• A 1,373 Year Reconstruction of Annual Precipitation for the Southern Rio Grande Basin

      Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Baisan, Christopher H.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Dept. of Physics, Astronomy & Geosciences, Valdosta State University; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1977-11-10)
    • Analysis and Evaluation of the Sources of Variation in Tree-Rings from Mesa Verde National Park (Progress Report)

      Fritts, Harold C.; Smith, David G.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-08-30)
      The study of tree-ring series, called dendrochronology, was originally conceived by A. E. Douglass as a tool for studying sun-spot cycles. He developed a system of cross- dating which provided for the accurate age determination of rings and this made possible the precise dating of archaeological sites. More recently Edmund Schulman used the width measurements of dated tree-rings as estimates of past climatic and stream -flow patterns.Such applications appeared to have greater precision when the tree -ring samples came from so called "sensitive sites" (i.e., drained ridges or slopes). The present study is the first of a series designed to further assess the effect of site and to provide an estimate of the relative magnitude of each of the sources of variation. The study is supported by the National Geographic Society, Wetherill Mesa Project at Mesa Verde National Park.
    • Analysis of Growth Trends and Variation in Conifers from Arizona and New Mexico: Youthful Trees, Competition, and Densitometric Chronologies

      Graybill, Donald A.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Telewski, Frank W.; Park, Wonkyu; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Garden; Department of Forest Products, Chungbuk National University (1990-10-26)
    • Analysis of Growth Trends and Variation in Conifers from Central Arizona: I. Network Chronology Development and Analysis

      Graybill, Donald A.; Rose, Martin R.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (1988)
    • An Approach to Dendroclimatology: Screening by Means of Multiple Regression Techniques

      Fritts, Harold C.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-02)
    • Augmenting Annual Runoff Records Using Tree-Ring Data

      Stockton, Charles W.; Fritts, Harold C.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1971-04)
      INTRODUCTION: Any statistical work involving hydrologic records is handicapped when the records are of relatively short duration, as are most such records in the Southwestern United States. This is because the short records are not necessarily a random sample of the infinite population of events, and consequently any statistical descriptions are likely to be in error to some extent. Work recently completed at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research [Stockton, 1971] has shown that tree ring data can be used to extend available runoff records backward in time, thereby providing a longer record from which to more accurately estimate the three most common statistics used in hydrology, the mean, the variance, and the first order autocorrelation.
    • Circum-Antarctic Paleoclimate from Tree-Ring Analysis: Final Technical Report

      LaMarche, Valmore C., Jr.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1978-01-16)
    • Climate in North-Central China from tree-ring variables

      Hughes, Malcolm K.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (1993)
    • The Climate of Arizona: Prospects for the Future

      Brazel, Anthony J.; Fritts, Harold C.; Idso, Sherwood B.; Department of Geography, Arizona State University; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona (The State Climatologist for Arizona (Tempe, AZ), 1978)
      Introduction: The climate of any region sets the tempo of indigenous life styles and largely dictates the scale and type of economic activity that can be sustained. In Arizona, we are subject to perhaps more climatic restraints than are many other areas, due to the high air temperatures in summer and the rather low yearly rainfall. But, weather is variable; and its sum total -- climate -- is not unchanging either. Thus, in planning the future direction economic activity should take, prospects for changes in climate should be considered. In this paper we attempt to marshal the best evidence available to outline the possibilities for Arizona's future climate. We hope that the information will prove useful to those who must make the difficult decisions that will shape the character of our state in the years to come.
    • Climatic Regimes of the Pacific Sector and Adjacent Continents Since 1600: A Synoptic Description and Comparison of Independent Climate Proxy Records

      Fritts, Harold C.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-06)
    • Climatic Variations for North America and the North Pacific Since A.D. 1500 as Identified by Well-Dated Tree Rings, and Applied Research Reconstructing Past Climate of the Northern Hemisphere by Use of Tree Rings (Progress Reports)

      Fritts, Harold C.; Ares, M. C.; Blasing, T. J.; Carter, J. R.; Conkey, L. E.; DeWitt, E.; Lofgren, G. R.; Robinson, W. J.; Sherwood, J. A.; Stevens, D. W.; Winter, C. L.; Wiseman, M. A.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1977)
    • Comments on TRL 63-48

      Ferguson, C. W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1974-08-20)
    • Concepts and Techniques of Dendrochronology

      Ferguson, C. W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1970)
    • Conditional Probability of Occurrence for Variations in Climate Based on Widths of Annual Tree Rings in Arizona

      Stockton, Charles W.; Fritts, Harold C.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-01-10)
      Modern statistical innovations have been incorporated into several recent analyses of tree -ring growth as related to climate. For example, Fritts (1962) used stepwise multiple regression techniques to study the systematic relationship of ring widths to climatic parameters in the southwestern United States; Bryson and Dutton (1962) have utilized power and cross -power spectral analyses in analyzing tree-ring records for periodicities; Mitchell (1967) applied factorial analysis; and Julian and Fritts (1967) introduced digital filter techniques as a means of appraising the systematic relations of tree growth to climatic variables. None of these studies, however, has attempted to analyze the joint occurrence of specific ring widths with certain climatic types so that probability statements could be made about climate from ring widths. This present study analyzes the joint occurrence of climate and relative width of tree rings for the state of Arizona. Conditional probabilities of occurrence are used to establish quantitative relevance of state -wide tree -ring growth from 1900 through 1957 to recorded climate for 1899 through 1957. The results are then used to make probability estimates of climate for the period 1650 through 1899.
    • Cutoff Lows in the Southwestern United States and Their Effects on the Precipitation of this Region: A Study of Circulation Features that may be Recorded by Tree Rings

      Douglas, Arthur V.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1974-06)
    • Dendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, California

      LaMarche, Valmore C., Jr.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1974-05-20)
      The bristlecone pines are of exceptional interest for studies of past environmental changes and especially of climatic changes. Individual trees of these species attain ages approaching 5000 years, and the wood of dead trees can remain intact for several thousand years more. These characteristics permit the development of very long tree-ring chronologies. Furthermore, ecological and environmental changes are shown by the age structure of the forest and by presence of logs, stumps, and wood remnants in areas that are now unforested. The Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva D. K. Bailey) and the closely related Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.) are widely distributed in the high mountains of western United States. However, the largest number of old trees and the greatest climatic sensitivity of ring -width characteristics and of distributional patterns are found at the western limits of the Great Basin species - in the White Mountains of eastern California.
    • Dendrochronology in Mexico

      Bannister, Bryant; Scott, Stuart D.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964)
    • "Dendrochronology in Northern Mexico" Final Technical Report

      Stokes, Marvin A.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (1978-01)