Content Delivery in Fog-Aided Small-Cell Systems with Offline and Online Caching: An Information—Theoretic Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625476
Title:
Content Delivery in Fog-Aided Small-Cell Systems with Offline and Online Caching: An Information—Theoretic Analysis
Author:
Azimi, Seyyed; Simeone, Osvaldo; Tandon, Ravi
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn
Issue Date:
2017-07-18
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Citation:
Content Delivery in Fog-Aided Small-Cell Systems with Offline and Online Caching: An Information—Theoretic Analysis 2017, 19 (7):366 Entropy
Journal:
Entropy
Rights:
© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The storage of frequently requested multimedia content at small-cell base stations (BSs) can reduce the load of macro-BSs without relying on high-speed backhaul links. In this work, the optimal operation of a system consisting of a cache-aided small-cell BS and a macro-BS is investigated for both offline and online caching settings. In particular, a binary fading one-sided interference channel is considered in which the small-cell BS, whose transmission is interfered by the macro-BS, has a limited-capacity cache. The delivery time per bit (DTB) is adopted as a measure of the coding latency, that is, the duration of the transmission block, required for reliable delivery. For offline caching, assuming a static set of popular contents, the minimum achievable DTB is characterized through information-theoretic achievability and converse arguments as a function of the cache capacity and of the capacity of the backhaul link connecting cloud and small-cell BS. For online caching, under a time-varying set of popular contents, the long-term (average) DTB is evaluated for both proactive and reactive caching policies. Furthermore, a converse argument is developed to characterize the minimum achievable long-term DTB for online caching in terms of the minimum achievable DTB for offline caching. The performance of both online and offline caching is finally compared using numerical results.
ISSN:
1099-4300
DOI:
10.3390/e19070366
Keywords:
edge caching; interference channel; information theory; latency; cloud RAN
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/19/7/366

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAzimi, Seyyeden
dc.contributor.authorSimeone, Osvaldoen
dc.contributor.authorTandon, Ravien
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T18:06:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-08T18:06:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.identifier.citationContent Delivery in Fog-Aided Small-Cell Systems with Offline and Online Caching: An Information—Theoretic Analysis 2017, 19 (7):366 Entropyen
dc.identifier.issn1099-4300-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/e19070366-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625476-
dc.description.abstractThe storage of frequently requested multimedia content at small-cell base stations (BSs) can reduce the load of macro-BSs without relying on high-speed backhaul links. In this work, the optimal operation of a system consisting of a cache-aided small-cell BS and a macro-BS is investigated for both offline and online caching settings. In particular, a binary fading one-sided interference channel is considered in which the small-cell BS, whose transmission is interfered by the macro-BS, has a limited-capacity cache. The delivery time per bit (DTB) is adopted as a measure of the coding latency, that is, the duration of the transmission block, required for reliable delivery. For offline caching, assuming a static set of popular contents, the minimum achievable DTB is characterized through information-theoretic achievability and converse arguments as a function of the cache capacity and of the capacity of the backhaul link connecting cloud and small-cell BS. For online caching, under a time-varying set of popular contents, the long-term (average) DTB is evaluated for both proactive and reactive caching policies. Furthermore, a converse argument is developed to characterize the minimum achievable long-term DTB for online caching in terms of the minimum achievable DTB for offline caching. The performance of both online and offline caching is finally compared using numerical results.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/19/7/366en
dc.rights© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.en
dc.subjectedge cachingen
dc.subjectinterference channelen
dc.subjectinformation theoryen
dc.subjectlatencyen
dc.subjectcloud RANen
dc.titleContent Delivery in Fog-Aided Small-Cell Systems with Offline and Online Caching: An Information—Theoretic Analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engnen
dc.identifier.journalEntropyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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