Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620715
Title:
Long-Term Recovery in Aphasia
Author:
Goodman, Mara Lee
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Language recovery was examined in 108 individuals with aphasia in the chronic phase of recovery who participated in various forms of aphasia treatment over extended periods of time. The Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was administered at multiple time points and Aphasia Quotient (AQ) scores were used as a measure of language performance over time. As a group, the cohort showed an improvement of +6.52 AQ points, yielding an average rate of change of +4.07 AQ points per year. The rate of change was greatest at earlier times post onset (between three months and two years), and improvement was greatest for individuals with aphasia in the moderate severity range. Age, sex, and fluency did not have a significant effect on recovery. Education level had marginal predictive value in the direction of those with less education showing greater rate of improvement. These results suggest that language recovery continues during the chronic stage for individuals who are involved in some form of rehabilitation activity, especially in individuals with aphasia of moderate severity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Language recovery; Longitudinal; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Aphasia
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beeson, Pelagie M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLong-Term Recovery in Aphasiaen_US
dc.creatorGoodman, Mara Leeen
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Mara Leeen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractLanguage recovery was examined in 108 individuals with aphasia in the chronic phase of recovery who participated in various forms of aphasia treatment over extended periods of time. The Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was administered at multiple time points and Aphasia Quotient (AQ) scores were used as a measure of language performance over time. As a group, the cohort showed an improvement of +6.52 AQ points, yielding an average rate of change of +4.07 AQ points per year. The rate of change was greatest at earlier times post onset (between three months and two years), and improvement was greatest for individuals with aphasia in the moderate severity range. Age, sex, and fluency did not have a significant effect on recovery. Education level had marginal predictive value in the direction of those with less education showing greater rate of improvement. These results suggest that language recovery continues during the chronic stage for individuals who are involved in some form of rehabilitation activity, especially in individuals with aphasia of moderate severity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectLanguage recoveryen
dc.subjectLongitudinalen
dc.subjectSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen
dc.subjectAphasiaen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pelagie M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Stephen M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHawley, Janet M.en
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