A bacterial filter protects and structures the gut microbiome of an insect

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/621059
Title:
A bacterial filter protects and structures the gut microbiome of an insect
Author:
Lanan, Michele Caroline; Pos Rodrigues, Pedro Augusto; Agellon, Al; Jansma, Patricia; Wheeler, Diana Esther
Affiliation:
Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in Entomology and Insect Science, University of Arizona; School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Arizona; Department of Neuroscience, University of Arizona; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-08
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Lanan MC, Rodrigues PAP, Agellon A, Jansma P, Wheeler DE. A bacterial filter protects and structures the gut microbiome of an insect. The ISME Journal. 2016;10(8):1866-1876. doi:10.1038/ismej.2015.264.
Journal:
The ISME Journal
Rights:
© 2016 International Society for Microbial Ecology. All rights reserved
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Associations with symbionts within the gut lumen of hosts are particularly prone to disruption due to the constant influx of ingested food and non-symbiotic microbes, yet we know little about how partner fidelity is maintained. Here we describe for the first time the existence of a gut morphological filter capable of protecting an animal gut microbiome from disruption. The proventriculus, a valve located between the crop and midgut of insects, functions as a micro-pore filter in the Sonoran Desert turtle ant (Cephalotes rohweri), blocking the entry of bacteria and particles ⩾0.2 μm into the midgut and hindgut while allowing passage of dissolved nutrients. Initial establishment of symbiotic gut bacteria occurs within the first few hours after pupation via oral–rectal trophallaxis, before the proventricular filter develops. Cephalotes ants are remarkable for having maintained a consistent core gut microbiome over evolutionary time and this partner fidelity is likely enabled by the proventricular filtering mechanism. In addition, the structure and function of the cephalotine proventriculus offers a new perspective on organismal resistance to pathogenic microbes, structuring of gut microbial communities, and development and maintenance of host–microbe fidelity both during the animal life cycle and over evolutionary time.
Note:
Open access.
PubMed ID:
26872040
PubMed Central ID:
5029173
DOI:
10.1038/ismej.2015.264
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
This work was funded by NIH grant 5K12GM000708-13. PAPR received support from NSF Grant 0604067 to DEW.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/v10/n8/full/ismej2015264a.html

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLanan, Michele Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorPos Rodrigues, Pedro Augustoen
dc.contributor.authorAgellon, Alen
dc.contributor.authorJansma, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Diana Estheren
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-18T22:18:51Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-18T22:18:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-
dc.identifier.citationLanan MC, Rodrigues PAP, Agellon A, Jansma P, Wheeler DE. A bacterial filter protects and structures the gut microbiome of an insect. The ISME Journal. 2016;10(8):1866-1876. doi:10.1038/ismej.2015.264.en
dc.identifier.pmid26872040-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ismej.2015.264-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621059-
dc.description.abstractAssociations with symbionts within the gut lumen of hosts are particularly prone to disruption due to the constant influx of ingested food and non-symbiotic microbes, yet we know little about how partner fidelity is maintained. Here we describe for the first time the existence of a gut morphological filter capable of protecting an animal gut microbiome from disruption. The proventriculus, a valve located between the crop and midgut of insects, functions as a micro-pore filter in the Sonoran Desert turtle ant (Cephalotes rohweri), blocking the entry of bacteria and particles ⩾0.2 μm into the midgut and hindgut while allowing passage of dissolved nutrients. Initial establishment of symbiotic gut bacteria occurs within the first few hours after pupation via oral–rectal trophallaxis, before the proventricular filter develops. Cephalotes ants are remarkable for having maintained a consistent core gut microbiome over evolutionary time and this partner fidelity is likely enabled by the proventricular filtering mechanism. In addition, the structure and function of the cephalotine proventriculus offers a new perspective on organismal resistance to pathogenic microbes, structuring of gut microbial communities, and development and maintenance of host–microbe fidelity both during the animal life cycle and over evolutionary time.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by NIH grant 5K12GM000708-13. PAPR received support from NSF Grant 0604067 to DEW.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/v10/n8/full/ismej2015264a.htmlen
dc.rights© 2016 International Society for Microbial Ecology. All rights reserveden
dc.titleA bacterial filter protects and structures the gut microbiome of an insecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate Interdisciplinary Program in Entomology and Insect Science, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neuroscience, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Entomology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalThe ISME Journalen
dc.identifier.pmcid5029173-
dc.description.noteOpen access.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.