Interactions of Wildfire, Landscape Position, and Soil Depth in Structuring Post-Fire Soil Microbial Communities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/621017
Title:
Interactions of Wildfire, Landscape Position, and Soil Depth in Structuring Post-Fire Soil Microbial Communities
Author:
Murphy, Margretta A.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Landscape position and depth in the soil column influence the movement of microbial substrate throughout a catchment, from upslope areas to downslope areas, thereby impacting nutrient cycling rates and capabilities of the microbial communities in those areas. Wildfire also shapes the biogeochemistry of the landscape, creating a mosaic with variations in substrate type and concentration that also influence microbial communities and biogeochemical cycling. Nitrogen (N) in particular is altered by wildfire, as it is easily volatilized and the removal of organic matter (OM) reduces N inputs. We aimed to understand how landscape position and soil depth, first and foremost, influence microbial communities and their N-cycling, but also how this may differ from wildfires and their relative impacts on the soil microbial communities. Landscape position proved to influence few soil and microbial characteristics, while movement from soil surface to deep in the column and the incidence of wildfire caused many variations in soil physical and biogeochemical cycling properties. The interaction of landscape position and soil depth also showed little variation in any measurements, while wildfire and soil depth interactions showed drastic changes that indicate high order controls over the soil microbial community. It can be surmised that while landscape position is important for many soil properties, it is soil depth and wildfire that truly control the soil microbial communities and their N-cycling capabilities.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Landscape position; Microbial Biomass; Microbial Ecology; Nitrogen cycle; Wildfire; Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Biogeochemical cycle
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rich, Virginia; Gallery, Rachel E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInteractions of Wildfire, Landscape Position, and Soil Depth in Structuring Post-Fire Soil Microbial Communitiesen_US
dc.creatorMurphy, Margretta A.en
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Margretta A.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractLandscape position and depth in the soil column influence the movement of microbial substrate throughout a catchment, from upslope areas to downslope areas, thereby impacting nutrient cycling rates and capabilities of the microbial communities in those areas. Wildfire also shapes the biogeochemistry of the landscape, creating a mosaic with variations in substrate type and concentration that also influence microbial communities and biogeochemical cycling. Nitrogen (N) in particular is altered by wildfire, as it is easily volatilized and the removal of organic matter (OM) reduces N inputs. We aimed to understand how landscape position and soil depth, first and foremost, influence microbial communities and their N-cycling, but also how this may differ from wildfires and their relative impacts on the soil microbial communities. Landscape position proved to influence few soil and microbial characteristics, while movement from soil surface to deep in the column and the incidence of wildfire caused many variations in soil physical and biogeochemical cycling properties. The interaction of landscape position and soil depth also showed little variation in any measurements, while wildfire and soil depth interactions showed drastic changes that indicate high order controls over the soil microbial community. It can be surmised that while landscape position is important for many soil properties, it is soil depth and wildfire that truly control the soil microbial communities and their N-cycling capabilities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectLandscape positionen
dc.subjectMicrobial Biomassen
dc.subjectMicrobial Ecologyen
dc.subjectNitrogen cycleen
dc.subjectWildfireen
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen
dc.subjectBiogeochemical cycleen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRich, Virginiaen
dc.contributor.advisorGallery, Rachel E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberChorover, Jonen
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