Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis of Clinical Outcomes of Fractures Fixed with the Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Intramedullary Nail

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/623535
Title:
Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis of Clinical Outcomes of Fractures Fixed with the Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Intramedullary Nail
Author:
Sonenthal, Nechama
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
18-May-2017
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
The (Surgical Implant Generation Network) SIGN Intramedullary (IM) nail is designed to fix long bone fractures without using a costly C‐arm imaging device. It is distributed for free to countries in need, allowing for elevation of care from the standard, lengthy traction treatment in those countries to clinically superior IM nailing. This paper compares the clinical outcomes of the SIGN IM nail to those of the IM nails used in developed countries with use of a C‐arm. The terms “Surgical Implant Generation Network” and “union” were searched in four databases. Primary studies of SIGN IM nails were included and their outcomes, including union rate, time to union, and complications, were recorded and compared to historical data of IM nails used in developed countries. Overall, there is a similar union rate in bones fixed with SIGN IM nails (94.6%) versus bones fixed with IM nails in developed countries (92.3%) (p = 0.009, OR = 1.67), while some bone types (tibia and femur) demonstrated a lower union rate when individually stratified (p = 0.008, OR = 0.26 and p = 0.002 and OR = 0.15, respectively). Mean time to union for all bone types combined showed no significant difference between SIGN IM nails and IM nails used in developed countries (p = 0.26). Complications rates were similar between SIGN IM nails and IM nails used in developed countries. It is possible for the SIGN IM nail to be used to fix long bone fractures in developing countries with outcomes comparable to the IM nail used in developed countries.
Keywords:
Systematic Review; Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN); Intramedullary Nail
MeSH Subjects:
Meta-Analysis as Topic; Patient Outcome Assessment; Review Literature as Topic; Fractures, Bone; Orthopedics; Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
McLaren, Alex MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSystematic Review and Meta‐Analysis of Clinical Outcomes of Fractures Fixed with the Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Intramedullary Nailen_US
dc.contributor.authorSonenthal, Nechamaen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2017-05-18-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractThe (Surgical Implant Generation Network) SIGN Intramedullary (IM) nail is designed to fix long bone fractures without using a costly C‐arm imaging device. It is distributed for free to countries in need, allowing for elevation of care from the standard, lengthy traction treatment in those countries to clinically superior IM nailing. This paper compares the clinical outcomes of the SIGN IM nail to those of the IM nails used in developed countries with use of a C‐arm. The terms “Surgical Implant Generation Network” and “union” were searched in four databases. Primary studies of SIGN IM nails were included and their outcomes, including union rate, time to union, and complications, were recorded and compared to historical data of IM nails used in developed countries. Overall, there is a similar union rate in bones fixed with SIGN IM nails (94.6%) versus bones fixed with IM nails in developed countries (92.3%) (p = 0.009, OR = 1.67), while some bone types (tibia and femur) demonstrated a lower union rate when individually stratified (p = 0.008, OR = 0.26 and p = 0.002 and OR = 0.15, respectively). Mean time to union for all bone types combined showed no significant difference between SIGN IM nails and IM nails used in developed countries (p = 0.26). Complications rates were similar between SIGN IM nails and IM nails used in developed countries. It is possible for the SIGN IM nail to be used to fix long bone fractures in developing countries with outcomes comparable to the IM nail used in developed countries.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectSystematic Reviewen
dc.subjectSurgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN)en
dc.subjectIntramedullary Nailen
dc.subject.meshMeta-Analysis as Topicen
dc.subject.meshPatient Outcome Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshReview Literature as Topicen
dc.subject.meshFractures, Boneen
dc.subject.meshOrthopedicsen
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorMcLaren, Alex MDen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.