Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/622644
Title:
Preventing Bark-Caused Increment Borer Jams: A Modified Technique For Core Extraction
Author:
Tyminski, William P.
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Carolina Tree-Ring Science Laboratory, Department of Geography
Issue Date:
2011-07
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Tyminski, W.P., 2011. Preventing bark-caused increment borer jams: A modified technique for core extraction. Tree-Ring Research 67(2):123-126.
Abstract:
When coring thick-barked trees, increment cores often become compressed and jammed inside the narrow region of the borer shaft. These jams can be problematic for two reasons: first, it often leaves the core unusable; second, the jam may be so tightly compressed in the borer that removal is difficult, especially in the field. Although procedures to evacuate these jams are documented in the literature, methods of prevention are not. Here, a modified manual method of increment boring that can reduce the likelihood of jams and, in addition, decrease the number of deformed core samples is described. Traditional and modified boring methods were randomly assigned to 40 Douglas-fir trees (80 cores) at a research site along the Oregon coast. Results show that jams were associated with traditional boring over six times more than with the proposed modified technique.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Increment Borer; Jam; Thick Bark
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTyminski, William P.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-22T21:13:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-22T21:13:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-07-
dc.identifier.citationTyminski, W.P., 2011. Preventing bark-caused increment borer jams: A modified technique for core extraction. Tree-Ring Research 67(2):123-126.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622644-
dc.description.abstractWhen coring thick-barked trees, increment cores often become compressed and jammed inside the narrow region of the borer shaft. These jams can be problematic for two reasons: first, it often leaves the core unusable; second, the jam may be so tightly compressed in the borer that removal is difficult, especially in the field. Although procedures to evacuate these jams are documented in the literature, methods of prevention are not. Here, a modified manual method of increment boring that can reduce the likelihood of jams and, in addition, decrease the number of deformed core samples is described. Traditional and modified boring methods were randomly assigned to 40 Douglas-fir trees (80 cores) at a research site along the Oregon coast. Results show that jams were associated with traditional boring over six times more than with the proposed modified technique.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectIncrement Boreren
dc.subjectJamen
dc.subjectThick Barken
dc.titlePreventing Bark-Caused Increment Borer Jams: A Modified Technique For Core Extractionen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro, Carolina Tree-Ring Science Laboratory, Department of Geographyen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
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