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  • The relationships among depression, physical health impairment, and social support in elderly men and women

    Howard, Sara Christine (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between elderly men and women for depression, physical health impairment, and social support and to examine the relationships among depression, physical health impairment, and social support. Data from a secondary analysis was used. A descriptive design was used with a sample consisting of eighty community dwelling older adults (25 men and 55 women). Questionnaires were given regarding depression, physical health impairment, and social support. Tangible aid and emotional aid were the two dimensions of social support measured. There were no significant differences found between men and women for depression, physical health impairment, or social support. Men showed a positive correlation between economic resource impairment and social resource impairment as well as social resource impairment and depression. Women showed a positive correlation between social resource impairment and physical health impairment, depression and physical health impairment, depression and economic resource impairment, and depression and social resource impairment. The findings in this study have important significance to nursing and further research.
  • Prevalence of depression in Mexican American women

    Loyola, Gladys (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    The purpose of this study was to ( 1) find the prevalence of depression in Mexican American women in Pima County and (2) to determine the relationship and significance between depression and biological and psychosocial variables. The biological variables measures included female gender, age, and reproductive phase (premenopause, perimenopause, postmenopause ). The psychosocial variables were marital status, place of birth, living arrangements, income level, educational attainment, employment status, and language preference. A descriptive cross sectional design was utilized to answer the research questions. The convenience sample consisted of 63 female subjects. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) statistical program was used to analyze data. A priori, the cut off rate for the depressed group was set at~ 16 points on the Center for Epidemiologic Scale (CESD) as determined by the instrument developers and previous researchers. The rate of depression found in the evaluated Mexican American population was 62.9%, which is extremely high compared to previous studies. Significant relationships were found between depression, educational attainment, income, being married, and being employed. The findings from this study suggest that the prevalence of depression in Mexican American women could be higher than was previously suggested.
  • Health as perceived by gang members

    Beren, Dorice Dreany (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    The purpose of this study was to explore the health perceptions of gang members. Participant observation and ethnographic interviews were used to determine these perceptions. The interviews were conducted in a charter school in Tucson, Arizona. Three gang members and one nongang member participated in these interviews. Six domains resulted from this study. These doma.ins were: Exercise Practices Associated with Health, Eating Habits Associated with Health, Substance Abuse, Perceptions of a Future, Behaviors Associated with Safety and SelfProtection, and Social Support Systems. Four cultural themes were also identified from this study. The cultural themes are: Health is not important to gang members, gang members have a structure of time that is very now focused, gang members have a strong sense of hopelessness and choicelessness, and finally, lack of social support turns youth towards gang membership and, thus, a higher risk for poor health. Recommendations for health care providers are presented. Suggestions for future studies are also given.
  • Outcomes of an enhanced cross-continuum program of care

    Warmbrodt, Sarah Margaret (The University of Arizona., 1998)
    A comparative descriptive design was used to describe two outcomes, the patients' postoperative mobility and satisfaction with care-related services of a new Enhanced Cross-Continuum Care Program (ECCP) of Care for the total hip joint replacement patient from preadmission screening through discharge from home health, including a preoperative visit that was conducted by a home health registered nurse, physical therapist and an orthopedic nurse case manager in the home. Sixteen subjects having a total hip joint replacement were assigned to either the ECCP group (n = 9) or the Standard Care Program (SCP) (n = 7). Insurance plans dictated the group to which the patients were assigned. Patients having Medicare Part A as their primary insurance were able to participate in the ECCP. Self-report questionnaires and a satisfaction telephone survey were used to obtain outcome data. There was no significant difference between the two groups on mobility or satisfaction.
  • Perceived educational priorities of rural pregnant adolescents and teen mothers

    Henry, Dawn Ann (The University of Arizona., 2001)
    The purpose of this study was to identify perceived educational priorities of pregnant adolescents and teen mothers in a rural area in Southwest Arizona. The data for this descriptive comparative study was gathered with structured interviews and survey questionnaires. The data were utilized to compare perceived educational priorities of pregnant adolescents and adolescent mothers. A sample of5 pregnant adolescent's (14- 17 years) and 5 adolescent mothers ( 15-17 years) were recruited from a teenage pregnancy and parenting program in a small rural community, at least 10-20 miles from a healthcare facility, with no public transportation availability. The results identified many similarities of perceived educational priorities between rural pregnant adolescents and teen mothers, however there was a significant difference in relation to maternal role function. The pregnant adolescents requested more information on infant care and when to call the baby's doctor than teen mothers. Pregnant adolescents also requested more information or felt it was more important then the teen mothers across all categories except physical changes of the body after birth. Both groups felt self-concept and family support were of highest importance. Participants from a teenage pregnant and parenting program in this study provided educational priorities of a rural area. These results provide a step toward obtaining information that would benefit an educational program for rural teens in the Southwest.

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