Mindfulness and Anxiety as Predictors of Swimming Performance Under Pressure

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626167
Title:
Mindfulness and Anxiety as Predictors of Swimming Performance Under Pressure
Author:
Hojnacki, Zachary Steven
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Choking under pressure is a devastating experience for athletes who have invested their time and energy to master a sport. This study reviewed the mechanisms of choking under pressure to further understand the phenomenon and identify possible remedies. Twenty-eight competitive swimmers from the University of Arizona swim team were assessed on measures of dispositional mindfulness and trait anxiety, while three current staff members rated each athlete on measures of skill transfer and receptiveness to feedback. Athlete performances were recorded over the course of one season, and assigned a pressure rating of low, medium, and high. Results indicated significant effects of pressure on change in performance, and revealed non-significant trends between trait anxiety, mindfulness, and performance improvements as a function of pressure. Significant relationships were also found for trait anxiety with mindfulness and gender. Coach ratings were not found to be accurate predictors of improvements in swimming performance. These findings call into question theory suggesting trait anxiety is facilitative when low and detrimental when high, instead suggesting it may distribute as an inverse-u relative to performance. They also suggest dispositional mindfulness may be facilitative of performance under pressure, an endorsement for continued research into the efficacy of mindfulness training in athletics. Finally, they call into question the accuracy of coach ratings of athletes, and reveal a need for further investigation in that area. Implications for choking under pressure are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Anxiety; Coach; Mindfulness; Pressure; Sport; Swimming
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMindfulness and Anxiety as Predictors of Swimming Performance Under Pressureen_US
dc.creatorHojnacki, Zachary Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorHojnacki, Zachary Stevenen
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractChoking under pressure is a devastating experience for athletes who have invested their time and energy to master a sport. This study reviewed the mechanisms of choking under pressure to further understand the phenomenon and identify possible remedies. Twenty-eight competitive swimmers from the University of Arizona swim team were assessed on measures of dispositional mindfulness and trait anxiety, while three current staff members rated each athlete on measures of skill transfer and receptiveness to feedback. Athlete performances were recorded over the course of one season, and assigned a pressure rating of low, medium, and high. Results indicated significant effects of pressure on change in performance, and revealed non-significant trends between trait anxiety, mindfulness, and performance improvements as a function of pressure. Significant relationships were also found for trait anxiety with mindfulness and gender. Coach ratings were not found to be accurate predictors of improvements in swimming performance. These findings call into question theory suggesting trait anxiety is facilitative when low and detrimental when high, instead suggesting it may distribute as an inverse-u relative to performance. They also suggest dispositional mindfulness may be facilitative of performance under pressure, an endorsement for continued research into the efficacy of mindfulness training in athletics. Finally, they call into question the accuracy of coach ratings of athletes, and reveal a need for further investigation in that area. Implications for choking under pressure are discussed.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectCoachen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectPressureen
dc.subjectSporten
dc.subjectSwimmingen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCaslin, Maryen
dc.contributor.committeememberGood, Thomasen
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidien
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