Investigation of the Influence of Leaf Thickness on Canopy Reflectance and Physiological Traits in Upland and Pima Cotton Populations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625492
Title:
Investigation of the Influence of Leaf Thickness on Canopy Reflectance and Physiological Traits in Upland and Pima Cotton Populations
Author:
Pauli, Duke; White, Jeffrey W.; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Conley, Matthew M.; Heun, John; Thorp, Kelly R.; French, Andrew N.; Hunsaker, Douglas J.; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Wang, Guangyao; Gore, Michael A.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Agr & Biosyst Engn
Issue Date:
2017-08-17
Publisher:
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Citation:
Investigation of the Influence of Leaf Thickness on Canopy Reflectance and Physiological Traits in Upland and Pima Cotton Populations 2017, 8 Frontiers in Plant Science
Journal:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Rights:
Copyright © 2017 Pauli, White, Andrade-Sanchez, Conley, Heun, Thorp, French, Hunsaker, Carmo-Silva, Wang and Gore. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Many systems for field-based, high-throughput phenotyping (FB-HTP) quantify and characterize the reflected radiation from the crop canopy to derive phenotypes, as well as infer plant function and health status. However, given the technology's nascent status, it remains unknown how biophysical and physiological properties of the plant canopy impact downstream interpretation and application of canopy reflectance data. In that light, we assessed relationships between leaf thickness and several canopy-associated traits, including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which was collected via active reflectance sensors carried on a mobile FB-HTP system, carbon isotope discrimination (CID), and chlorophyll content. To investigate the relationships among traits, two distinct cotton populations, an upland (Gossypium hirsutum L.) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 95 lines and a Pima (G, barbaderise L.) population composed of 25 diverse cultivars, were evaluated under contrasting irrigation regimes, water-limited (WL) and well-watered pm conditions, across 3 years. We detected four quantitative trait loci (QTL) and significant variation in both populations for leaf thickness among genotypes as well as high estimates of broad-sense heritability (on average, above 0.7 for both populations), indicating a strong genetic basis for leaf thickness. Strong phenotypic correlations (maximum r = -0.73) were observed between leaf thickness and NDVI in the Pima population, but not the RIL population. Additionally, estimated genotypic correlations within the RIL population for leaf thickness with CID, chlorophyll content, and nitrogen discrimination (r(gij) = -0.32, 0.48, and 0.40, respectively) were all significant under WW but not WL conditions. Economically important fiber quality traits did not exhibit significant phenotypic or genotypic correlations with canopy traits. Overall, our results support considering variation in leaf thickness as a potential contributing factor to variation in NDVI or other canopy traits measured via proximal sensing, and as a trait that impacts fundamental physiological responses of plants.
Note:
Open access journal
ISSN:
1664-462X
DOI:
10.3389/fpls.2017.01405
Keywords:
abiotic stress; leaf thickness; canopy reflectance; cotton; high-throughput phenotyping; specific leaf weight
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Cotton Incorporated Fellowship; Core Project Funds; Cornell University startup funds; United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS); National Science Foundation [IOS1238187]
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2017.01405/full

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPauli, Dukeen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Jeffrey W.en
dc.contributor.authorAndrade-Sanchez, Pedroen
dc.contributor.authorConley, Matthew M.en
dc.contributor.authorHeun, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorThorp, Kelly R.en
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Andrew N.en
dc.contributor.authorHunsaker, Douglas J.en
dc.contributor.authorCarmo-Silva, Elizabeteen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Guangyaoen
dc.contributor.authorGore, Michael A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T15:44:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-14T15:44:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17-
dc.identifier.citationInvestigation of the Influence of Leaf Thickness on Canopy Reflectance and Physiological Traits in Upland and Pima Cotton Populations 2017, 8 Frontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn1664-462X-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2017.01405-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625492-
dc.description.abstractMany systems for field-based, high-throughput phenotyping (FB-HTP) quantify and characterize the reflected radiation from the crop canopy to derive phenotypes, as well as infer plant function and health status. However, given the technology's nascent status, it remains unknown how biophysical and physiological properties of the plant canopy impact downstream interpretation and application of canopy reflectance data. In that light, we assessed relationships between leaf thickness and several canopy-associated traits, including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which was collected via active reflectance sensors carried on a mobile FB-HTP system, carbon isotope discrimination (CID), and chlorophyll content. To investigate the relationships among traits, two distinct cotton populations, an upland (Gossypium hirsutum L.) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 95 lines and a Pima (G, barbaderise L.) population composed of 25 diverse cultivars, were evaluated under contrasting irrigation regimes, water-limited (WL) and well-watered pm conditions, across 3 years. We detected four quantitative trait loci (QTL) and significant variation in both populations for leaf thickness among genotypes as well as high estimates of broad-sense heritability (on average, above 0.7 for both populations), indicating a strong genetic basis for leaf thickness. Strong phenotypic correlations (maximum r = -0.73) were observed between leaf thickness and NDVI in the Pima population, but not the RIL population. Additionally, estimated genotypic correlations within the RIL population for leaf thickness with CID, chlorophyll content, and nitrogen discrimination (r(gij) = -0.32, 0.48, and 0.40, respectively) were all significant under WW but not WL conditions. Economically important fiber quality traits did not exhibit significant phenotypic or genotypic correlations with canopy traits. Overall, our results support considering variation in leaf thickness as a potential contributing factor to variation in NDVI or other canopy traits measured via proximal sensing, and as a trait that impacts fundamental physiological responses of plants.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCotton Incorporated Fellowship; Core Project Funds; Cornell University startup funds; United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS); National Science Foundation [IOS1238187]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2017.01405/fullen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2017 Pauli, White, Andrade-Sanchez, Conley, Heun, Thorp, French, Hunsaker, Carmo-Silva, Wang and Gore. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en
dc.subjectabiotic stressen
dc.subjectleaf thicknessen
dc.subjectcanopy reflectanceen
dc.subjectcottonen
dc.subjecthigh-throughput phenotypingen
dc.subjectspecific leaf weighten
dc.titleInvestigation of the Influence of Leaf Thickness on Canopy Reflectance and Physiological Traits in Upland and Pima Cotton Populationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Agr & Biosyst Engnen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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