ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at the University of Arizona publishes several commodity-based agricultural reports, known as "Production Reports". These reports are produced by both the Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension, with the purpose of providing annual research updates to farmers, researchers, and agricultural industry.

Both historical and current Production Reports have been made available via the UA Campus Repository, as part of a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the University Libraries.

The production reports available in the UA Campus Repository include:
Citrus Reports | Cotton Reports | Forage & Grain Reports | Sugarbeet Reports | Turfgrass Reports | Vegetable Reports


QUESTIONS?

Contact CALS Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu, or visit the CALS Publications website.

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Recent Submissions

  • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Arizona City, Maricopa and Yuma, 2013

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1265.pdf.
  • Effect of Planting Date on Wheat Yield in Yuma, 2013

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Planting dates are known to affect wheat yields. Previous research has shown that the optimum planting date in Yuma is December 15 to January 15. Wheat is sometimes sown later than this in the Yuma area, and earlier planting dates have not been tested. To test a wide range of planting dates, six varieties(Duraking, Havasu, Joaquin, Kronos, WB-Mead, and Yecora Rojo) were planted at two seeding rates (160 and 240 lbs/A) and six planting dates at the beginning of each month from November through April at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center. Grain yield averaged 6517 (Nov 4), 6339 (Dec 6), 6096(Jan 4), 5712 (Feb 1), 4962(Mar 1), and 3590(Apr 5). The late-flowering varieties performed relatively better at the earlier planting dates. Seeding rates of 160 and 240 lbs/A had no measureable effect on yield overall.
  • 2012 Sorghum Silage Variety Trial at Maricopa

    Loper, Shawna; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    Nine varieties of silage sorghum and one pearl millet variety were tested at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in Maricopa, AZ. Information on silage sorghum yield and quality can be of use to the dairy industry and help growers choose the best varieties based on their needs. We found no significant differences among the varieties for ash, ADF, and NDF. We did find significant differences in yield with Silo 700 BMR having the highest yield with 31.62 tons/acre and GS125 having the lowest with 20.53 tons/acre. We also saw significant differences in crude protein with ExpGD having the highest (3.47%) and Silo 700 BMR (1.93%) being the lowest.
  • Cultivar and Nitrogen Effects on Yield and Grain Protein in Irrigated Durum Wheat, 2012

    Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Brunson, Kevin; Thorp, Kelly; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Michael J.; School of Plant Sciences / Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona; Arid-Land Ag Research Center, USDA-ARS, Maricopa, AZ (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-05)
    The grain yield and nitrogen use efficiency of durum wheat vary in response to genotypic and nitrogen fertilization were studied in field during two growth seasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects the N fertilizer rate on grain yield and quality under irrigated desert conditions in relation to N utilization. Six durum wheat cultivars (Duraking, Havasu, Kronos, Ocotillo, Orita, Topper) were grown in field trails under irrigated regimes at five N levels (0, 65, 110, 160, 240 lbs/acre) in 2010-2011 and six N levels (0, 65, 110, 160, 240, 360 kg ha-1) in 2011-2012 at Maricopa Ag Center. The results showed the varieties and N levels both significantly affected grain yield, grain protein concentration, and nitrogen use efficiency. A simple and rapid method to measure crop N status using SPAD meters was also developed. The results showed that using the differences in SPAD readings between the first and second fully expanded leaves is a useful way to improve effectiveness of SPAD meters in durum wheat N management.
  • Response of Wheat and Barley Varieties to Phosphorus Fertilizer, 2010

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
    Phosphorus fertilizer represents a significant portion of the cost of producing small grains. Some evidence exists that there are differences in the ability of small grain varieties to take phosphorus up from the soil and utilize this nutrient in the grain. The objective of this study is to determine if barley and wheat varieties grown in Arizona differ in their response to phosphorus fertilizer. A study was conducted for the second year at the Maricopa Agricultural Center testing the response of 7 barley and 14 wheat (12 durum wheat and 2 bread wheat) varieties to 2 phosphorus rates (0 and 100 lbs P₂O₅/acre). The grain yield increase due to phosphorus application averaged across varieties in 2010 was 170 lbs/acre for barley (not statistically significant) and 545 lbs/acre for wheat. The grain yield increase averaged across varieties and years was 331 lbs/acre for barley and 577 lbs/acre for wheat. The barley and wheat varieties did not differ in their grain yield increase due to phosphorus fertilizer in 2010. However, based on 2 years of results, we were able to detect differences among wheat but not barley varieties in their response to P fertilizer. The yield response to P fertilizer (100 lbs P₂O₅/acre) among durum wheat varieties varied from 331 lbs/acre for Alamo to 1063 lbs/acre for Orita. Yecora rojo, a bread wheat, did not respond to P fertilizer.
  • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Maricopa, Coolidge and Yuma, 2010

