Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620853
Title:
Essays in Experimental Economics
Author:
Weigel, Collin
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Human behavior is incredibly complex, but it drives how our society functions. Economists have recently taken greater interest in understanding the decisions that people make, rather than prescribing optimal actions to take. The first two chapters of this dissertation contribute to the field of behavioral economics by using incentivized and unambiguous settings to determine if people base their decisions, in part, on sunk costs. Though standard economic theory would insist that sunk costs do not matter, I find that, at least in small stakes, sunk costs have about 10% the effect on decisions as profit does. Further, I find that sunk effort, even small amounts, can affect decisions, making one more likely to continue along the course of action for which they committed the effort. My third chapter surveys people's perceptions of contributions to judicial campaigns. I find that the distinction between signed and unsigned solicitations from a judge does not produce significantly different expected outcomes. Also, I find no evidence of a difference in the expected fines based on the race and gender of the judge.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Experimental; Economics; Behavioral
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reynolds, Stanley

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEssays in Experimental Economicsen_US
dc.creatorWeigel, Collinen
dc.contributor.authorWeigel, Collinen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractHuman behavior is incredibly complex, but it drives how our society functions. Economists have recently taken greater interest in understanding the decisions that people make, rather than prescribing optimal actions to take. The first two chapters of this dissertation contribute to the field of behavioral economics by using incentivized and unambiguous settings to determine if people base their decisions, in part, on sunk costs. Though standard economic theory would insist that sunk costs do not matter, I find that, at least in small stakes, sunk costs have about 10% the effect on decisions as profit does. Further, I find that sunk effort, even small amounts, can affect decisions, making one more likely to continue along the course of action for which they committed the effort. My third chapter surveys people's perceptions of contributions to judicial campaigns. I find that the distinction between signed and unsigned solicitations from a judge does not produce significantly different expected outcomes. Also, I find no evidence of a difference in the expected fines based on the race and gender of the judge.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectExperimentalen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectBehavioralen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorReynolds, Stanleyen
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Stanleyen
dc.contributor.committeememberDufwenberg, Martinen
dc.contributor.committeememberNoussair, Charlesen
dc.contributor.committeememberStegeman, Marken
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