ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics is a publication of the Linguistics Circle, the Graduate Student Organization of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Arizona.


Mailing Address:
University of Arizona Linguistics Circle
ATTN: Coyote Papers
200E Douglass Building
Tucson, AZ 85721
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Contact Coyote Papers at coyotepapers@gmail.com.

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Sequential Grounding and Consonant-Vowel Interaction

    Miyashita, Mizuki; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Anchoring and Reduplicative Identity: Cases from Nancowry and Koasati

    Meek, Barbra; Hendricks, Sean; The University of Arizona; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Augmentation and Correspondence: A Reanalysis of Nancowry Reduplication

    Meek, B. A.; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Trisyllabic Shortening and Two Affix Classes

    Maye, Jessica; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • There is no lexicon!

    Hammond, Michael; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Fronting and Palatalization in Two Dialects of Shoshoni

    Elzinga, Dirk; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Sound Symbolism as a Purposive Function of Culturally Situated Speech: A look at the use of ideophones in Tsonga

    Cole, Deborah L.; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Featural Morphology: Evidence from Muna Irrealis Affixation

    Carter, Allyson; The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Coyote Papers: Volume 10 (2000)

    Unknown author (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
  • Evidence from Modern Greek for Refinement of the OCP

    Meador, Diane; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • "PRO Analysis" for Subject-Oriented Secondary Predicates

    Ikawa, Hisako; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • Deriving Ternarity

    Hammond, Michael; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
    Introduction: Ternary stress patterns have posed a problem for a parametric metrical theory for some time. In this paper, it is argued that ternary systems can be derived in an explanatory fashion from binary systems. The basic idea is that ternary stress systems can be analyzed as binary stress systems if the theory of extrametricality is enriched. Two specific proposals regarding extrametricality are made. First, extrametricality must be tolerated not just at the edge of morphological and syntactic constituents, but also at the edge of phonological constituents. Second, extrametricality can be lost if adjacent feet are subminimal. The organization of this paper is as follows. First, the foot typology is briefly reviewed. Then the theory of extrametricality is presented. It is argued that regardless of the analysis of ternary systems, the theory of extrametricality must be enriched as outlined above. Four metrical systems are then considered: Cayuvava, Chugach, Winnebago, and Estonian. Each of these systems provides arguments for deriving ternarity as proposed here.
  • Arapaho Accent

    Fountain, Amy; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
    Introduction: Arapaho is an Algonquian language spoken by a population of about 3500 in Wyoming and Oklahoma (Salzmann 1983). The accent system of Arapaho is quite complex and presents a challenge to any theory of stress/accent which attempts to account for these phenomena in a derivational manner (Salzmann 1965, Tsay 1989). In this essay it is argued that Arapaho accent involves both lexical and derivational aspects. In section 2, the phonetic characteristics of Arapaho accent are outlined. Section 3 briefly overviews Idsardi's (1992) theory of the computation of stress. In section 4, the Arapaho data are presented and the crucial generalizations are stated. Section 5 contains an analysis of these facts, utilizing Idcardi's theory. An alternative analysis is offered in section 6, and finally in section 7 the theoretical implications of the Arapaho facts are discussed.
  • The Meter of Tohono O'odham Songs

    Fitzgerald, Colleen M.; Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • Coyote Papers: Volume 9 (1995)

    Unknown author (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1995)
  • Ju:ki/Rain

    Zepeda, Ofelia (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 1983)
  • Can Idioms Be Passivized?: Evidence from Online Processing

    Stone, Megan Schildmier; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2013)
    This paper presents the results of an experiment designed to access native speakers’ underlying grammatical knowledge concerning the passivizability of English Verb-Object (VO) idioms. Although it has long been noted that some VO idioms retain their idiomatic meaning in the passive while others do not (Katz & Postal 1964, et seq.), the source of this variation is unclear, and native speaker intuitions on a large number of idioms are not as clear cut as previous accounts might suggest. Taking as a starting point Folli and Harley’s (2007) hypothesis that there is a structural distinction between passivizable and nonpassivizable idioms, the current study tests one prediction of this hypothesis, namely that there should be a categorical distinction between the two types of idioms in the grammars of native speakers. The experimental results contradict this hypothesis, as evidenced by a normal distribution of response times to passive idioms. However, it is hypothesized that this online task is not appropriate to access the fine-tuned syntactico-semantic judgments underlying native speaker intuitions of idiom passivizability, due to the fact that the methodology employed here—a self-paced reading task—does not yield the expected results even for canonically passivizable and nonpassivizable idioms.
  • On Semantic Agreement with Quantified Subjects in Russian

    Glushan, Zhanna A.; University of Connecticut (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2013-03-04)
    Quantified numeral subjects in Russian may famously trigger plural or singular verb agreement. Generative accounts (Pesetsky (1982), Franks (1995), Bošković (2006)) tie the variation to Case and the DP/QP distinction. Corpus-based accounts (Revzin (1978), Corbett (2000), Robblee (1993)), in addition to precedence and definiteness/specificity, note a strong correlation between agreement choice and the animacy of a QNP subject. In this paper, I attempt to reconcile the original generalizations in both linguistic traditions by proposing an account whereby (i) the animacy condition on agreement is an argument structure effect (ii) the connection between Nom case and agreement with QNP subjects is captured by Case as accessibility condition for agreement (Marantz (1991), Bobaljik (2008), Baker (2010) Baker and Vinokurova (2011) but contra Chomsky (2000), (2001)) (iii) definiteness/specificity effects with agreement follow from Diesing’s (1992) Mapping Hypothesis and a locality condition on semantic agreement.
  • Situational Demonstratives in Blackfoot

    Schupbach, S. Scott (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2013)
    Previous analyses of Blackfoot’s demonstrative system by Uhlenbeck (1938), Taylor (1969), and Frantz (1971, 2009) share the same tendency to conflate the meanings of different functions of demonstratives into one overly broad meaning. I address this problem by analyzing only the situational uses of demonstratives in 25 stories from Uhlenbeck (1912) and additional data from Uhlenbeck (1938). My solution is built upon the framework outlined in Imai’s (2003) cross-linguistic study of spatial deixis and informed by the typological demonstrative studies of Dixon (2003) and Diessel (1999). I argue that Blackfoot’s demonstrative system encodes features of Imai’s four parameters: anchor, spatial demarcation, referent/region configuration and function.
  • Preposition Stranding in Heritage Speakers of Spanish

    Depiante, Marcela; Thompson, Ellen; University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Florida International University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2013)
    In this research, we explore the linguistic structure of the Spanish of Heritage Speakers, those who have acquired Spanish as the home language in a minority language context (Iverson, 2010). We contribute to the discussion of the properties of Heritage Languages here by examining Preposition Stranding in Heritage Speakers versus native monolingual speakers of Spanish. We claim that the distinct behavior of Heritage Speakers of Spanish supports the claim that Heritage Languages may differ from native monolingual language in the narrow syntax, affecting uninterpretable features of the grammar.

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