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
    Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1265.pdf.
  • Invinsa Application to Reduce Water Stress Effects on Corn Growth and Yield at Maricopa, AZ, 2012

    Ottman, M. J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    Invinsa blocks ethylene perception by plants and can reduce the negative effects of water stress on crop growth. The objective of this study is to measure the effect on corn growth and yield of Invinsa application at incipient water stress. A study was conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center where Invinsa was applied on 15 May in blocks with adequate or deficit irrigation. The deficit irrigation block received no irrigation water for 7 days past incipient stress beginning on 15 May, but otherwise received adequate water during the other parts of the season. Invinsa had little or no effect on crop growth measured at five different dates during the growing season. Invinsa had no effect on grain yield, grain moisture content, harvest index, ear number, kernels per ear, kernel weight, and silking date. We were not able to measure an effect of Invinsa on photosynthetic rate, conductance to water, intercellular CO2 concentration, vapor pressure deficit, or leaf temperature. However, Invinsa increased daily water use at various time periods, particularly in the adequate irrigation regime. The lack of a response this year to Invinsa, other than water use, is similar to the results from last year where no consistent response was measured. Invinsa has increased corn yield in other regions, and heat and/or water stress at the Maricopa may mask the effects of Invinsa or render it ineffective.
  • Determination of Optimal Planting Configuration of Low Input and Organic Barley and Wheat Production in Arizona, 2012

    Ottman, M. J.; Andrade-Sanchez, P.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    Markets for organic barley and wheat are expanding. A major problem growing organic barley and wheat is controlling the weeds. Organic barley and wheat were grown in conventional 6-inch drill spacing but also in 30 inch spacing so weeds could be cultivated in a study at the Larry Hart Farm near Maricopa. The weed pressure was moderate and the weed biomass was about 1 to 5% of the crop biomass near maturity. The primary weed was Palmer amaranth. Grain yields of the wheat (durum) were similar regardless of row spacing, but the barley grain yields were 3921 lbs/acre in the 6 inch spacing and 2530 lbs/acre in the 30 inch spacing.
  • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Arizona City, Coolidge, Maricopa and Yuma, 2012

    Ottman, M. J.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1265.pdf.
  • Silage Corn Variety Trial in Central Arizona

    Loper, Shawna; Subramani, Jay; Ottman, Michael J.; University of Arizona of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Pinal County; Maricopa Ag Center, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    Ten varieties of silage corn were tested at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in Central Arizona. Information on silage corn yield and quality can help the dairy industry and silage growers choose varieties that best fit their needs. There were no significant differences between any of the varieties tested with respect to ‘yield per acre’, ‘crude protein’, NDF or ‘ash content'. We were able to find significant differences with ADF.
  • Alfalfa Variety Performance at Tucson, 2009-2010

    Ottman, M. J.; Smith, S. E.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    New alfalfa varieties are constantly being introduced into the marketplace. The number of varieties available for low-elevation desert areas in Arizona in the non-dormant class is over50. New varieties are introduced each year and unbiased yield comparisons are helpful to the grower to base the decision of whether or not to sow a new variety. The study reported here is part of the on-going effort to evaluate alfalfa variety performance in Arizona. A summary of alfalfa variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1267.pdf.
  • Alfalfa Variety Performance at Tucson, 2007-2008

    Ottman, M. J.; Smith, S. E.; Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-06)
    New alfalfa varieties are constantly being introduced into the marketplace. The number of varieties available for low-elevation desert areas in Arizona in the non-dormant class is aver50. New varieties are introduced each year and unbiased yield comparisons are helpful to the grower to base the decision of whether or not to sow a new variety. The study reported here is part of the ongoing effort to evaluate alfalfa variety performance in Arizona. A summary of alfalfa variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1267.pdf.
  • Wheat and Barley Variety and Date of Planting Yield Comparisons at the Safford Agricultural Center 1985

    Thompson, R. K.; Bobula, J. L.; Clark, L. J.; Voigt, Robert; Ottman, Michael; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985-09)
  • Canarygrass Control in Alfalfa, Yuma Valley Experiment Station

    Tickes, Barry; Heathman, Stanley; Voigt, Robert; Ottman, Michael; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985-09)
  • Late-Season Pink Bollworm Control

    Watson, T. F.; Fullerton, D. G. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1970-02)
  • Skip-Row Cotton Favors Acala Varieties

    Blackledge, G. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-02)
  • A Summary on Skip-Row Planted Cotton in Arizona

    Briggs, R. E.; Massey, G. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-02)
  • Introduction (Sugarbeets: A College of Agriculture Report, 1983)

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1983-01)
  • Introduction (Sugarbeets: A College of Agriculture Report, 1982)

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982-01)
  • Introduction (Sugarbeets: A College of Agriculture Report, 1981)

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1981-01)

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