ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The Forage and Grain Report is one of several commodity-based agricultural research reports published by the University of Arizona.

This report, along with the Cotton Report, was established by Hank Brubaker, Extension Agronomist, after seeing a similar report published by Texas A&M University in the mid-1970’s.

The purpose of the report is to provide an annual research update to farmers, researchers, and those in the agricultural industry. The research is conducted by University of Arizona and USDA-ARS scientists.

Both historical and current Forage and Grain Reports have been made available in the UA Campus Repository as part of a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the University Libraries.

Other commodity-based agricultural research reports available in the UA Campus Repository include:
Cotton Reports | Citrus Reports | Sugarbeet Reports | Turfgrass Reports | Vegetable Reports


QUESTIONS?

Mike Ottman is the current editor of the Forage and Grain Reports. Contact CALS Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu, or visit the CALS Publications website.


Contents for Forage & Grain Report 2001

Alfalfa
Insects Varieties Barley and Wheat
Irrigation Varieties Weeds Dry Beans Sorghum

Recent Submissions

  • Grain Sorghum Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 2000

    Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Four mid- to full-seasoned grain sorghum hybrids were compared in a replicated trial planted on the Jones farm in the Duncan-Virden valley. Dekalb 66 was the highest yielding variety with a yield over 7000 pounds per acre.
  • 2000 National Cooperative Dry Bean Nursery

    Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    This report contains the results of the 2000 National Cooperative Dry Bean Nursery Trials. This replicated, small plot trial contains thirty eight varieties of nine different bean classes. Buster, a pinto variety from Seminis Vegetable Seed Company, was the highest yielding variety in the study with a yield near 4000 pounds per acre. Yields, aerial biomass, harvest index, and 100 bean weights are reported for this study.
  • Evaluation of Herbicides for the Control of Littleseed Canarygrass in Wheat

    Tickes, B.; Ottman, Michael J.; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    There are currently three herbicides registered for the control of littleseed canarygrass in the desert southwest. Hoelon was used with marginal success from 1982 to 1999. In 1999, Achieve was registered in Arizona and Puma was registered in California for the control of this weed in wheat and barley. Both have produced good to excellent levels of control (75 to 95 percent) in our tests and under commercial conditions. Two newer herbicides, Olympus (formerly Bayer MKH6561) and F130060 (Aventis) are being developed and have produced excellent levels of canarygrass control in our tests with less crop safety.
  • Small Grain Variety Trials at the Safford Agricultural Center, 2001

    Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Small plot replicate trials were established to test thirteen durum wheat varieties, four varieties of bread/feed wheat and six varieties of barley. Platinum, from World Wide Wheat, was the leading durum wheat variety with a yield of 3496 pounds per acre and YU 995-241, from Western Plant Breeders, the highest yielding bread/feed wheat variety with 5546 pounds per acre. #3 was the highest yielding barley variety with a yield of 6353 pounds per acre.
  • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Arizona City, Eloy, Gillespie, Maricopa, and Wellton, 2001

    Ottman, M. J.; Rogers, M. T.; Clay, P. A.; Moser, H. S.; Sheedy, M. D.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel at one or more locations. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. The results contained in this report will be combined with results from previous years in a summary available from University of Arizona Cooperative Extension.
  • Irrigation Practices and Solum Barley Test Weight and Yield, 2001

    Ottman, M. J.; Rogers, M. T.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Solum is a barley bred for reduced water use that tends to have low test weight. This is the second year of an experiment conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to determine the effect of the number of irrigations and their timing on test weight and grain yield of Solum barley. A single irrigation resulted in low yield (2043 lbs/acre) and unacceptable test weight (45.2 lbs/acre). Two or three irrigations increased yield and test weight in most cases. Applying a second irrigation at the 1 node, 2-3 node, or boot stages resulted in yield of 2694, 2877, and 2670 lbs/acre and test weight of 48.5, 49.0, and 49.5 lbs/bu, respectively. Applying a second irrigation at boot and a third irrigation between flowering and soft dough resulted in an average yield of 3008 lbs/acre and an average test weight of 50.0 lbs/bu. Delaying the second irrigation of Solum barley until boot reduces the risk of lodging and low test weight, and results in high yields.
  • Critical Growth Stages for Water Stress in Durum, 2001

