Coordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired By Heme Metabolites

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625889
Title:
Coordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired By Heme Metabolites
Author:
Gautam, Ritika
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 23-Aug-2019
Abstract:
Linear oligopyrroles are degradation products of heme, which is converted in the presence of heme oxygenase to bile pigments, such as biliverdin and bilirubin. These tetrapyrrolic oligopyrroles are ubiquitously present in biological systems and find applications in the fields of catalysis and sensing. These linear tetrapyrrolic scaffolds are further degraded into linear tripyrrolic and dipyrrolic fragments. Although these lower oligopyrroles are abundantly present, their coordination chemistry requires further characterization. This dissertation focuses mainly on two classes of bioinspired linear oligopyrroles, propentdyopent and tripyrrindione, and their transition metal complexes, which present a rich ligand-based redox chemistry. Chapter 1 offers an overview of heme degradation to different classes of linear oligopyrroles and properties of their transition metal complexes. Chapter 2 is focused on the tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of the urinary pigment uroerythrin, which coordinates divalent transition metals palladium and copper with square planar geometry. Specifically, the tripyrrin-1, 14-dione ligand binds Cu(II) and Pd(II) as a dianionic organic radical under ambient conditions. The electrochemical study confirms the presence of ligand based redox chemistry, and one electron oxidation or reduction reactions do not alter the planar geometry around the metal center. The X-Ray analysis and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the complexes in the solid and solution phase reveals intermolecular interactions between the ligand based unpaired electrons and therefore formation of neutral π-π dimers. In Chapter 3, the antioxidant activity and the fluorescence sensor properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand in the presence of superoxide are described. We found that the tripyrrindione ligand undergoes one-electron reduction in the presence of the superoxide radical anion (O2●–) to form highly fluorescent H3TD1●– radical anion, which emits at 635 nm. This reaction also explains the antioxidant properties of the linear tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand, which acts as a scavenger of O2●–. In Chapter 4, the zinc binding properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand are described. The tripyrrolic ligand coordinates as a dianionic ligand with the divalent Zn(II) ion in both organic and aqueous buffered conditions. The complex formed is highly fluorescent with a long wavelength emission band at 648 nm. The X-Ray crystallography analysis indicates the existence of dinuclear complex [Zn(TD1●)(H2O)]2, featuring a distorted square planar geometry around the Zn(II) center. In Chapter 5, the coordination chemistry of the dipyrrin-1,9-dione fragment of propentdyopent ligand is shown with a series of transition metals like (e.g., Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), which form homoleptic tetrahedral complexes. The spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization confirms that the complexes shows ligand-based redox chemistry and acts as reservoirs for unpaired electrons. Chapter 6 describes the formation of the fluorescent BODIPY complex of propentdyopent ligand. The dipyrrin-1,9-dione scaffold of heme metabolite propendyopent undergoes a one-pot reaction with borontrifluoride etherate in toluene to form a green fluorescent [(pdp)BF2] complex. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the meso-unsubstituted [(pdp)BF2] complex is stable in tetrahydrofuran and has a quantum yield of 0.13. Electrochemical studies confirm that the complex undergoes ligand-based reduction and acts as a host for an unpaired electron.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tomat, Elisa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCoordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired By Heme Metabolitesen_US
dc.creatorGautam, Ritikaen
dc.contributor.authorGautam, Ritikaen
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 23-Aug-2019en
dc.description.abstractLinear oligopyrroles are degradation products of heme, which is converted in the presence of heme oxygenase to bile pigments, such as biliverdin and bilirubin. These tetrapyrrolic oligopyrroles are ubiquitously present in biological systems and find applications in the fields of catalysis and sensing. These linear tetrapyrrolic scaffolds are further degraded into linear tripyrrolic and dipyrrolic fragments. Although these lower oligopyrroles are abundantly present, their coordination chemistry requires further characterization. This dissertation focuses mainly on two classes of bioinspired linear oligopyrroles, propentdyopent and tripyrrindione, and their transition metal complexes, which present a rich ligand-based redox chemistry. Chapter 1 offers an overview of heme degradation to different classes of linear oligopyrroles and properties of their transition metal complexes. Chapter 2 is focused on the tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of the urinary pigment uroerythrin, which coordinates divalent transition metals palladium and copper with square planar geometry. Specifically, the tripyrrin-1, 14-dione ligand binds Cu(II) and Pd(II) as a dianionic organic radical under ambient conditions. The electrochemical study confirms the presence of ligand based redox chemistry, and one electron oxidation or reduction reactions do not alter the planar geometry around the metal center. The X-Ray analysis and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the complexes in the solid and solution phase reveals intermolecular interactions between the ligand based unpaired electrons and therefore formation of neutral π-π dimers. In Chapter 3, the antioxidant activity and the fluorescence sensor properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand in the presence of superoxide are described. We found that the tripyrrindione ligand undergoes one-electron reduction in the presence of the superoxide radical anion (O2●–) to form highly fluorescent H3TD1●– radical anion, which emits at 635 nm. This reaction also explains the antioxidant properties of the linear tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand, which acts as a scavenger of O2●–. In Chapter 4, the zinc binding properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand are described. The tripyrrolic ligand coordinates as a dianionic ligand with the divalent Zn(II) ion in both organic and aqueous buffered conditions. The complex formed is highly fluorescent with a long wavelength emission band at 648 nm. The X-Ray crystallography analysis indicates the existence of dinuclear complex [Zn(TD1●)(H2O)]2, featuring a distorted square planar geometry around the Zn(II) center. In Chapter 5, the coordination chemistry of the dipyrrin-1,9-dione fragment of propentdyopent ligand is shown with a series of transition metals like (e.g., Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), which form homoleptic tetrahedral complexes. The spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization confirms that the complexes shows ligand-based redox chemistry and acts as reservoirs for unpaired electrons. Chapter 6 describes the formation of the fluorescent BODIPY complex of propentdyopent ligand. The dipyrrin-1,9-dione scaffold of heme metabolite propendyopent undergoes a one-pot reaction with borontrifluoride etherate in toluene to form a green fluorescent [(pdp)BF2] complex. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the meso-unsubstituted [(pdp)BF2] complex is stable in tetrahydrofuran and has a quantum yield of 0.13. Electrochemical studies confirm that the complex undergoes ligand-based reduction and acts as a host for an unpaired electron.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTomat, Elisaen
dc.contributor.committeememberTomat, Elisaen
dc.contributor.committeememberJewett, John C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMiranda, Katrina M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGlass, Richard S.en
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