Portal of Transcendence: American Indian Interpretations of Arches and Bartlett Alcove in Southeastern Utah

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/625347
Title:
Portal of Transcendence: American Indian Interpretations of Arches and Bartlett Alcove in Southeastern Utah
Author:
Lim, Hyea Lim
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis largely explores ways in which American Indian views of time and space are expressed, with a specific focus on the concept of a portal. Traditional worldviews held by many American Indian groups translate time and space as nonlinear and nonexclusive; multiple spatial and temporal dimensions can exist simultaneously. Here, a physical medium that facilitates movement among the multiple, intangible dimensions, i.e., portal, is needed in order for the dimensions to be visited and thus be perceived as real. In many American Indian worldviews, the power of portal is often concentrated in certain natural and cultural components such as arches, alcoves, caves, and peckings and paintings on rock surfaces. In discussing the concept of portals, this thesis suggests two distinct landscapes as case studies: arches within Arches National Park (Arches NP) and an alcove with prominent rock paintings near Canyonlands National Park (Canyonlands NP). Discussion of these two case studies and their significance as portals help us to understand American Indian ways of perceiving landscapes and American Indian worldviews concerning time, space, as well as spirits. Eventually, this thesis aims to situate the two case studies within the wider discourse of portals that connect multiple temporal and spatial, and mundane and spiritual dimensions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
American Indian; Landscape; Native American; Philosophy; Portal
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePortal of Transcendence: American Indian Interpretations of Arches and Bartlett Alcove in Southeastern Utahen_US
dc.creatorLim, Hyea Limen
dc.contributor.authorLim, Hyea Limen
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis largely explores ways in which American Indian views of time and space are expressed, with a specific focus on the concept of a portal. Traditional worldviews held by many American Indian groups translate time and space as nonlinear and nonexclusive; multiple spatial and temporal dimensions can exist simultaneously. Here, a physical medium that facilitates movement among the multiple, intangible dimensions, i.e., portal, is needed in order for the dimensions to be visited and thus be perceived as real. In many American Indian worldviews, the power of portal is often concentrated in certain natural and cultural components such as arches, alcoves, caves, and peckings and paintings on rock surfaces. In discussing the concept of portals, this thesis suggests two distinct landscapes as case studies: arches within Arches National Park (Arches NP) and an alcove with prominent rock paintings near Canyonlands National Park (Canyonlands NP). Discussion of these two case studies and their significance as portals help us to understand American Indian ways of perceiving landscapes and American Indian worldviews concerning time, space, as well as spirits. Eventually, this thesis aims to situate the two case studies within the wider discourse of portals that connect multiple temporal and spatial, and mundane and spiritual dimensions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
dc.subjectLandscapeen
dc.subjectNative Americanen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectPortalen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richard W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberStoffle, Richard W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTrosper, Ronald L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedict J.en
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