ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Arizona Cooperative Extension is an outreach arm of The University of Arizona and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS). The repository collection includes current and historical Extension publications on these topics: Animal Systems; Consumer Education; Farm Management and Safety; Food Safety; Nutrition and Health; Gardening/Home Horticulture; Insects and Pest Management; Marketing and Retailing; Natural Resources and Environment; Plant Diseases; Plant Production/Crops, Water, and Youth and Family. Current publications are also available from the CALS Publications and Videos website.


QUESTIONS?

Contact College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.

Recent Submissions

  • Human Disease Causing Viruses Vectored by Mosquitoes

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Hagler, James R.; Nair, Shaku; Walker, Kathleen; Li, Shujuan; Bibbs, Christopher S.; Sumner, Chris; Smith, Kirk A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
    There are a number of disease-causing viruses transmitted to people primarily through the bite of infected mosquitoes. Female mosquitoes take blood meals to produce eggs. A mosquito that bites an infected animal may pick up a virus within the blood meal. If the mosquito is the appropriate species, and conditions inside the insect and the surrounding environment are supportive, the virus reproduces within the mosquito. Later, the mosquito may pass the virus on to other animals (including humans) as they feed again.
  • Better Coverage of Arizona's Weather and Climate: Gridded Datasets of Daily Surface Meteorological Variables

    Weiss, Jeremy; Crimmins, Michael; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-08)
    Many areas that use agricultural and environmental science for management and planning – ecosystem conservation, crop and livestock systems, water resources, forestry and wildland fire management, urban horticulture – often need historical records of daily weather for activities that range from modeling forage production to determining the frequency of freezing temperatures or heavy rainfall. In the past, such applications primarily have used station-based observations of meteorological variables like temperature and precipitation. However, weather stations are sparsely and irregularly located throughout Arizona, and due to the highly variable terrain across the state (Figure 1), information recorded at these sites may not represent meteorological conditions at distant, non-instrumented locations or over broad areas. This issue, along with others related to quality, length, and completeness of station records, can hinder the use of weather and climate data for agricultural and natural resources applications. In response to an increasing demand for spatially and temporally complete meteorological data as well as the potential constraints of station-based records, the number of gridded daily surface weather datasets is expanding. This bulletin reviews a current suite of these datasets, particularly those that integrate both atmospheric and topographic information in order to better model temperature and precipitation on relatively fine spatial scales, and is intended for readers with knowledge of weather, climate, and geospatial data. In addition to addressing how these datasets are developed and what their spatial domain and resolution, record length, and variables are, this bulletin also summarizes where and how to access these datasets, as well as the general suitability of these datasets for different uses.
  • Mosquitoes: Biology and Integrated Mosquito Management

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Li, Shujuan; Walker, Kathleen; Sumner, Chris; Nair, Shaku; Olson, Carl; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-07)
    Mosquitoes are the most important insect pests that affect the health and well-being of humans and domestic animals worldwide. They can cause a variety of health problems due to their ability to transfer (vector) viruses and other disease-causing pathogens, including in the arid Southwest U.S. This publication describes the mosquito life-cycle, introduces common pest mosquito species and the diseases associated with them. Mosquito management for residents is covered.
  • Pine Engraver Beetles in the Low Elevation Sonoran Desert in Tucson

    Warren, Peter, L.; Quist, Tanya, M.; Schuch, Ursula, K.; Erickson, Chris; Celaya, Bob; Richardson, John (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-12)
    Pine engraver beetle refers to 11 species of insects (in the Ips genus) living in the inner bark of Arizona’s conifers that can cause rapid decline and tree death. Typically, the beetles are found at higher elevations (4200 feet to 9000 feet), but have recently been detected at about 2400 feet, in Tucson. The six-spined engraver (Ips calligraphus ponderosae) has been the only species detected, so far, in Tucson. This is the first time these native bark beetles have been found in non-native pines in the Sonoran Desert.
  • Sonic Pest Repellents

    Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
    Sonic pest devices are tools that emit sound in the attempt to repel, deter, or kill unwanted animals such as insects, rodents, birds and large mammals. There are many commercially available sonic pest devices that claim to be effective.Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available.
  • Biology and Management of Downy Mildew of Lettuce

    Matheron, Michael E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
    This publication describes the factors affecting development of downy mildew of lettuce and provides disease management strategies.
  • Pest-proofing Your Home

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan; Stock, Tim (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
    Many pests encountered in homes and structures can be prevented by using simple techniques collectively known as “pest-proofing”. If done correctly, pest-proofing your home saves you money by reducing pest management costs, and more importantly, reduces potential pesticide exposure. This publication describes general indoor and outdoor pest-proofing measures and some of the major pests encountered in and around homes and structures.
  • Bats

    Gouge, Dawn; Li, Shujuan; Nair, Shaku (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-07)
    This document provides a general overview of bat biology and behavior with emphasis on urban environments, use of integrated pest management (IPM) techniques that are in keeping with bat conservation guidelines, and disease awareness and prevention efforts.
  • Preparing Your School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Stock, Tim; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan (Lucy); Bryks, Sam; Hurley, Janet; Fournier, Al (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
    This document is intended to help you develop an implementable IPM Plan for your school or school district. We have provided a modifiable template which can be downloaded at: http://cals.arizona.edu/apmc/westernschoolIPM.html#pubs.
  • Area-Wide Spraying for Asian Citrus Psyllid in Texas and Florida

    Wright, Glenn C.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
    Realizing that the Arizona citrus industry might someday have to deal with widespread ACP control, the Arizona Citrus Research Council approved a trip to Florida and Texas to investigate how ACP control was accomplished in those two states. The trips were to McAllen, Texas on 9-12 Nov 2011 and to Immokalee Florida on 17-18 Nov. 2011. In McAllen, I interviewed Dr. Mamoudou Setamou, extension entomologist for Texas A&M – Kingsville and his staff, and Mr. Ray Prewitt, president of Texas Citrus Mutual. In Florida, I interviewed Mr. Ron Hamel, manager of the Gulf Citrus Growers, and Dr. Mongi Zekri, southwest Florida Multi-County Citrus Agent, housed at the Hendry County Extension Office in LaBelle., FL. The author hopes that some of this information can be used in the development of an Area Wide Spray Plan in Arizona.
  • Practical Methods of Controlling Bed Bugs at Home

    Li, Shujuan; Gouge, Dawn; Fournier, Al (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-09)
    Bed bugs can cause anxiety, bite reactions, and financial hardship. The University of Arizona Community IPM Program and partnering research institutions are working to battle the recent bed bug resurgence. Researchers hope to determine the real social cost of bed bugs, as well as the significant causes of infestations. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach is the most likely strategy to result in successful elimination of bed bugs.
  • Sonic Pest Repellents

    Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
    Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available. As our understanding increases of how pest species receive and process sound, more relevant sonic devices may be developed. The allure of sound as a treatment for pests will remain into the future—motivated by the fact that if they are successful they will be more environmentally friendly and safer for humans.
  • Phenology: Using Phenology as a Tool for Education, Research, and Understanding Environmental Change

    Warren, Peter L.; Barnett, LoriAnne (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-06)
    Phenology is defined and described in terms of how we use observations in education and research. Suggestions for implementing phenology lessons using examples from 4-H youth development and Master Gardener and citizen science training.
  • Aphids

    Warren, Peter L.; Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
    A description of aphids, the damage they cause, their lifecycle, and management recommendations.
  • Arizona Cotton Insects: Descriptions and Habits

    Telford, Allan D.; Wene, George P.; Carruth, Laurence A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-06)
  • Protect the Cotton Plant From Insect Injury

    Roney, J. N.; Moore, Leon; Wene, George (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-03)
  • 1961 Arizona Insect Control Recommendations

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-03)
  • Controls for Vegetable Insects for Commercial Producers

    Roney, J. N.; Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-11)
  • Control Insects of Flowers, Shrubs, and Shade Trees

    Roney, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-10)
  • Kill Livestock Pests

    Roney, J. N.; Lane, Al (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-03)

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