The Vegetable Report is one of several commodity-based agricultural research reports published by the University of Arizona.

This report was first published in 1965.

The purpose of the report is to provide an annual research update to farmers, researchers, and those in the agricultural industry. The research is conducted by University of Arizona and USDA-ARS scientists.

Both historical and current Vegetable Reports have been made available via the UA Campus Repository, as part of a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the University Libraries.

If you have questions about the Vegetable Reports, email pubs@ag.arizona.edu. You can also visit the CALS Publications website for additional information.

Other commodity-based agricultural research reports available in the UA Campus Repository include: Citrus Reports, Cotton Reports, Forage & Grain Reports, Sugarbeet Reports, and Turfgrass Reports.

Contents for Vegetable Report 1965

Recent Submissions

  • Vegetable Growers Association Memorial Scholarships

    Fazio, Steve (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Teaching Program in Vegetable Crops

    Fazio, Steve (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Vegetable Crops Extension Program

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Labor Requirements for Vegetable Crops in Arizona

    Pawson, Walter (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Low Volume Spray Applications of Technical Malathion to Vegetable Crops

    Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    An experimental application of technical grade malathion was made by helicopter to a mixed planting of vegetables on the University of Arizona Mesa Experiment Station. Technical malathion at the rate of one pint per acre was not phytotoxic to onions, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. This dosage did not satisfactorily control cabbage loopers and beet armyworms.
  • Bacterial Soft-Rot of Vegetables

    Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    A highly virulent bacterial isolate was obtained from Arizona vegetables. Pathogenicity and physiological studies were made in an effort to correctly identify the isolate.
  • Feasibility of Protectice Cropping (Plastic Greenhouse Production) in Central Arizona

    Foerman, B. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    After commercial production on a trial basis during a four-year period (1961-65), protective cropping of tomatoes and possibly a few other higher return vegetable crops shows a promising alternative enterprise for local production whosever risks are intensified. Better adapted varieties, disease control and market development are primary objectives to be overcome.
  • Estimated Use of Plant Nutrients in Arizona, by Crops

    Pawson, W. W.; Stanberry, C. O.; Fuller, W. H.; Tucker, T. C.; Pew, W. D.; Hillman, J. S. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Effects of Treatments on the Postharvest Senescence of Green Leaves

    Bessey, Paul M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Curly Top Resistant Tomato Variety Observations

    Oebker, N. F.; Davison, Arlen; Bears, John (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    The performances of four curly top resistant tomato varieties were observed in Arizona during the period 1961 to 1964. Owyhee showed resistance but produced small fruits. Breeding line No. 126 and its improved replacement VF 122, had field resistance, but VF 122 did not set fruit as well as other varieties under high temperature conditions. Payette appeared to be the most promising of the varieties tried. It showed better resistance than Owyhee and produced good yields of desirable fruit when staked and trained properly.
  • Fall Armyworm Control on Sweet Corn with Granular Insecticide

    Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Several seasons of work indicate that topical application of granular pesticides to the whorl of fall grown sweet corn will effectively control the fall armyworm. First application to be made when the corn is approximately 12 inches high, followed by one or two additional applications at intervals of one week. The following three materials: 5 percent Diazinon granular, 5 percent Zectran granular, and 2 percent Endrin granular are the most promising when applied at 20-30 pounds per acre.
  • Yuma Sweet Corn Variety Trials

    Oebker, N. F.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Eighteen sweet corn hybrids were compared in the Yuma Valley in the spring of 1961. Golden Cross Bantam, especially the 51-T strain, gave the best overall performance.
  • Chili Pepper Variety Trials

    Oebker, N. F.; Page, Carmy G. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Results from pepper variety tests across the state indicate that New Mexico 6-4, Rio Grande 21 and Sandia A are desirable varieties to grow in Arizona. Which variety to select will depend on use, location and individual preferences. No variety in the tests was found suitable for growing for paprika.
  • Economic Feasibility of Chili Production in Northern Arizona

    Farrish, Raymond O. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
  • Response of Dry Onions to Varying Levels of Soil Moisture

    Pew, W. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Onions respond favorably to increasing levels of soil moisture as measured by increase in bulb size and total yields. Maintaining a soil moisture level of 18-20 centibars of tension (nearly field-holding capacity) produces the greatest yields of bulbs. However, dry onions so produced are somewhat softer in texture, tended toward thick -neck growth, matured slower, and are more difficult to cure adequately in the normal length of time. Onions grown on lesser amounts of water tend to have the reverse characteristics. Costs of production are similarly increased under high soil moisture levels because of the need for replacing nitrogen leached out of the root zone. Also, the costs of the water and its application must be increased. Therefore, the economics involved would be a required consideration.
  • Irrigation Studies with Carrots

    Pew, W. D.; Park, J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Data from four years of irrigation studies with carrots indicate this crop has a rather wide tolerance to varying soil moisture levels as measured by yield and quality of roots. Yields have varied between treatments from 514 to 665 crates per acre. Soil moisture levels ranging from a very wet level (18-20 centibars of tension) to a dry level (75-80 centibars of tension) have shown no significant differences in yield. Only from treatment 5, the very dry schedule, was the yield significantly lower than for all other treatments.
  • Insect Control on Cabbage with New Pesticide Compounds

    Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    A number of different chemicals have been evaluated for control of cabbage loopers and other lepidopterous pests of cole crops over the past several years. These materials are usually formulated as dusts or emulsifiable concentrates but some have been prepared as wettable powders or granular formulations. Some are more effective against one species of insect than another. Only a very few of the prospective pesticides passed all the required testing and became available commercially.
  • Irrigation Trials with Cabbage

    Pew, W. D.; Park, J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    The influences of soil moisture are pronounced in cabbage grown under Arizona's semiarid conditions. An understanding of these effects is a must if the most effective cabbage production is to be achieved. High, constant levels of moisture reduces solidity, increases apparent size, reduces color and general market acceptance. On the other hand, dry soil moisture conditions increases solidity and color and reduces size and generally impairs market quality because of the smallness of size and the tough and woody texture of the cabbage thus produced. Best quality cabbage commensurate with acceptable yields and greatest effectiveness is obtained where moisture is kept at 75-80 centibars of tension.
  • Potato Soft-Rot Diseases

    Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    Investigations on the problem of black-leg and tuber rots have revealed an interaction between two pathogenic organisms, a bacterial species and Pythium aphanidermatum.

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