Probing Neural Communication by Expanding In Vivo Electrochemical and Electrophysiological Measurements

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/626155
Title:
Probing Neural Communication by Expanding In Vivo Electrochemical and Electrophysiological Measurements
Author:
Parent, Katherine L.
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 06-Oct-2019
Abstract:
Neural communication is imperative for physical and mental health. Dysfunction in either ionic signaling or chemical neurotransmission can cause debilitating disorders. Thus, study of neurotransmission is critical not only to answer important fundamental questions regarding learning, decision making, and behavior but also to gain information that can provide insight into the neurochemistry of neurological disorders and lead to improved treatments. The work presented herein describes the development of techniques and instrumentation to enable advancements in neuroscientific inquiry. The effect of different temporal patterns and durations of simulation of the prefrontal cortex on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens was examined and revealed a complex interaction that can help improve deep brain stimulation therapies. A measurement platform that combines electrophysiological and electrochemical techniques is described. The instrumentation is capable of concurrent monitoring of neural activity and dopamine release in vivo and in freely moving rodents. Analysis techniques to allow absolute quantification of tonic dopamine concentrations in vivo are detailed and the temporal resolution of the technique was vastly improved from ten minutes to forty seconds. An instrument that can simultaneously probe both dopamine and serotonin dynamics in either of their two temporal modes of signaling (tonic and phasic) using either fast-scan cyclic voltammetry or fast-scan controlled-adsorption voltammetry at two individually addressable microelectrodes is described. Together these new tools represent a significant step forward in the field of neuroanalytical chemistry by enable multiple brain regions, signaling modes (ionic flux in addition to both tonic and phasic neurotransmission), neurochemicals, and to be measured together.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Chemistry; Dopamine; Electrochemistry; Electrophysiology; Neurosciences
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Heien, Michael L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleProbing Neural Communication by Expanding In Vivo Electrochemical and Electrophysiological Measurementsen_US
dc.creatorParent, Katherine L.en
dc.contributor.authorParent, Katherine L.en
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 06-Oct-2019en
dc.description.abstractNeural communication is imperative for physical and mental health. Dysfunction in either ionic signaling or chemical neurotransmission can cause debilitating disorders. Thus, study of neurotransmission is critical not only to answer important fundamental questions regarding learning, decision making, and behavior but also to gain information that can provide insight into the neurochemistry of neurological disorders and lead to improved treatments. The work presented herein describes the development of techniques and instrumentation to enable advancements in neuroscientific inquiry. The effect of different temporal patterns and durations of simulation of the prefrontal cortex on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens was examined and revealed a complex interaction that can help improve deep brain stimulation therapies. A measurement platform that combines electrophysiological and electrochemical techniques is described. The instrumentation is capable of concurrent monitoring of neural activity and dopamine release in vivo and in freely moving rodents. Analysis techniques to allow absolute quantification of tonic dopamine concentrations in vivo are detailed and the temporal resolution of the technique was vastly improved from ten minutes to forty seconds. An instrument that can simultaneously probe both dopamine and serotonin dynamics in either of their two temporal modes of signaling (tonic and phasic) using either fast-scan cyclic voltammetry or fast-scan controlled-adsorption voltammetry at two individually addressable microelectrodes is described. Together these new tools represent a significant step forward in the field of neuroanalytical chemistry by enable multiple brain regions, signaling modes (ionic flux in addition to both tonic and phasic neurotransmission), neurochemicals, and to be measured together.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectChemistryen
dc.subjectDopamineen
dc.subjectElectrochemistryen
dc.subjectElectrophysiologyen
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHeien, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHeien, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAspinwall, Craig A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCowen, Stephen L.en
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