The Historical Dendroarchaeology Of The Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/622591
Title:
The Historical Dendroarchaeology Of The Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A.
Author:
Henderson, Joseph P.; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Van De Gevel, Saskia L.; Hart, Justin L.
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Science, Department of Geography, The University of Tennessee
Issue Date:
2009-01
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Henderson, J.P., Grissino-Mayer, H.D., van de Gevel, S.L., Hart, J.L., 2009. The historical dendroarchaeology of the Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A. Tree-Ring Research 65(1):37-45.
Abstract:
The Hoskins House is a two-story, single pen log structure located in Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina. The house is thought to have been built by Joseph Hoskins, who lived in Guilford County from 1778 until his death in 1799. Previous archaeological testing of soil around the house yielded over 1000 artifacts, and the ceramics of these gave a Mean Ceramic Date (MCD) of 1810 as a possible initial year of construction. Our objective was to date the outermost rings on as many logs as were accessible in the Hoskins House to determine the year or range of years when the house was likely built. We compared 37 ring-width measurement series from 28 white oak group logs with a composite reference chronology created from three oak reference chronologies from Virginia. We found that the logs were cut over a 3-year period from 1811 to 1813, lending credence to the initial MCD of 1810. Joseph Hoskins had already passed away in 1799 and the property was deeded to his two sons, Joseph and Ellis. Ellis Hoskins eventually was later deeded sole possession of the property. The two-story log house located at Tannenbaum Historic Park may be more correctly called the ‘‘Ellis Hoskins House’’ rather than the ‘‘Joseph Hoskins House.’’
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Historical Dendroarchaeology; Hoskins House; North Carolina; Southeastern U.S.
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Joseph P.en
dc.contributor.authorGrissino-Mayer, Henri D.en
dc.contributor.authorVan De Gevel, Saskia L.en
dc.contributor.authorHart, Justin L.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T00:01:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-17T00:01:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-
dc.identifier.citationHenderson, J.P., Grissino-Mayer, H.D., van de Gevel, S.L., Hart, J.L., 2009. The historical dendroarchaeology of the Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A. Tree-Ring Research 65(1):37-45.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622591-
dc.description.abstractThe Hoskins House is a two-story, single pen log structure located in Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina. The house is thought to have been built by Joseph Hoskins, who lived in Guilford County from 1778 until his death in 1799. Previous archaeological testing of soil around the house yielded over 1000 artifacts, and the ceramics of these gave a Mean Ceramic Date (MCD) of 1810 as a possible initial year of construction. Our objective was to date the outermost rings on as many logs as were accessible in the Hoskins House to determine the year or range of years when the house was likely built. We compared 37 ring-width measurement series from 28 white oak group logs with a composite reference chronology created from three oak reference chronologies from Virginia. We found that the logs were cut over a 3-year period from 1811 to 1813, lending credence to the initial MCD of 1810. Joseph Hoskins had already passed away in 1799 and the property was deeded to his two sons, Joseph and Ellis. Ellis Hoskins eventually was later deeded sole possession of the property. The two-story log house located at Tannenbaum Historic Park may be more correctly called the ‘‘Ellis Hoskins House’’ rather than the ‘‘Joseph Hoskins House.’’en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectHistorical Dendroarchaeologyen
dc.subjectHoskins Houseen
dc.subjectNorth Carolinaen
dc.subjectSoutheastern U.S.en
dc.titleThe Historical Dendroarchaeology Of The Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A.en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Science, Department of Geography, The University of Tennesseeen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
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