THE SPANISH COLONIAL EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY OF SAN AGUSTIN DEL TUCSON: A CASE STUDY OF SPANISH COLONIAL FAILURE

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620721
Title:
THE SPANISH COLONIAL EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY OF SAN AGUSTIN DEL TUCSON: A CASE STUDY OF SPANISH COLONIAL FAILURE
Author:
Young, Monica Zappia
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the 1690s, Father Kino described Tucson as a highly suitable place to establish a mission community. Once founded, Mission San Agustin del Tucson became a visit a of the neighboring Mission San Xavier del Bac, which served as the cabecera. After Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1821, the nearby Pima village of El Pueblito was abandoned, and the mission fell into ruin as the church property was homesteaded, given away, or sold. Physical evidence of the mission, including a convento and gardens, was further compromised after a brick manufacturing plant and, later, a landfill took their toll on the archaeological record. By the middle of the twentieth century, the last evidence of the mission era was destroyed. Mission San Agustin can be interpreted as an example of colonial failure that does not conform to traditional culture contact models of a unilinear sequence from diffusion to acculturation and, ultimately, to assimilation. San Agustin was for a short period a thriving, productive, complex mission community that overshadowed its neighboring cabecera, San Xavier del Bac. Using a historical archaeological approach, this paper describes the cultural context in which Tucson's mission was constructed, abandoned, fell into ruin, and disappeared. Major historical events and processes are suggested as possible causes for this failure.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mission San Agustín del Tucson (Tucson, Ariz.) -- History.; Missions -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Indians of North America--Arizona -- Tucson -- History.; Indians, Treatment of--Arizona -- Tucson -- History.; Acculturation.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE SPANISH COLONIAL EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY OF SAN AGUSTIN DEL TUCSON: A CASE STUDY OF SPANISH COLONIAL FAILUREen_US
dc.creatorYoung, Monica Zappiaen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Monica Zappiaen
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn the 1690s, Father Kino described Tucson as a highly suitable place to establish a mission community. Once founded, Mission San Agustin del Tucson became a visit a of the neighboring Mission San Xavier del Bac, which served as the cabecera. After Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1821, the nearby Pima village of El Pueblito was abandoned, and the mission fell into ruin as the church property was homesteaded, given away, or sold. Physical evidence of the mission, including a convento and gardens, was further compromised after a brick manufacturing plant and, later, a landfill took their toll on the archaeological record. By the middle of the twentieth century, the last evidence of the mission era was destroyed. Mission San Agustin can be interpreted as an example of colonial failure that does not conform to traditional culture contact models of a unilinear sequence from diffusion to acculturation and, ultimately, to assimilation. San Agustin was for a short period a thriving, productive, complex mission community that overshadowed its neighboring cabecera, San Xavier del Bac. Using a historical archaeological approach, this paper describes the cultural context in which Tucson's mission was constructed, abandoned, fell into ruin, and disappeared. Major historical events and processes are suggested as possible causes for this failure.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
dc.subjectMission San Agustín del Tucson (Tucson, Ariz.) -- History.en
dc.subjectMissions -- Arizona -- Tucson.en
dc.subjectIndians of North America--Arizona -- Tucson -- History.en
dc.subjectIndians, Treatment of--Arizona -- Tucson -- History.en
dc.subjectAcculturation.en
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen
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