Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/621015
Title:
No evidence for contagious yawning in lemurs
Author:
MacLean, Evan L.; Reddy, Rachna B.; Krupenye, Christopher; Hare, Brian
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Sch Anthropol
Issue Date:
2016-09
Publisher:
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Citation:
Reddy, R.B., Krupenye, C., MacLean, E.L. et al. Anim Cogn (2016) 19: 889. doi:10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1
Journal:
ANIMAL COGNITION
Rights:
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Among some haplorhine primates, including humans, relaxed yawns spread contagiously. Such contagious yawning has been linked to social bonds and empathy in some species. However, no studies have investigated contagious yawning in strepsirhines. We conducted an experimental study of contagious yawning in strepsirhines, testing ring-tailed and ruffed lemurs (n = 24) in a paradigm similar to one that has induced contagious yawning in haplorhines. First, in a control experiment, we investigated whether lemurs responded to projected video content in general (experiment 1). We showed them two videos to which we expected differential responses: one featured a terrestrial predator and the other a caretaker holding food. Next, to test for yawn contagion, we showed individual lemurs life-size video projections of groupmates and conspecific strangers yawning, and control footage of the same individuals at rest (experiment 2). Then, to examine whether a group context might enhance or allow for contagion, we exposed subjects to the same videos in a group setting (experiment 3). Lemurs produced alarm vocalizations and moved upward while viewing the predator, but not the caretaker, demonstrating that they do perceive video content meaningfully. However, lemurs did not yawn in response to yawning stimuli when tested alone, or with their groupmates. This study provides preliminary evidence that lemurs do not respond to yawning stimuli similarly to haplorhines, and suggests that this behavior may have evolved or become more exaggerated in haplorhines after the two major primate lineages split.
Note:
Published online 13 April 2016. 12 Month Embargo.
ISSN:
1435-9448
PubMed ID:
27075549
DOI:
10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1
Keywords:
Lemurs; Lemurs; Strepsirhine; Emotional contagion
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
Undergraduate Research Support office at Duke University; Molly H. Glander Student Research Grant from the Duke Lemur Center; NSF GRFP [DGE-1256260, DGE-1106401]
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacLean, Evan L.en
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Rachna B.en
dc.contributor.authorKrupenye, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorHare, Brianen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T20:46:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T20:46:08Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-
dc.identifier.citationReddy, R.B., Krupenye, C., MacLean, E.L. et al. Anim Cogn (2016) 19: 889. doi:10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1en
dc.identifier.issn1435-9448-
dc.identifier.pmid27075549-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621015-
dc.description.abstractAmong some haplorhine primates, including humans, relaxed yawns spread contagiously. Such contagious yawning has been linked to social bonds and empathy in some species. However, no studies have investigated contagious yawning in strepsirhines. We conducted an experimental study of contagious yawning in strepsirhines, testing ring-tailed and ruffed lemurs (n = 24) in a paradigm similar to one that has induced contagious yawning in haplorhines. First, in a control experiment, we investigated whether lemurs responded to projected video content in general (experiment 1). We showed them two videos to which we expected differential responses: one featured a terrestrial predator and the other a caretaker holding food. Next, to test for yawn contagion, we showed individual lemurs life-size video projections of groupmates and conspecific strangers yawning, and control footage of the same individuals at rest (experiment 2). Then, to examine whether a group context might enhance or allow for contagion, we exposed subjects to the same videos in a group setting (experiment 3). Lemurs produced alarm vocalizations and moved upward while viewing the predator, but not the caretaker, demonstrating that they do perceive video content meaningfully. However, lemurs did not yawn in response to yawning stimuli when tested alone, or with their groupmates. This study provides preliminary evidence that lemurs do not respond to yawning stimuli similarly to haplorhines, and suggests that this behavior may have evolved or become more exaggerated in haplorhines after the two major primate lineages split.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUndergraduate Research Support office at Duke University; Molly H. Glander Student Research Grant from the Duke Lemur Center; NSF GRFP [DGE-1256260, DGE-1106401]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSPRINGER HEIDELBERGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-016-0986-1en
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016en
dc.subjectLemursen
dc.subjectLemursen
dc.subjectStrepsirhineen
dc.subjectEmotional contagionen
dc.titleNo evidence for contagious yawning in lemursen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Anthropolen
dc.identifier.journalANIMAL COGNITIONen
dc.description.notePublished online 13 April 2016. 12 Month Embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
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