Physicochemical Properties of a ‘Magic Mouthwash’ for Chemotherapy Induced Oral Mucositis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/623534
Title:
Physicochemical Properties of a ‘Magic Mouthwash’ for Chemotherapy Induced Oral Mucositis
Author:
Williams, Evan; Stearley, Jacob Dale
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To determine the solubility and stability of hydrocortisone in a ‘magic mouthwash; suspension. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to establish the most common ingredients in a ‘magic mouthwash’ suspension It was decided that the test suspension would consist of 75% commercially available diphenhydramine solution, 12.5% nystatin suspension (100,000 units/ml) , and 12.5% lidocaine solution (2% lidocaine). Powdered hydrocortisone was then added to the test suspensions at different concentrations and stored at 27C, 38C, and 48C. Aliquots were taken from each of the test samples at the time of compounding and at 4, 7, 13, 19, and 26 days to be analyzed by HPLC for degradation of hydrocortisone and percent hydrocortisone in suspension. RESULTS: At 27C, 98.5% of hydrocortisone was recovered after 26 days, versus 33.7% at 38C, and 7% at 48C. The solubility of hydrocortisone in the suspension was higher at higher temperatures, with 82% in solution at 48C, 70% at 38C, and 38% at 27C. CONCLUSION: The amount of hydrocortisone recovered deteriorated over time and at higher temperatures, and solubility of hydrocortisone in the suspension was greater at higher temperatures.
Description:
Class of 2011 Abstract
Keywords:
Oral Mucositis; Chemotherapy; Mouthwash; Magic Mouthwash; Hydrocortisone
Advisor:
Myrdal, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMyrdal, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Evanen
dc.contributor.authorStearley, Jacob Daleen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T17:31:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-18T17:31:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623534-
dc.descriptionClass of 2011 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the solubility and stability of hydrocortisone in a ‘magic mouthwash; suspension. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to establish the most common ingredients in a ‘magic mouthwash’ suspension It was decided that the test suspension would consist of 75% commercially available diphenhydramine solution, 12.5% nystatin suspension (100,000 units/ml) , and 12.5% lidocaine solution (2% lidocaine). Powdered hydrocortisone was then added to the test suspensions at different concentrations and stored at 27C, 38C, and 48C. Aliquots were taken from each of the test samples at the time of compounding and at 4, 7, 13, 19, and 26 days to be analyzed by HPLC for degradation of hydrocortisone and percent hydrocortisone in suspension. RESULTS: At 27C, 98.5% of hydrocortisone was recovered after 26 days, versus 33.7% at 38C, and 7% at 48C. The solubility of hydrocortisone in the suspension was higher at higher temperatures, with 82% in solution at 48C, 70% at 38C, and 38% at 27C. CONCLUSION: The amount of hydrocortisone recovered deteriorated over time and at higher temperatures, and solubility of hydrocortisone in the suspension was greater at higher temperatures.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectOral Mucositisen
dc.subjectChemotherapyen
dc.subjectMouthwashen
dc.subjectMagic Mouthwashen
dc.subjectHydrocortisoneen
dc.titlePhysicochemical Properties of a ‘Magic Mouthwash’ for Chemotherapy Induced Oral Mucositisen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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