The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA): Using Rainfall and Streamflow Records from Burned Watersheds to Evaluate and Improve Parameter Estimations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620717
Title:
The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA): Using Rainfall and Streamflow Records from Burned Watersheds to Evaluate and Improve Parameter Estimations
Author:
Sheppard, Brian Scott
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Precipitation and runoff records from several burned watersheds have been used to evaluate the performance of the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool as it is used to assign parameters to the KINmatic runoff and EROSion Model 2 (KINEROS2). This modeling scheme is used by the Department of Interior Burned Area Emergency Response (DOI BAER) teams to assess flooding and erosion risk immediately following a wildfire. Although DOI BAER teams use this parameterization/modeling framework to assess the relative change in watershed behavior following a wildfire by driving the model with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) design storms, calibrations performed on actual events using rainfall estimations provided by rain gages and radar to drive the model provides insight into the model's performance, and potentially informs changes and developments to the AGWA parameter estimation scheme. Results indicate that current parameter modifications made by AGWA to represent fire impacts provide reasonable results for DOI BAER relative change risk assessments, though additional modifications to saturated hydraulic conductivity may be necessary to represent a broader range of storm intensity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Hydrology
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meixner, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA): Using Rainfall and Streamflow Records from Burned Watersheds to Evaluate and Improve Parameter Estimationsen_US
dc.creatorSheppard, Brian Scotten
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Brian Scotten
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrecipitation and runoff records from several burned watersheds have been used to evaluate the performance of the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool as it is used to assign parameters to the KINmatic runoff and EROSion Model 2 (KINEROS2). This modeling scheme is used by the Department of Interior Burned Area Emergency Response (DOI BAER) teams to assess flooding and erosion risk immediately following a wildfire. Although DOI BAER teams use this parameterization/modeling framework to assess the relative change in watershed behavior following a wildfire by driving the model with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) design storms, calibrations performed on actual events using rainfall estimations provided by rain gages and radar to drive the model provides insight into the model's performance, and potentially informs changes and developments to the AGWA parameter estimation scheme. Results indicate that current parameter modifications made by AGWA to represent fire impacts provide reasonable results for DOI BAER relative change risk assessments, though additional modifications to saturated hydraulic conductivity may be necessary to represent a broader range of storm intensity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectHydrologyen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMeixner, Thomasen
dc.contributor.committeememberValdes, Juan B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodrich, David C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Philipen
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