Religious Devotion: Piety, Print, and Practice in Mexico City, 1750-1821

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620855
Title:
Religious Devotion: Piety, Print, and Practice in Mexico City, 1750-1821
Author:
Mehas, Shayna Rene
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mexico City experienced a dramatic increase in the publication of religious devotionals that promoted individual prayer in the late eighteenth and into the nineteenth century. These publications reveal a focus on the individual's internal spirituality, a characteristic of enlightened thinking, and the emphasis on a new form of piety being disseminated by the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Simultaneously, they were directed at a new readership among ordinary men and women, more of whom were literate, a product of recent reforms in primary education. This increase in the distribution and availability of these libritos and the growth of a new readership were indicative of a boom in print production and culture (coinciding with an ease in book censorship) and the influx of Enlightenment thinking (and subsequent reforms) on both an official and unofficial level. This dissertation examines the trends in religious devotion, print culture, education and literacy that were established during the second half of the eighteenth century through the struggle for Independence (1750-1821). It has been claimed that studying such practices, especially as they were experienced in the nineteenth century, is practically impossible due to their hidden nature, a claim rooted in the idea that characteristics of religiosity are inherently individual and familial, and so evaded documentation. I argue against this notion and demonstrate that sources on religious devotions and practices for this period, have not yet been closely examined. At the same time, I explore the shift in the prominence of religious practice from a baroque Tridentine form of Catholicism to a new form of piety (new piety) and how this new piety was extended to women and children as Bourbons confronted their place in society.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Education; New Piety; Print; Religion; Women and Children; History; Colonial Mexico
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gosner, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleReligious Devotion: Piety, Print, and Practice in Mexico City, 1750-1821en_US
dc.creatorMehas, Shayna Reneen
dc.contributor.authorMehas, Shayna Reneen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMexico City experienced a dramatic increase in the publication of religious devotionals that promoted individual prayer in the late eighteenth and into the nineteenth century. These publications reveal a focus on the individual's internal spirituality, a characteristic of enlightened thinking, and the emphasis on a new form of piety being disseminated by the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Simultaneously, they were directed at a new readership among ordinary men and women, more of whom were literate, a product of recent reforms in primary education. This increase in the distribution and availability of these libritos and the growth of a new readership were indicative of a boom in print production and culture (coinciding with an ease in book censorship) and the influx of Enlightenment thinking (and subsequent reforms) on both an official and unofficial level. This dissertation examines the trends in religious devotion, print culture, education and literacy that were established during the second half of the eighteenth century through the struggle for Independence (1750-1821). It has been claimed that studying such practices, especially as they were experienced in the nineteenth century, is practically impossible due to their hidden nature, a claim rooted in the idea that characteristics of religiosity are inherently individual and familial, and so evaded documentation. I argue against this notion and demonstrate that sources on religious devotions and practices for this period, have not yet been closely examined. At the same time, I explore the shift in the prominence of religious practice from a baroque Tridentine form of Catholicism to a new form of piety (new piety) and how this new piety was extended to women and children as Bourbons confronted their place in society.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectNew Pietyen
dc.subjectPrinten
dc.subjectReligionen
dc.subjectWomen and Childrenen
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectColonial Mexicoen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGosner, Kevinen
dc.contributor.committeememberGosner, Kevinen
dc.contributor.committeememberFew, Marthaen
dc.contributor.committeememberBeezley, William H.en
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