Exemplar Variability Facilitates Word Learning by Children with Specific Language Impairment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/624159
Title:
Exemplar Variability Facilitates Word Learning by Children with Specific Language Impairment
Author:
Aguilar, Jessica M.
Issue Date:
2017
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research suggests that variability in the input plays an important role in learning language. The current study examined the role of object variability for word learning by preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). Seventeen 4- and 5-year-old children with SLI were taught eight new words in three short activities during the first three weeks of a six-week program. Half of the children saw three identical objects (No Variability group) corresponding to each target word during training, and the other half of the children saw three variable objects (High Variability group) corresponding to each target word during training. Children completed identification tests for objects seen during training and new within-category objects that were never seen to test generalization. Tests were administered the day after each training activity and three weeks after the last training session. There were no group differences on trained or generalization items immediately following training sessions. However, children in the High Variability group demonstrated significantly better learning, as measured by performance on generalization items, at retention testing three weeks after experimental training. These findings demonstrate that object variability facilitates retention of word learning by children with SLI.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Plante, Elena

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleExemplar Variability Facilitates Word Learning by Children with Specific Language Impairmenten_US
dc.creatorAguilar, Jessica M.en
dc.contributor.authorAguilar, Jessica M.en
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractResearch suggests that variability in the input plays an important role in learning language. The current study examined the role of object variability for word learning by preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). Seventeen 4- and 5-year-old children with SLI were taught eight new words in three short activities during the first three weeks of a six-week program. Half of the children saw three identical objects (No Variability group) corresponding to each target word during training, and the other half of the children saw three variable objects (High Variability group) corresponding to each target word during training. Children completed identification tests for objects seen during training and new within-category objects that were never seen to test generalization. Tests were administered the day after each training activity and three weeks after the last training session. There were no group differences on trained or generalization items immediately following training sessions. However, children in the High Variability group demonstrated significantly better learning, as measured by performance on generalization items, at retention testing three weeks after experimental training. These findings demonstrate that object variability facilitates retention of word learning by children with SLI.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPlante, Elenaen
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen
dc.contributor.committeememberAlt, Maryen
dc.contributor.committeememberFabiano-Smith, Leahen
dc.contributor.committeememberGómez, Rebeccaen
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