Analysis of the Barriers to Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620678
Title:
Analysis of the Barriers to Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands
Author:
Jones, Thomas Elisha
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Nation Building; Native American; Renewable Energy; Solar; Tribes; Natural Resources; American Indian
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Colombi, Benedict J.; Gimblett, Howard R.
Committee Chair:
Colombi, Benedict J.; Gimblett, Howard R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAnalysis of the Barriers to Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Landsen_US
dc.creatorJones, Thomas Elishaen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Thomas Elishaen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractNative American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectNation Buildingen
dc.subjectNative Americanen
dc.subjectRenewable Energyen
dc.subjectSolaren
dc.subjectTribesen
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resources Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.advisorGimblett, Howard R.en
dc.contributor.chairColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.chairGimblett, Howard R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTrosper, Ronald L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBegay, Manley A. Jr.en
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGimblett, Howard R.en
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