ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Arizona Cooperative Extension is an outreach arm of The University of Arizona and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS). The repository collection includes current and historical Extension publications on these topics: Animal Systems; Consumer Education; Farm Management and Safety; Food Safety; Nutrition and Health; Gardening/Home Horticulture; Insects and Pest Management; Marketing and Retailing; Natural Resources and Environment; Plant Diseases; Plant Production/Crops, Water, and Youth and Family. Current publications are also available from the CALS Publications and Videos website.


QUESTIONS?

Contact College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.

Recent Submissions

  • Types of Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Franklin, Ed; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
    Solar energy systems can help Arizona individuals, families, and businesses achieve energy conservation goals beyond the adoption of energy-efficient appliances, and LED bulbs. Which type of system is the best? Knowing which system to select is the first important question. This factsheet will focus on solar photovoltaic energy systems. The term photovoltaic refers to the conversion of light energy to electricity.
  • Know Your Zoning

    Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
    Zoning is the mechanism by which government protects public health, safety and welfare in addition to minimizing impacts to neighboring properties. This fact sheet informs the reader on where to go to find out about the zoning of their rural property in Arizona and what limitations and opportunities their zoning calls for. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 1/2011
  • Home-siting for New Rural Residents

    Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
    Choosing the right spot to build a home in Arizona on a vacant piece of property is just as important as choosing the property itself. This fact sheet describes the factors that should be considered before beginning construction on any given piece of property. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 1/2011
  • Laboratories Conducting Soil, Plant, Feed, or Water Testing

    Schalau, Jeff W.; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-09)
    This publication lists laboratories that provide soil, plant, feed, and water testing within the state of Arizona. Revised September 2016.
  • Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Site Assessment

    Franklin, Ed; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
    An important consideration when installing a solar photovoltaic (PV) array for residential, commercial, or agricultural operations is determining the suitability of the site. A roof-top location for a residential application may have fewer options due to limited space (roof size), type of roofing material (such as a sloped shingle, or a flat roof), the orientation (south, east, or west), and roof-mounted structures such as vent pipe, chimney, heating & cooling units. A location with open space may utilize a ground-mount system or pole-mount system.
  • Demystifying The Solar Module

    Franklin, Ed; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
    The adoption of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems to serve as an energy source for residential, commercial and agriculture applications is growing. Early use of solar PV energy as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels became popular in the 1970’s during the rise of the environmental movement. The cost of solar power in 1977 was $76.00 per watt. A combination of factors including public awareness, demand for solar, availability of product and service, and improving technology has dropped the cost per solar watt. In 2015, the cost of solar power was $0.613 per watt (Shahan, 2014). Energy rebates offered by local, state, and federal agencies has made the adoption of solar energy more affordable.
  • What You Need to Know Before You Buy Your “Ranchette”— Lot-Splits Versus Subdivisions in Rural Arizona

    Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
    Arizona's rural areas are dotted with small acreage properties that are too big to mow and too small to farm. This fact sheet describes the legal processes that create these kinds of properties and inform the reader on the difference between lot-split properties and those that undergo a legal subdivision process with a local county government. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 2/2011.
  • Pest-proofing Your Home

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan; Stock, Tim (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
    Many pests encountered in homes and structures can be prevented by using simple techniques collectively known as “pest-proofing”. If done correctly, pest-proofing your home saves you money by reducing pest management costs, and more importantly, reduces potential pesticide exposure. This publication describes general indoor and outdoor pest-proofing measures and some of the major pests encountered in and around homes and structures.
  • Food Product Dating and Storage Times

    Armstrong Florian, Traci L.; Misner, Scottie (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
    Nutritious food is an important part of individual health and wellness. One way to ensure food is nutritious is to check the date on packages. The date is a guideline to help consumers use food when it is at its peak quality or before spoilage begins. Proper storage conditions and times are also essential in keeping healthy food safe to consume.
  • Preparing Your School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Stock, Tim; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan (Lucy); Bryks, Sam; Hurley, Janet; Fournier, Al (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
    This document is intended to help you develop an implementable IPM Plan for your school or school district. We have provided a modifiable template which can be downloaded at: http://cals.arizona.edu/apmc/westernschoolIPM.html#pubs.
  • Local Foods in Arizona

    Hongu, Nobuko; Turner, Rachel J.; Gallaway, Patrick J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Gonsalves, Kimberly A.; Martinez, Cathy L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
    More and more consumers are choosing to buy locally produced foods. Locally grown foods are, fresher, contain more nutrients if picked at full ripeness, and are considered by many consumers to be better tasting than foods that have endured many miles of transportation. Consuming local produce may help communities by stimulating local economies and protecting the environment. This article outlines the benefits of buying locally grown foods. A recipe that is easy and affordable using some local produce is included. A calendar of seasonal produce in Arizona is included in the Appendix.
  • Working with Non-Profit Organizations – Cooperative Extension’s Opportunity to Expand Its Reach

    Apel, Mark B.; Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
    This article describes the advantages and benefits of collaborations between Cooperative Extension and non-profit organizations in terms of increasing Extension's outreach capacity and assisting non-profits. Guidelines are provided for Extension personnel interested in working with non-profits.
  • Buying Locally Grown and Eating Seasonally in Arizona

    Hongu, Nobuko; Turner, Rachel J.; Martinez, Cathy L.; Suzuki, Asuka; Gonsalves, Kimberly A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
    More and more consumers are choosing to buy locally produced foods. Health and environment conscious consumers believe locally grown foods are healthier, fresher, and are better tasting than foods that have endured many miles of transport. Buying locally also helps communities by stimulating local economies and protecting the environment. This article outlines the benefits of buying locally grown food and eating seasonally in Arizona. A recipe that is easy and affordable using local produce is included. An Arizona seasonal produce availability calendar is included in the Appendix.
  • Whole Grains on Your Plate

    Hongu, Nobuko; Farr, Kiah J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Grijalva, Valeria (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
    Studies have shown the integration of whole grains into daily diet correlates with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and cancer. This article outlines the daily dietary nutritional benefits of whole grains, as well as the positive long-term health effects associated with consistent whole grain intake in diet. Also, this article provides how to find, prepare, and utilize whole grains in everyday dietary choices. Whole grain alternative cooking recipes are introduced using relatively new whole grains (quinoa, whole wheat couscous) in typical American diets.
  • Sonic Pest Repellents

    Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
    Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available. As our understanding increases of how pest species receive and process sound, more relevant sonic devices may be developed. The allure of sound as a treatment for pests will remain into the future—motivated by the fact that if they are successful they will be more environmentally friendly and safer for humans.
  • Healthy Fats: Tips for Improving the Quality of Fat Intake

    Hongu, Nobuko; Wise, Jamie M.; Gallaway, Patrick J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
    The article provides information about different types of dietary fats and promotes consumption of healthy fats in moderation as part of a balanced diet. The prevalence of fat-free products in grocery stores may give some health-conscious consumers the perception that all dietary fats are unhealthy. However, fats are absolutely vital for proper physiological functioning, and it is imperative that fats are included in a healthy diet. Fats are classified as saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated. Both types of unsaturated fats, when consumed in moderation, can help lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of heart disease, especially when they replace saturated and trans fats. We provide tips for selecting healthier fats, along with a guide for consuming appropriate portions of fat.
  • Arizona Agriculture 1963

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-02)
  • Arizona Agriculture 1964

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-01)
  • Arizona Agriculture 1962

    Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-02)
  • You Can Make This Sewing Cabinet

    Church, Helen L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1955-04)

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