. J.; Western Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Four trap types were used to trap boll weevils at 1 m heights, with and without grandlure, and 2 trap types were compared at 0.5 m height, with and without grandlure. The results indicate trap height may be an important factor in boll weevil catches at certain times during the cotton season. Also trap color, design and other factors may influence trap catches since traps not baited with grandlure caught high numbers of boll weevils during certain times during the cotton growing season.
  • Report on the Effect of PREP on Cotton Fruiting, Boll Opening, and Boll Weevil Populations

    Henneberry, T. J.; Bariola, L. A.; Leggett, J. E.; Meng, T.; Akey, D.; Deeter, B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
  • Using Plant Growth Regulators to Control Pink Bollworms and Boll Weevils

    Bariola, Louis A.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
  • Field Tests of Shin-Etsu Gossyplure Dispenser in the Imperial Valley, CA

    Staten, R. T.; Flint, H. M.; Finnell, Claude; Weddele, Dick; Imperial County Agricultural Commission (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    The use of Shin-Etsu gossyplure dispensers at a rate of 400/acre (30 g AI/acre) in cotton fields in the Imperial Valley of California reduced the use of insecticides by approximately 40% compared to fields treated with insecticides only, a highly significant reduction.
  • Pink Bollworm Treatment Levels and Pesticide Efficacy Evaluation Based on Egg Infestations

    Hutchinson, W. D.; Henneberry, T. J.; Martin, J. M.; Beasley, C. A.; Western Cotton Research Lab; University of California (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Pink bollworm (PBW) moths, eggs, and larvae were monitored in three commercial cotton fields during 1985 to assess the potential for using PBW egg infestations to determine when to spray and for evaluating insecticide efficacy. Based on 1985 data, PBW oviposition patterns provided a more consistent estimate of insecticide efficacy than male moth trap catches. Egg/larval relationships indicated treatments based on egg infestations would have, in many cases, provided a 2 to 4 day advantage over actual treatment dates based on larval infestations.
  • A Presence/Absence Sampling Plan for Pink Bollworm Eggs in Cotton

    Hutchinson, W. D.; Henneberry, T. J.; Martin, J. M.; Beasley, C. A.; Western Cotton Research Lab; University of California (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    A new monitoring approach for the pink bollworm (PBW) was developed where only the presence or absence of one or more viable eggs/boll must be determined. Since individual eggs do not have to be counted, an experienced checker can examine a 25-boll sample in approximately 12 minutes. To use egg sampling for making treatment decisions, it is recommended that 3 to 4 25 -boll samples be taken per field.
  • Rationale for Sampling Pink Bollworm Eggs in Cotton Management Programs

    Hutchinson, William D.; Western Cotton Research Lab (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Management decisions for pink bollworm (PBW) control, based on larval infestation levels, are hindered by an inherent time lag between the period of increasing adult populations (primary target stage) and when treatments are actually applied (typically 6 to 10 days). It is suggested that this time lag is too long in many cases for optimal control; i.e., larval infestations may become well established between applications. An alternative approach based on monitoring PBW eggs laid on bolls is presented.
  • Comparison of Three and Four Bract Squares on Several Deltapine Cultivars

    Terry, Irene (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    The number of three and four bract squares on several currently used Deltapine cultivars were observed during the early squaring period in plots untreated and treated for early season insect control. The percent of four bract healthy squares counted in June were higher in Deltapine 41 than several other varieties including Deltapine 90. The percent of four bracts between treated and untreated plots were significantly different in only two out of 5 locations. In another test where both DP 90 and DP 61 were compared for total healthy plus shed squares, DP 90 and DP 61 were equal on several dates in their proportion of three and four bract squares.
  • Pheromone and Insecticide Treatments of Nectariless and Nataried Varieties

    Flint, H. M.; Wilson, F. D.; Curtice, N. J.; Western Cotton Research Lab (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    The pink bollworm resistant (nectariless) variety 'Deltapine NSL' yielded as much lint as the standard 'Deltapine-61' (nectaried) under treatments of conventional insecticides or gossyplure and yielded significantly more lint in untreated plots.
  • Fruit Set Response of Cotton Varity DP-90 to Early Season Insecticide Application

    Barstow, Ben (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Nodes to first square and number of fruit in early fruiting positions were evaluated in Pinal County early season insecticide trials. Acephate treatments increased the number of fruit in early fruiting positions at three of four locations. Two of these same locations also received sidedressed aldicarb applications, but no significant response to aldicarb was observed.
  • Early Season Insect Control: Effects on Cotton Variety Yield and Fruiting

    Terry, Irene; Barstow, Ben; Arizona Cooperative Extension Service (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    Many cotton field trials were conducted in central Arizona to compare various early season pesticide treatments on several commercially available cultivars for plant growth responses and thrips control. Treated plots received either aldicarb (Temik), at planting or first square, or acephate (Orthene), one to three foliar applications during early squaring. Although results were quite variable, general trends included: most treatments did reduce thrips populations; fewer shed squares occurred in plots treated at first square; plants compensated for this square shed; treated plots may be earlier in boll production than untreated areas; and most tests showed no statistical differences in healthy square production or in yield.

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