An Examination of the Impact of Direct Peer Influence and Social Norms on Youth Participation in Structured Activities and Substance Use

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620825
Title:
An Examination of the Impact of Direct Peer Influence and Social Norms on Youth Participation in Structured Activities and Substance Use
Author:
Wiggs, Christine Bracamonte
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During adolescence many youth spend increasing amounts of time gaining new knowledge and skills outside of their home in environments such as structured afterschool activities. In these settings, youth have meaningful opportunities to explore new interests, develop varied competencies, and seek social support from peers and adults. As youth get older rates of participation in structured activities decline. Given the role that structured activities can play in nurturing positive youth development, gaining a better understanding of how peers may affect youth's choice to participate in structured activities is important. This study used logistic regression to examine the role of peer influence and how the perceptions of close friends (direct peer influence) and other peers (social norms) impact a youth's decision to participate in structured activities as well as use alcohol and marijuana. Additionally, the association between youth participation in structured activities and reported use of alcohol and marijuana was examined. Study results indicated that youth who reported engaging in specific types of structured activities, specifically performing arts and volunteering, reported lower rates of alcohol and marijuana use respectively. Direct peer influence was an important factor in substance use whereby for each additional best friend a youth had that participated in school activities, students were less likely to have used alcohol or marijuana. Findings are interpreted using an ecological systems perspective and demonstrate that gaining a better understanding of the influence that direct peers and social norms exert on youth behavior has important implications for promoting the positive development of youth.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Peer Influence; Positive Youth Development; Substance Use; Family & Consumer Sciences; Adolescence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family & Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Romero, Andrea; Stevens, Sally J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAn Examination of the Impact of Direct Peer Influence and Social Norms on Youth Participation in Structured Activities and Substance Useen_US
dc.creatorWiggs, Christine Bracamonteen
dc.contributor.authorWiggs, Christine Bracamonteen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDuring adolescence many youth spend increasing amounts of time gaining new knowledge and skills outside of their home in environments such as structured afterschool activities. In these settings, youth have meaningful opportunities to explore new interests, develop varied competencies, and seek social support from peers and adults. As youth get older rates of participation in structured activities decline. Given the role that structured activities can play in nurturing positive youth development, gaining a better understanding of how peers may affect youth's choice to participate in structured activities is important. This study used logistic regression to examine the role of peer influence and how the perceptions of close friends (direct peer influence) and other peers (social norms) impact a youth's decision to participate in structured activities as well as use alcohol and marijuana. Additionally, the association between youth participation in structured activities and reported use of alcohol and marijuana was examined. Study results indicated that youth who reported engaging in specific types of structured activities, specifically performing arts and volunteering, reported lower rates of alcohol and marijuana use respectively. Direct peer influence was an important factor in substance use whereby for each additional best friend a youth had that participated in school activities, students were less likely to have used alcohol or marijuana. Findings are interpreted using an ecological systems perspective and demonstrate that gaining a better understanding of the influence that direct peers and social norms exert on youth behavior has important implications for promoting the positive development of youth.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectPeer Influenceen
dc.subjectPositive Youth Developmenten
dc.subjectSubstance Useen
dc.subjectFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
dc.subjectAdolescenceen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRomero, Andreaen
dc.contributor.advisorStevens, Sally J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRomero, Andreaen
dc.contributor.committeememberStevens, Sally J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, Micheleen
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