Heritage Greens Consumption: A Qualitative Exploration of Cultural Agency in the Southern Arizona Food System

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620865
Title:
Heritage Greens Consumption: A Qualitative Exploration of Cultural Agency in the Southern Arizona Food System
Author:
De Koker, Teresa Rene
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Abstract Throughout history, wild green vegetables have played a significant role in human diets around the world, coevolving alongside agriculture and changing land use patterns (Wilson, 1990). Wild greens such as purslane (Portulaca oleracea), lambquarters (Chenopodium spp.) and amaranth (Amaranthus spp.), wild ancestors of crop plants, are prehistoric foods that are cultural and nutritional mainstays in many parts of the world including the Arizona-Mexico borderland region. While consumption of these foods is commonplace on the Mexican side of the border, on the American side their use is less frequent. In this study, I explore the patterns of and barriers to consumption of wild green vegetables by Latinos living in the Arizona (AZ)-Mexico (MX) borderland city of Tucson, AZ. I use Weber's rationalization theory, as well as human agency theory, to guide my exploration of how the dominant food system contributes to dietary acculturation and the loss of agency among Latinos living in Tucson. In-depth interviews and naturalistic observations are employed across a diverse array of market settings, which include a farmers' market, several carniceri­as (Mexican butcher shops), a corner store/tortilleria with procurers and purveyors of Latino and indigenous foods, and a more conventional supermarket. The findings reveal a reduction in knowledge and consumption of heritage greens by Latinos concurrent to their adoption of more mainstream American foods. I consider this pattern and its various implications in the context of the rationalization of the dominant U.S. food system, which leads to a dynamic that favors efficiency and productivity over authenticity and aesthetics.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Dietary Acculturation; Food Systems; Heritage Foods; Rationalization; Wild Greens; Agricultural Education; Cultural Agency
Degree Name:
M.A.E.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mars, Matthew

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHeritage Greens Consumption: A Qualitative Exploration of Cultural Agency in the Southern Arizona Food Systemen_US
dc.creatorDe Koker, Teresa Reneen
dc.contributor.authorDe Koker, Teresa Reneen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Throughout history, wild green vegetables have played a significant role in human diets around the world, coevolving alongside agriculture and changing land use patterns (Wilson, 1990). Wild greens such as purslane (Portulaca oleracea), lambquarters (Chenopodium spp.) and amaranth (Amaranthus spp.), wild ancestors of crop plants, are prehistoric foods that are cultural and nutritional mainstays in many parts of the world including the Arizona-Mexico borderland region. While consumption of these foods is commonplace on the Mexican side of the border, on the American side their use is less frequent. In this study, I explore the patterns of and barriers to consumption of wild green vegetables by Latinos living in the Arizona (AZ)-Mexico (MX) borderland city of Tucson, AZ. I use Weber's rationalization theory, as well as human agency theory, to guide my exploration of how the dominant food system contributes to dietary acculturation and the loss of agency among Latinos living in Tucson. In-depth interviews and naturalistic observations are employed across a diverse array of market settings, which include a farmers' market, several carniceri­as (Mexican butcher shops), a corner store/tortilleria with procurers and purveyors of Latino and indigenous foods, and a more conventional supermarket. The findings reveal a reduction in knowledge and consumption of heritage greens by Latinos concurrent to their adoption of more mainstream American foods. I consider this pattern and its various implications in the context of the rationalization of the dominant U.S. food system, which leads to a dynamic that favors efficiency and productivity over authenticity and aesthetics.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectDietary Acculturationen
dc.subjectFood Systemsen
dc.subjectHeritage Foodsen
dc.subjectRationalizationen
dc.subjectWild Greensen
dc.subjectAgricultural Educationen
dc.subjectCultural Agencyen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.E.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMars, Matthewen
dc.contributor.committeememberTorres, Roberten
dc.contributor.committeememberQuist, Tanyaen
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