Variability in Antisocial and Prosocial Behaviors in Early Adolescence: Contributions of Peer Behavior and Perceptions of Adult and Peer Feedback

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620696
Title:
Variability in Antisocial and Prosocial Behaviors in Early Adolescence: Contributions of Peer Behavior and Perceptions of Adult and Peer Feedback
Author:
Gonzalez, Jose-Michael
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study identifies processes contributing to variability in antisocial and prosocial behaviors in early adolescence. More specifically, we considered how perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and peers (i.e., coolness) might account for some of the established associations between peer involvement in prosocial behaviors and an individual's engagement in prosocial and antisocial behaviors in the school context. Both adult praise and peer prosocial behavior are tested as predictors of school engagement and antisocial behavior in schools, with perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) examined as both a mediator and moderator using multilevel analysis (MLM) in a statewide sub-sample (N=6,525) of 8th grade Middle School/Junior High students located in Southwestern United States. Results testing mediation indicate a significantly positive association between reports of peer prosocial behavior and individual's own involvement in prosocial behaviors, and a significantly inverse association between reports of peer prosocial behavior and individual's own antisocial behaviors. Perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) only partially accounted for these associations. Conversely, results testing moderation indicated a significantly positive link between perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and individual's own engagement in prosocial behaviors, and an inverse association between perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and individual's own antisocial behaviors. No interaction effects were observed for perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) on these associations. These findings extend literature regarding the processes through which peer involvement in prosocial behavior is linked to individual prosocial and antisocial behaviors. This study makes research advancements by considering the contributions of perceived feedback from both adults and peers that can both be significant during early adolescence. These results justify implications for practice and policy related to prevention/intervention efforts that include peer associations, since they matter for prosocial behavior.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Evolutionary Psychology; Intervention; Antisocial Behavior; Peer Associations; Prosocial Behavior; Family & Consumer Sciences; Adult Praise; School Engagement
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family & Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnett, Melissa A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleVariability in Antisocial and Prosocial Behaviors in Early Adolescence: Contributions of Peer Behavior and Perceptions of Adult and Peer Feedbacken_US
dc.creatorGonzalez, Jose-Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Jose-Michaelen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe present study identifies processes contributing to variability in antisocial and prosocial behaviors in early adolescence. More specifically, we considered how perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and peers (i.e., coolness) might account for some of the established associations between peer involvement in prosocial behaviors and an individual's engagement in prosocial and antisocial behaviors in the school context. Both adult praise and peer prosocial behavior are tested as predictors of school engagement and antisocial behavior in schools, with perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) examined as both a mediator and moderator using multilevel analysis (MLM) in a statewide sub-sample (N=6,525) of 8th grade Middle School/Junior High students located in Southwestern United States. Results testing mediation indicate a significantly positive association between reports of peer prosocial behavior and individual's own involvement in prosocial behaviors, and a significantly inverse association between reports of peer prosocial behavior and individual's own antisocial behaviors. Perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) only partially accounted for these associations. Conversely, results testing moderation indicated a significantly positive link between perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and individual's own engagement in prosocial behaviors, and an inverse association between perceived feedback from adults (i.e., adult praise) and individual's own antisocial behaviors. No interaction effects were observed for perceived feedback from peers (i.e., coolness) on these associations. These findings extend literature regarding the processes through which peer involvement in prosocial behavior is linked to individual prosocial and antisocial behaviors. This study makes research advancements by considering the contributions of perceived feedback from both adults and peers that can both be significant during early adolescence. These results justify implications for practice and policy related to prevention/intervention efforts that include peer associations, since they matter for prosocial behavior.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectEvolutionary Psychologyen
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectAntisocial Behavioren
dc.subjectPeer Associationsen
dc.subjectProsocial Behavioren
dc.subjectFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
dc.subjectAdult Praiseen
dc.subjectSchool Engagementen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnett, Melissa A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberEllis, Bruce J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, Michele E.en
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