Dendrochronological Potential Of Japanese Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii): A Case Study In The Black Rock Forest, New York

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/622587
Title:
Dendrochronological Potential Of Japanese Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii): A Case Study In The Black Rock Forest, New York
Author:
Li, Jinbao; Xu, Chengyuan; Griffin, Kevin L.; Schuster, William S. F.
Affiliation:
Tree-Ring Laboratory, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University; Marine Biology, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University; CSIRO Entomology, 120 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australia; Black Rock Forest Consortium, 129 Continental Road, Cornwall, NY 12518, USA
Issue Date:
2008-12
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Li, J., Xu, C., Griffin, K.L., Schuster, W.S.F., 2008. Dendrochronological potential of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii): A case study in the Black Rock Forest, New York. Tree-Ring Research 64(2):115-124.
Abstract:
The deciduous forests of northeastern United States are currently experiencing an invasion of the exotic plant species Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii). This recent and rapid invasion leads to rising concern about its potential threats to native species as well as natural ecosystems, demanding a better understanding of its invasion mechanisms and potential responses to climate change. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted to understand the influence of climate on the growth of B. thunbergii, largely because of the absence of long-term growth records. In this study we demonstrate growth rings of B. thunbergii are annually resolved and crossdatable. The first ring-width chronology of B. thunbergii was therefore developed using samples collected from the Black Rock Forest (BRF), New York. Climate-growth relationship analysis indicates the growth of B. thunbergii in the BRF is positively correlated with precipitation in prior October, current February and May–August, but is negatively correlated with current March precipitation. The growth of B. thunbergii is also negatively correlated with temperatures in prior winter (November–January) and current summer (June–July), but is positively correlated with current spring temperature (March–May). These dendrochronological results on B. thunbergii, together with further physiological studies, will improve our understanding on how the growth of this invasive species is affected by local climate dynamics, as well as the long-term invasion potential that is tied to its responses to climate change.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Berberis thunbergii; Japanese Barberry; Black Rock Forest; Invasive Species; Climate
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jinbaoen
dc.contributor.authorXu, Chengyuanen
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Kevin L.en
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, William S. F.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-16T19:48:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-16T19:48:36Z-
dc.date.issued2008-12-
dc.identifier.citationLi, J., Xu, C., Griffin, K.L., Schuster, W.S.F., 2008. Dendrochronological potential of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii): A case study in the Black Rock Forest, New York. Tree-Ring Research 64(2):115-124.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622587-
dc.description.abstractThe deciduous forests of northeastern United States are currently experiencing an invasion of the exotic plant species Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii). This recent and rapid invasion leads to rising concern about its potential threats to native species as well as natural ecosystems, demanding a better understanding of its invasion mechanisms and potential responses to climate change. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted to understand the influence of climate on the growth of B. thunbergii, largely because of the absence of long-term growth records. In this study we demonstrate growth rings of B. thunbergii are annually resolved and crossdatable. The first ring-width chronology of B. thunbergii was therefore developed using samples collected from the Black Rock Forest (BRF), New York. Climate-growth relationship analysis indicates the growth of B. thunbergii in the BRF is positively correlated with precipitation in prior October, current February and May–August, but is negatively correlated with current March precipitation. The growth of B. thunbergii is also negatively correlated with temperatures in prior winter (November–January) and current summer (June–July), but is positively correlated with current spring temperature (March–May). These dendrochronological results on B. thunbergii, together with further physiological studies, will improve our understanding on how the growth of this invasive species is affected by local climate dynamics, as well as the long-term invasion potential that is tied to its responses to climate change.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectBerberis thunbergiien
dc.subjectJapanese Barberryen
dc.subjectBlack Rock Foresten
dc.subjectInvasive Speciesen
dc.subjectClimateen
dc.titleDendrochronological Potential Of Japanese Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii): A Case Study In The Black Rock Forest, New Yorken_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentTree-Ring Laboratory, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Biology, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentCSIRO Entomology, 120 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentBlack Rock Forest Consortium, 129 Continental Road, Cornwall, NY 12518, USAen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.