    Ottman, M. J.; Husman, S. H.; Wegener, R. J.; Sheedy, M. D.; White, K.; Rogers, M. T.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    The purpose of this research was to determine which durum growth stage is most responsive to additional irrigations (based on 35% depletion) when grown at a slightly suboptimal irrigation level of 65% plant available soil water depletion at other growth stages. A field experiment was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center testing the effects of additional irrigations applied during tillering, jointing, or grain fill. Additional irrigations during tillering, jointing, grain fill, or no additional irrigations resulted in grain yields of 5964, 5419, 6301, and 4200 lbs/acre for Kronos and 5440, 5990, 5030, and 4019 lbs/acre for Westbred 881, respectively. The most responsive stage to additional irrigation was grain fill for Kronos and jointing for Westbred 881. The yield response of Kronos to additional irrigation during jointing may have been reduced by severe (78%) lodging in this treatment.
  • Alfalfa Variety Performance at Maricopa, 1999-2000

    Ottman, M. J.; Smith, S. E.; Fendenheim, D. M.; Rogers, M. T.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
  • New Alfalfa Variety Trial in Graham County Arizona, 2000

    Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Twenty six alfalfa varieties with fall dormancy ratings of 8 or 9 were tested in a replicated small plot trial on a sandy clay loam soil on the Safford Agricultural Center. This was the second year of the study. Coronado was the highest yielding variety in 2000 with Mecca III following closely behind. Both varieties produced a yield over 9 tons per acre and averaged 9.3 tons per acre over the 2-year period.
  • Alfalfa Variety Trial on Heavy Clay Soil in Graham County Arizona, 2000

    Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Twenty four alfalfa varieties with fall dormancy ratings of 8 or 9 were tested in a replicated small plot trial on a heavy clay loam soil on the Safford Agricultural Center. This was the fifth and final year of the study. Prestige was the highest yielding variety in 2000, but that still left it in sixth place behind Cuf 101 and WL 91-224F, which averaged 8.25 tons per acre over the five years of the study. Heat units with thresholds of 77° F and 41° F are included for each cutting in the study and percent of final stand count are recorded.
  • Effects of Various Insecticides on Early Fall Alfalfa Insects and Related Crop Yield and Quality

    Rethwisch, Michael D.; Nelson, John E.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    Six insecticides and/or rates were applied for efficacy data collection for Empoasca sp. leafhoppers and threecornered alfalfa hoppers. Data were also collected on a number of other insects present. Samples were collected one, four, seven and ten days post treatment. Yield and quality data were obtained after baling. Data indicated that several insecticides effectively controlled threecornered alfalfa hopper, as well as provided control of Empoasca leafhoppers. The Baythroid 2 treatment increased yields by 0.3 tons/acre (35%) compared with the check, but yields across the various treatments did not correlate with insect control. Quality from the various treatments was similar. Application of Baythroid 2 at 2 oz/acre increased net return by $7.63/acre due to increased yields. No postiive economic returns were realized from any of the other treatments in this experiment.
  • Insecticide Efficacy Ratings for Empoasca sp. Leafhoppers and Threecornered Alfalfa Hoppers, and Comparative Insecticidal Application Effects on Big-Eyed Bugs

    Ottman, Michael J.; Rethwisch, Michael D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
    This report summarizes data from several studies conducted along the Colorado River in recent years for control of Empoasca sp. leafhoppers, threecornered alfalfa hoppers, and western big-eyed bugs. Data were rearranged and presented in an easy to understand format for insect pests control utilizing a time sequence corresponding to sampling dates after application, a method not always readily available.