Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/622829
Title:
Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico
Author:
Buechler, Stephanie
Affiliation:
School of Geography and Development and Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-11-22
Publisher:
Springer
Citation:
Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico 2016, 45 (S3):322 Ambio
Journal:
Ambio
Rights:
© The Author(s) 2016 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
With the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.
Note:
Published Open Access
ISSN:
0044-7447; 1654-7209
DOI:
10.1007/s13280-016-0832-3
Keywords:
Adaptation; Climate change; Feminist political ecology; Home gardens; Orchards; Water
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Science Foundation Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems [DEB-1010495]; Fulbright Garcia-Robles Border Grant; University of Arizona; Resource Center for Urban Agriculture and Food Security (RUAF), Leusden, the Netherlands
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13280-016-0832-3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBuechler, Stephanieen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-14T23:26:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-14T23:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-22-
dc.identifier.citationGendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico 2016, 45 (S3):322 Ambioen
dc.identifier.issn0044-7447-
dc.identifier.issn1654-7209-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13280-016-0832-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622829-
dc.description.abstractWith the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems [DEB-1010495]; Fulbright Garcia-Robles Border Grant; University of Arizona; Resource Center for Urban Agriculture and Food Security (RUAF), Leusden, the Netherlandsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13280-016-0832-3en
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2016 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en
dc.subjectAdaptationen
dc.subjectClimate changeen
dc.subjectFeminist political ecologyen
dc.subjectHome gardensen
dc.subjectOrchardsen
dc.subjectWateren
dc.titleGendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexicoen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Geography and Development and Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalAmbioen
dc.description.notePublished Open Accessen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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