Effects of Fresh Frozen Plasma on Post-Op Bleeding in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620837
Title:
Effects of Fresh Frozen Plasma on Post-Op Bleeding in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Author:
Balajadia Jr, Arturo Dillomes
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Severe congenital heart disease (CHD) is diagnosed in the United States 147.4 times per 100,000 live births, excluding still births and abortions^1. With the advancement of diagnostic methods, prenatal care, and screening modalities, the total CHD birth prevalence has increased substantially^2. In turn, this increases the number of cardiac surgery cases. With the advancement of technology and cardiac surgery, smaller and younger patients are undergoing more complex cardiac procedures that involve cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Neonates and infants undergoing CPB are susceptible to adverse effects of CPB on the coagulation cascade due to their smaller weight and hematologic immaturity^3,4. In addition to these physiological issues in neonates and infants, CPB decreases circulating coagulation factors and anti- thrombin III levels to 50% and platelet counts to 70%^5, which can contribute to the post-operative bleeding.During CPB, neonates' and infants' coagulation factors become extremely diluted causing multiple coagulation defects^6. Optimizing the CPB circuit volume and the use of anti-fibrinolytic, packed red blood cells (pRBCs), platelets, cryoprecipitate, and ultrafiltration are among the most widely used methods in preserving and aiding coagulation factors^3,7-9. Another method of improving hemodilution-related coagulation dysfunction bleeding is by transfusing Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP)^10. However, there are only a small number of articles focusing on the effect of FFP in post-operative bleeding in neonates and infants following complex cardiac surgery with CPB. I postulate that adding FFP during CPB will lower the possibility of patients to experience post-operational bleeding, thus, shortening their length of stay (LOS).
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Cardiopulmonary Bypass; Fresh Frozen Plasma; Pediatrics; Post-operational Bleeding; Medical Pharmacology; Cardiac
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Medical Pharmacology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vanderah, Todd; French, Edward

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEffects of Fresh Frozen Plasma on Post-Op Bleeding in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypassen_US
dc.creatorBalajadia Jr, Arturo Dillomesen
dc.contributor.authorBalajadia Jr, Arturo Dillomesen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractSevere congenital heart disease (CHD) is diagnosed in the United States 147.4 times per 100,000 live births, excluding still births and abortions^1. With the advancement of diagnostic methods, prenatal care, and screening modalities, the total CHD birth prevalence has increased substantially^2. In turn, this increases the number of cardiac surgery cases. With the advancement of technology and cardiac surgery, smaller and younger patients are undergoing more complex cardiac procedures that involve cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Neonates and infants undergoing CPB are susceptible to adverse effects of CPB on the coagulation cascade due to their smaller weight and hematologic immaturity^3,4. In addition to these physiological issues in neonates and infants, CPB decreases circulating coagulation factors and anti- thrombin III levels to 50% and platelet counts to 70%^5, which can contribute to the post-operative bleeding.During CPB, neonates' and infants' coagulation factors become extremely diluted causing multiple coagulation defects^6. Optimizing the CPB circuit volume and the use of anti-fibrinolytic, packed red blood cells (pRBCs), platelets, cryoprecipitate, and ultrafiltration are among the most widely used methods in preserving and aiding coagulation factors^3,7-9. Another method of improving hemodilution-related coagulation dysfunction bleeding is by transfusing Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP)^10. However, there are only a small number of articles focusing on the effect of FFP in post-operative bleeding in neonates and infants following complex cardiac surgery with CPB. I postulate that adding FFP during CPB will lower the possibility of patients to experience post-operational bleeding, thus, shortening their length of stay (LOS).en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectCardiopulmonary Bypassen
dc.subjectFresh Frozen Plasmaen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectPost-operational Bleedingen
dc.subjectMedical Pharmacologyen
dc.subjectCardiacen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMedical Pharmacologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorVanderah, Todden
dc.contributor.advisorFrench, Edwarden
dc.contributor.committeememberLargent-Milnes, Tallyen
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