Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626157
Title:
Antidepressant Medication Adherence in Active Duty Army Soldiers
Author:
Gallagher, Shawn Patrick
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Depression can be painful, disabling, and result in fatal consequences. The most common treatment, antidepressant medication, can effectively treat depressive symptoms. Though, adhering to antidepressant medication treatment is a complex phenomenon that can elude even the most informed who suffers from depression. While much is known about antidepressant medication adherence in the general population, there is a dearth of knowledge about it in active duty United States Army soldiers with depression. The purpose of this research was to explore antidepressant adherence among United States Army soldiers with depression in relation to the potential correlates of illness perceptions, beliefs about medication, social support, and selected demographic variables. This descriptive study analyzed findings to determine significant correlations or predictors of antidepressant adherence in soldiers with depression. Fifty-one participants, ranging from 24 to 36 years of age (M= 29 years of age) were recruited through Facebook™ (i.e., social media). After answering basic demographic and ‘insider’ knowledge, screening questions participants completed measures of medication adherence, illness perceptions, social support, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and alcohol use. Age and gender were the only variables significantly associated with medication adherence (r= -0.317, p= 0.024 and r= -0.331, p= 0.018) respectively and the only predictors of antidepressant medication adherence (R2= 0.206, Adjusted R2: 0.173, F: 6.234, p= 0.004). Antidepressant adherence scores indicated low levels of adherence. The findings of this study suggest those who are younger and are female United States Army soldiers may be more likely to report higher levels of antidepressant adherence.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Insel, Kathleen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAntidepressant Medication Adherence in Active Duty Army Soldiersen_US
dc.creatorGallagher, Shawn Patricken
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Shawn Patricken
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDepression can be painful, disabling, and result in fatal consequences. The most common treatment, antidepressant medication, can effectively treat depressive symptoms. Though, adhering to antidepressant medication treatment is a complex phenomenon that can elude even the most informed who suffers from depression. While much is known about antidepressant medication adherence in the general population, there is a dearth of knowledge about it in active duty United States Army soldiers with depression. The purpose of this research was to explore antidepressant adherence among United States Army soldiers with depression in relation to the potential correlates of illness perceptions, beliefs about medication, social support, and selected demographic variables. This descriptive study analyzed findings to determine significant correlations or predictors of antidepressant adherence in soldiers with depression. Fifty-one participants, ranging from 24 to 36 years of age (M= 29 years of age) were recruited through Facebook™ (i.e., social media). After answering basic demographic and ‘insider’ knowledge, screening questions participants completed measures of medication adherence, illness perceptions, social support, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and alcohol use. Age and gender were the only variables significantly associated with medication adherence (r= -0.317, p= 0.024 and r= -0.331, p= 0.018) respectively and the only predictors of antidepressant medication adherence (R2= 0.206, Adjusted R2: 0.173, F: 6.234, p= 0.004). Antidepressant adherence scores indicated low levels of adherence. The findings of this study suggest those who are younger and are female United States Army soldiers may be more likely to report higher levels of antidepressant adherence.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorInsel, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terryen
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamelaen
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