• 1961 Arizona Insect Control Recommendations

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-03)
    • Agricultural Fumigation Safety Guide for the Arizona Pesticide Applicator Certification

      Baker, Paul B.; Carlo, Luis; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-12)
    • Alfalfa Aphid Complex

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      The alfalfa aphid discussed in this publication includes blue alfalfa aphid, pea aphid, and the spotted alfalfa aphid. This publication discusses the biology of these alfalfa aphids, the damages they cause, the resistant varieties and biological control, and their monitoring and treatments.
    • Alfalfa Caterpillar/Butterfly

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      The first sign of a potential alfalfa caterpillar (Colias eurytheme) outbreak is the influx of large numbers of yellow or white butterflies in late spring or early summer. This publication discusses the biology of the alfalfa caterpillar, the damage it causes, the biological and cultural controls, and the treatments for it.
    • Alfalfa Weed Control in the Low Deserts of Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Tickes, Barry; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-04)
      The most effective weed control practice in alfalfa is maintaining a healthy crop and dense stand. Cultural practices that promote a vigorous stand can reduce the need for chemical weed control. Cultural practices that promote a healthy stand reduce the need for chemical weed control, but herbicides are sometimes necessary even in well-managed alfalfa.
    • Aphids

      Warren, Peter L.; Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      A description of aphids, the damage they cause, their lifecycle, and management recommendations.
    • Area-Wide Spraying for Asian Citrus Psyllid in Texas and Florida

      Wright, Glenn C.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      Realizing that the Arizona citrus industry might someday have to deal with widespread ACP control, the Arizona Citrus Research Council approved a trip to Florida and Texas to investigate how ACP control was accomplished in those two states. The trips were to McAllen, Texas on 9-12 Nov 2011 and to Immokalee Florida on 17-18 Nov. 2011. In McAllen, I interviewed Dr. Mamoudou Setamou, extension entomologist for Texas A&M – Kingsville and his staff, and Mr. Ray Prewitt, president of Texas Citrus Mutual. In Florida, I interviewed Mr. Ron Hamel, manager of the Gulf Citrus Growers, and Dr. Mongi Zekri, southwest Florida Multi-County Citrus Agent, housed at the Hendry County Extension Office in LaBelle., FL. The author hopes that some of this information can be used in the development of an Area Wide Spray Plan in Arizona.
    • Arizona Cotton Insects: Descriptions and Habits

      Telford, Allan D.; Wene, George P.; Carruth, Laurence A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-06)
    • Arizona Cotton Insects: Descriptions and Habits

      Wene, George P.; Carruth, Laurence A.; Telford, Allan D.; Hopkins, Lemac (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Arizona Golf Course Pesticide Use Survey

      Merrigan, Sheila D.; Baker, Paul; Kopec, David; Clark, Mark (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-05)
    • Arizona Insect Control Recommendations

      Roney, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-07)
    • Arizona Insect Control Recommendations, 1953

      Roney, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-02)
    • Arizona Insect Control Recommendations, 1954

      Roney, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1954-02)
    • Arizona Insect Control Recommendations, 1955

      Roney, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1955-03)
    • Arizona Termites of Economic Importance

      Baker, Paul B.; Marchosky, Ruben; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-06)
    • Bagrada Bug: A New Pest for Arizona Gardeners

      Bealmear, Stacey; Warren, Peter; Young, Kelly (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-12)
    • Bat Problem Management

      Sullivan, Lawrence; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      Withdrawn 7/09
    • Bats

      Gouge, Dawn; Li, Shujuan; Nair, Shaku (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-07)
      This document provides a general overview of bat biology and behavior with emphasis on urban environments, use of integrated pest management (IPM) techniques that are in keeping with bat conservation guidelines, and disease awareness and prevention efforts.
    • Batty About Bats

      Gouge, Dawn; Lawaczeck, E.; Snyder, J.; Renison, Nancy; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-11)
      Bats, order Chiroptera, have traditionally been maligned and misunderstood by the general public. Bats are, however, important components of the natural and urban landscape; they provide valuable pest control of public health and nuisance insects, and they serve an important role in the pollination of several of Arizona's native columnar cacti. In urban environments, particularly schools, bats are of concern due to their ability to vector the rabies virus. Consequently, the status of bats of bats in schools has become that of a pest. Integrated pest management (IPM) methods have traditionally been reserved for managing arthropods; however, the fundamental principles of urban IPM may be just as easily applied to mammals with equal success. The ecologically sensitive aspects of IPM make this a highly preferred approach in managing bats as an organism of considerable conservation concern.
    • Beet Armyworm

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      Beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) caterpillars cause various damages to plants. This article describes the biology of the beet armyworm, discusses the damages they cause, and recommends the biological and cultural controls and treatments.