Chicano Studies: Proliferation of the Discipline and the Formal Institutionalization of Community Engagement, 1965 to Present

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620852
Title:
Chicano Studies: Proliferation of the Discipline and the Formal Institutionalization of Community Engagement, 1965 to Present
Author:
Hill Zuganelli, Dee
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is a comparative study of the formal institutionalization of Chicana/o Studies programs in four-year colleges and universities between 1970 and the present, and of how variations in institutionalization create different community engagement dynamics for Latina/o populations both on- and off-campus. This research examines the impact of program and university-level characteristics on the formal institutionalization of these programs and the embedding of community engagement within program mission statements. Moreover, the dissertation examines tensions, balancing acts, and trade-offs between achieving program stability and satisfying legitimizing demands of academic labor. Program-level characteristics include formal classification as either a Chicana/o Studies program or cognate (e.g., Mexican American Studies, Hispanic Studies, Latin American Studies, etc.) or a more generalist ethnic studies program (e.g., ethnic studies, cultural studies, American Studies, etc.). University-level characteristics include locus of control (i.e., public or private universities), institutional wealth, total student body and minority enrollments, histories of campus protest, and regional diffusion. The findings indicate complex and distinguishable relationships among program classification, formal program institutionalization, and community engagement prospects; and that predictors for institutionalization partially predict efforts to work with minority populations off-campus. Complicating these relationships suggests a need to consider variations in program-level institutionalization and dedicate future work to this level.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Community Engagement; Complex Organizations; Ethnic Studies; Institutionalization; Outreach; Sociology; Chicana/o Studies
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stryker, Robin; Fernandez, Celestino

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleChicano Studies: Proliferation of the Discipline and the Formal Institutionalization of Community Engagement, 1965 to Presenten_US
dc.creatorHill Zuganelli, Deeen
dc.contributor.authorHill Zuganelli, Deeen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a comparative study of the formal institutionalization of Chicana/o Studies programs in four-year colleges and universities between 1970 and the present, and of how variations in institutionalization create different community engagement dynamics for Latina/o populations both on- and off-campus. This research examines the impact of program and university-level characteristics on the formal institutionalization of these programs and the embedding of community engagement within program mission statements. Moreover, the dissertation examines tensions, balancing acts, and trade-offs between achieving program stability and satisfying legitimizing demands of academic labor. Program-level characteristics include formal classification as either a Chicana/o Studies program or cognate (e.g., Mexican American Studies, Hispanic Studies, Latin American Studies, etc.) or a more generalist ethnic studies program (e.g., ethnic studies, cultural studies, American Studies, etc.). University-level characteristics include locus of control (i.e., public or private universities), institutional wealth, total student body and minority enrollments, histories of campus protest, and regional diffusion. The findings indicate complex and distinguishable relationships among program classification, formal program institutionalization, and community engagement prospects; and that predictors for institutionalization partially predict efforts to work with minority populations off-campus. Complicating these relationships suggests a need to consider variations in program-level institutionalization and dedicate future work to this level.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCommunity Engagementen
dc.subjectComplex Organizationsen
dc.subjectEthnic Studiesen
dc.subjectInstitutionalizationen
dc.subjectOutreachen
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.subjectChicana/o Studiesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorStryker, Robinen
dc.contributor.advisorFernandez, Celestinoen
dc.contributor.committeememberStryker, Robinen
dc.contributor.committeememberFernandez, Celestinoen
dc.contributor.committeememberLeahey, Erinen
dc.contributor.committeememberCabrera, Nolan L.en
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