Empirical determination of extreme ultraviolet imager background

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625486
Title:
Empirical determination of extreme ultraviolet imager background
Author:
Goldstein, J. ( 0000-0002-6715-7083 ) ; Gell, D.; Sandel, B. R. ( 0000-0002-5122-0033 )
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Lab
Issue Date:
2017-07
Publisher:
AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
Citation:
Empirical determination of extreme ultraviolet imager background 2017, 122 (7):7414 Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Journal:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Rights:
©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
We present an empirical determination of background levels of 30.4 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A survey of 6 months of data from the IMAGE EUV imager indicates a relatively low quiescent background level. The most probable quiescent background count rate is 2.7 per pixel, per 600 s EUV image, equivalent to a brightness of approximately 27 mR. This quiescent background rate is approximate to 10 times larger than the detector dark rate, indicating that quiescent background levels are dominated by external light sources or penetrating particles. We hypothesize two light sources of quiescent background in the interplanetary or interstellar medium. The first is 30.4 nm light from nonplasmaspheric He+. The second is 58.4 nm light (from neutral He) that gets past the filter/mirror. The IMAGE EUV data also exhibit episodic, factor of 3-to-30 increases above the quiescent background rate, throughout the 6 month data set considered herein. Comparison of these elevated background levels with solar EUV and solar wind parameters indicates several contributing causes during active periods, including solar wind energetic (50 keV to 5 MeV) particles, solar wind density/pressure, and solar 30.4 nm flux. Plain LanguageSummary In this paper we study how much background noise is found in images from the Extreme Ultraviolet (or EUV) imager. This imager flew on a NASA mission called IMAGE from 2000 to 2005. Determination of the EUV background level lets researchers make the most of the archival data set and also helps plan future missions with improved EUV imagers.
Note:
6 month embargo; published online: 24 July 2017
ISSN:
21699380
DOI:
10.1002/2017JA024301
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Southwest Research Institute internal funding [15-R8624]; development of the Tomographic Refilling and Erosion Observatory (TREO) Small Explorer proposal
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017JA024301

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, J.en
dc.contributor.authorGell, D.en
dc.contributor.authorSandel, B. R.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-13T16:26:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-13T16:26:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-
dc.identifier.citationEmpirical determination of extreme ultraviolet imager background 2017, 122 (7):7414 Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physicsen
dc.identifier.issn21699380-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2017JA024301-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625486-
dc.description.abstractWe present an empirical determination of background levels of 30.4 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A survey of 6 months of data from the IMAGE EUV imager indicates a relatively low quiescent background level. The most probable quiescent background count rate is 2.7 per pixel, per 600 s EUV image, equivalent to a brightness of approximately 27 mR. This quiescent background rate is approximate to 10 times larger than the detector dark rate, indicating that quiescent background levels are dominated by external light sources or penetrating particles. We hypothesize two light sources of quiescent background in the interplanetary or interstellar medium. The first is 30.4 nm light from nonplasmaspheric He+. The second is 58.4 nm light (from neutral He) that gets past the filter/mirror. The IMAGE EUV data also exhibit episodic, factor of 3-to-30 increases above the quiescent background rate, throughout the 6 month data set considered herein. Comparison of these elevated background levels with solar EUV and solar wind parameters indicates several contributing causes during active periods, including solar wind energetic (50 keV to 5 MeV) particles, solar wind density/pressure, and solar 30.4 nm flux. Plain LanguageSummary In this paper we study how much background noise is found in images from the Extreme Ultraviolet (or EUV) imager. This imager flew on a NASA mission called IMAGE from 2000 to 2005. Determination of the EUV background level lets researchers make the most of the archival data set and also helps plan future missions with improved EUV imagers.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSouthwest Research Institute internal funding [15-R8624]; development of the Tomographic Refilling and Erosion Observatory (TREO) Small Explorer proposalen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017JA024301en
dc.rights©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.titleEmpirical determination of extreme ultraviolet imager backgrounden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physicsen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 24 July 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionSpace Science and Engineering Division; Southwest Research Institute; San Antonio Texas USA-
dc.contributor.institutionSpace Science and Engineering Division; Southwest Research Institute; San Antonio Texas USA-
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA-
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