Improving Seed Spacing Uniformity of Precision Vegetable Planters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620909
Title:
Improving Seed Spacing Uniformity of Precision Vegetable Planters
Author:
Siemens, M.C.; Gayler, R.R.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
ASABE
Citation:
Siemens, M.C., & Gayler, R.R. (2016). Improving seed spacing uniformity of precision vegetable planters. Appl. Eng. Agric., 32(5), 579-587. DOI 10.13031/aea.32.11721.
Journal:
Applied Engineering in Agriculture
Rights:
© 2016 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Equidistant, uniform seed placement is important in lettuce production as seeds are densely planted within the row, typically only about 5 cm apart. When seeds are sown too close together, it is time consuming to thin seedlings to the desired plant spacing of 20 to 30 cm by hand and very difficult to do mechanically. The overall goal of the project was to improve lettuce seed placement accuracy and reduce the percentage of seeds spaced closely together. Specific objectives were: 1) to compare vacuum and belt-type planters to determine which style of planter provides better planting performance, 2) to evaluate belt planter seeding performance with different types of furrow openers, and 3) to develop practical modifications for vacuum planters to improve lettuce seed placement accuracy. Three vacuum planter configurations, an unmodified and two reduced seed drop height designs and a belt planter equipped with two types of furrow openers were tested in situ with pelleted lettuce seed at four travel speeds ranging from 1.6 to 4.0 kph. Belt planter performance was significantly better than that of the vacuum planter. Vacuum and belt planters both provided acceptable levels of performance at speeds below 2.4 kph, but at higher speeds, seed placement accuracy declined rapidly. No differences in planter performance were found between the two belt planter configurations tested. The mid-level drop height vacuum planter configuration had significantly better seed placement precision and fewer closely spaced seed spacings as compared to the unmodified vacuum planter. These findings illustrate the significant effect planter type, travel speed, and drop height have on planter performance. They also contradict the common perception that vacuum planters deliver seed more precisely and with fewer closely-spaced seeds as compared to belt planters. Further study is needed to determine the extent to which planter performance affects hand thinning labor costs, automated machine performance, final plant stand uniformity, and crop yield.
Note:
If my manuscript is accepted for publication by ASABE, I hereby assign and transfer to ASABE all right, title, and interest in and to the copyright in said manuscript. ASABE in turn hereby grants to the author and, in the case of a work made for hire, his or her employer, a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to use and distribute the article by print, email, employer website, or personal website, provided that each copy includes the copyright notice appearing on the published article.
ISSN:
0883-8542
DOI:
10.13031/aea.32.11721
Keywords:
Accuracy; Belt planters; Lettuce; Planters; Precision; Seed spacing; Thinning; Uniformity; Vacuum planters
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
The Arizona Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Consultation and Training provided partial project funding using Specialty Crop Block Grant funds provided by the USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service. The views or findings presented are the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, the State of Arizona or the USDA.
Additional Links:
http://elibrary.asabe.org/abstract.asp?aid=46280

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSiemens, M.C.en
dc.contributor.authorGayler, R.R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T23:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-11T23:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationSiemens, M.C., & Gayler, R.R. (2016). Improving seed spacing uniformity of precision vegetable planters. Appl. Eng. Agric., 32(5), 579-587. DOI 10.13031/aea.32.11721.en
dc.identifier.issn0883-8542-
dc.identifier.doi10.13031/aea.32.11721-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/620909-
dc.description.abstractEquidistant, uniform seed placement is important in lettuce production as seeds are densely planted within the row, typically only about 5 cm apart. When seeds are sown too close together, it is time consuming to thin seedlings to the desired plant spacing of 20 to 30 cm by hand and very difficult to do mechanically. The overall goal of the project was to improve lettuce seed placement accuracy and reduce the percentage of seeds spaced closely together. Specific objectives were: 1) to compare vacuum and belt-type planters to determine which style of planter provides better planting performance, 2) to evaluate belt planter seeding performance with different types of furrow openers, and 3) to develop practical modifications for vacuum planters to improve lettuce seed placement accuracy. Three vacuum planter configurations, an unmodified and two reduced seed drop height designs and a belt planter equipped with two types of furrow openers were tested in situ with pelleted lettuce seed at four travel speeds ranging from 1.6 to 4.0 kph. Belt planter performance was significantly better than that of the vacuum planter. Vacuum and belt planters both provided acceptable levels of performance at speeds below 2.4 kph, but at higher speeds, seed placement accuracy declined rapidly. No differences in planter performance were found between the two belt planter configurations tested. The mid-level drop height vacuum planter configuration had significantly better seed placement precision and fewer closely spaced seed spacings as compared to the unmodified vacuum planter. These findings illustrate the significant effect planter type, travel speed, and drop height have on planter performance. They also contradict the common perception that vacuum planters deliver seed more precisely and with fewer closely-spaced seeds as compared to belt planters. Further study is needed to determine the extent to which planter performance affects hand thinning labor costs, automated machine performance, final plant stand uniformity, and crop yield.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Arizona Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Consultation and Training provided partial project funding using Specialty Crop Block Grant funds provided by the USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service. The views or findings presented are the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, the State of Arizona or the USDA.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherASABEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://elibrary.asabe.org/abstract.asp?aid=46280en
dc.rights© 2016 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineersen
dc.subjectAccuracyen
dc.subjectBelt plantersen
dc.subjectLettuceen
dc.subjectPlantersen
dc.subjectPrecisionen
dc.subjectSeed spacingen
dc.subjectThinningen
dc.subjectUniformityen
dc.subjectVacuum plantersen
dc.titleImproving Seed Spacing Uniformity of Precision Vegetable Plantersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Engineering in Agricultureen
dc.description.noteIf my manuscript is accepted for publication by ASABE, I hereby assign and transfer to ASABE all right, title, and interest in and to the copyright in said manuscript. ASABE in turn hereby grants to the author and, in the case of a work made for hire, his or her employer, a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to use and distribute the article by print, email, employer website, or personal website, provided that each copy includes the copyright notice appearing on the published article.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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