'Thinking Things Together': What Contemplative Practice Can Offer Academic Writing Instruction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620714
Title:
'Thinking Things Together': What Contemplative Practice Can Offer Academic Writing Instruction
Author:
Chaterdon, Catherine
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
"'Thinking Things Together': What Contemplative Practice Can Offer Academic Writing Instruction," calls for the inclusion of contemplative practices (e.g., mindfulness meditation, visualization, deep listening, reflective journaling, etc.) in the instruction of writing, due to their potential to foster more self-efficacy in the writing process. Because recent research has linked contemplative practices to improved cognition, they are especially well-suited to facilitate writing, which is-at least in part-a cognitive act. In other words, the common denominator of composition studies and contemplative practice is cognition. However, composition studies has failed to make this connection because the field has been largely dismissive of cognitivist writing research, and has neglected to stay abreast of recent research on cognition and writing. By presenting recent research on the cognitive processes involved in the production of text, as well as recent research on the effects of meditation on the brain (pioneered in the emerging field of contemplative neuroscience), this transdisciplinary project highlights the points at which these two bodies of research converge. Two systematic literature reviews (SLRs) of these-seemingly disparate-areas of research reveal that they share interests in the cognitive processes of executive function, working memory, attention, motivation, and self-regulation. Furthermore, a meta-synthesis of the research conducted on these cognitive processes illustrates how contemplative neuroscience can inform-and improve-the theory and practice of teaching writing. Specifically, I provide readers with classroom activities and assignments that implement contemplative practices in the writing classroom in empirically-informed and effective ways.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Composition Pedagogy; Contemplative Neuroscience; Contemplative Practice; Mindfulness; Writing Studies; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Cognition and Writing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McAllister, Ken

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.title'Thinking Things Together': What Contemplative Practice Can Offer Academic Writing Instructionen_US
dc.creatorChaterdon, Catherineen
dc.contributor.authorChaterdon, Catherineen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstract"'Thinking Things Together': What Contemplative Practice Can Offer Academic Writing Instruction," calls for the inclusion of contemplative practices (e.g., mindfulness meditation, visualization, deep listening, reflective journaling, etc.) in the instruction of writing, due to their potential to foster more self-efficacy in the writing process. Because recent research has linked contemplative practices to improved cognition, they are especially well-suited to facilitate writing, which is-at least in part-a cognitive act. In other words, the common denominator of composition studies and contemplative practice is cognition. However, composition studies has failed to make this connection because the field has been largely dismissive of cognitivist writing research, and has neglected to stay abreast of recent research on cognition and writing. By presenting recent research on the cognitive processes involved in the production of text, as well as recent research on the effects of meditation on the brain (pioneered in the emerging field of contemplative neuroscience), this transdisciplinary project highlights the points at which these two bodies of research converge. Two systematic literature reviews (SLRs) of these-seemingly disparate-areas of research reveal that they share interests in the cognitive processes of executive function, working memory, attention, motivation, and self-regulation. Furthermore, a meta-synthesis of the research conducted on these cognitive processes illustrates how contemplative neuroscience can inform-and improve-the theory and practice of teaching writing. Specifically, I provide readers with classroom activities and assignments that implement contemplative practices in the writing classroom in empirically-informed and effective ways.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectComposition Pedagogyen
dc.subjectContemplative Neuroscienceen
dc.subjectContemplative Practiceen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectWriting Studiesen
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
dc.subjectCognition and Writingen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcAllister, Kenen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Kenen
dc.contributor.committeememberMapes, Aimeeen
dc.contributor.committeememberRamirez, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.committeememberWildner-Bassett, Maryen
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