Evolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620830
Title:
Evolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredients
Author:
Higginson, Dawn M.; Belloni, Virginia; Davis, Sarah N.; Morrison, Erin S.; Andrews, John E.; Badyaev, Alexander V.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol
Issue Date:
2016-05-18
Publisher:
ROYAL SOC
Citation:
Dawn M. Higginson, Virginia Belloni, Sarah N. Davis, Erin S. Morrison, John E. Andrews, Alexander V. Badyaev Proc. R. Soc. B 2016 283 20160403; DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.0403. Published 18 May 2016
Journal:
PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Rights:
© 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The evolutionarily persistent and widespread use of carotenoid pigments in animal coloration contrasts with their biochemical instability. Consequently, evolution of carotenoid-based displays should include mechanisms to accommodate or limit pigment degradation. In birds, this could involve two strategies: (i) evolution of a moult immediately prior to the mating season, enabling the use of particularly fast-degrading carotenoids and (ii) evolution of the ability to stabilize dietary carotenoids through metabolic modification or association with feather keratins. Here, we examine evolutionary lability and transitions between the two strategies across 126 species of birds. We report that species that express mostly unmodified, fast-degrading, carotenoids have pre-breeding moults, and a particularly short time between carotenoid deposition and the subsequent breeding season. Species that expressed mostly slow-degrading carotenoids in their plumage accomplished this through increased metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids, and the selective expression of these slow-degrading compounds. In these species, the timing of moult was not associated with carotenoid composition of plumage displays. Using repeated samples from individuals of one species, we found that metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids significantly slowed their degradation between moult and breeding season. Thus, the most complex and colourful ornamentation is likely the most biochemically stable in birds, and depends less on ecological factors, such as moult timing and migration tendency. We suggest that coevolution of metabolic modification, selective expression and biochemical stability of plumage carotenoids enables the use of unstable pigments in long-term evolutionary trends in plumage coloration.
Note:
Published 18 May 2016. 12 month embargo
ISSN:
0962-8452
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2016.0403
Keywords:
biochemical stability; carotenoids; evolutionary transitions; integration; moult
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
National Science Foundation [DEB-0077804, IBN-0218313]; David and Lucile Packard Foundation; National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health [K12GM000708]; REU; UBRP programme at the University of Arizona
Additional Links:
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1831/20160403

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHigginson, Dawn M.en
dc.contributor.authorBelloni, Virginiaen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Sarah N.en
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Erin S.en
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, John E.en
dc.contributor.authorBadyaev, Alexander V.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-06T21:53:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-06T21:53:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-18-
dc.identifier.citationDawn M. Higginson, Virginia Belloni, Sarah N. Davis, Erin S. Morrison, John E. Andrews, Alexander V. Badyaev Proc. R. Soc. B 2016 283 20160403; DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.0403. Published 18 May 2016en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2016.0403-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/620830-
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionarily persistent and widespread use of carotenoid pigments in animal coloration contrasts with their biochemical instability. Consequently, evolution of carotenoid-based displays should include mechanisms to accommodate or limit pigment degradation. In birds, this could involve two strategies: (i) evolution of a moult immediately prior to the mating season, enabling the use of particularly fast-degrading carotenoids and (ii) evolution of the ability to stabilize dietary carotenoids through metabolic modification or association with feather keratins. Here, we examine evolutionary lability and transitions between the two strategies across 126 species of birds. We report that species that express mostly unmodified, fast-degrading, carotenoids have pre-breeding moults, and a particularly short time between carotenoid deposition and the subsequent breeding season. Species that expressed mostly slow-degrading carotenoids in their plumage accomplished this through increased metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids, and the selective expression of these slow-degrading compounds. In these species, the timing of moult was not associated with carotenoid composition of plumage displays. Using repeated samples from individuals of one species, we found that metabolic modification of dietary carotenoids significantly slowed their degradation between moult and breeding season. Thus, the most complex and colourful ornamentation is likely the most biochemically stable in birds, and depends less on ecological factors, such as moult timing and migration tendency. We suggest that coevolution of metabolic modification, selective expression and biochemical stability of plumage carotenoids enables the use of unstable pigments in long-term evolutionary trends in plumage coloration.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [DEB-0077804, IBN-0218313]; David and Lucile Packard Foundation; National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health [K12GM000708]; REU; UBRP programme at the University of Arizonaen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherROYAL SOCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1831/20160403en
dc.rights© 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectbiochemical stabilityen
dc.subjectcarotenoidsen
dc.subjectevolutionary transitionsen
dc.subjectintegrationen
dc.subjectmoulten
dc.titleEvolution of long-term coloration trends with biochemically unstable ingredientsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen
dc.identifier.journalPROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCESen
dc.description.notePublished 18 May 2016. 12 month embargoen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
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